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Volcano Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1996 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Armed only with a flashlight, director Mick Jackson leads his "Volcano" camera crew into the inky depths of a 100-foot-long tube that's dressed up like a Los Angeles storm drain. His flashlight beam bounces off walls coated with blackened gunk, playing on motor oil cans scattered on the floor and a thicket of stalactite-like roots.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1996 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In July, Universal fired first in the battle of the dueling volcano movies, taking out a splashy ad in Variety heralding the March 7, 1997, release date of "Dante's Peak." Since then, 20th Century Fox has leapfrogged its competitor, indicating that its "Volcano" would surface seven days before. Both are locked in a furious post-production schedule, and though industry insiders expect one to blink, the studios are standing firm.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1996 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In July, Universal fired first in the battle of the dueling volcano movies, taking out a splashy ad in Variety heralding the March 7, 1997, release date of "Dante's Peak." Since then, 20th Century Fox has leapfrogged its competitor, indicating that its "Volcano" would surface seven days before. Both are locked in a furious post-production schedule, and though industry insiders expect one to blink, the studios are standing firm.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1996 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Armed only with a flashlight, director Mick Jackson leads his "Volcano" camera crew into the inky depths of a 100-foot-long tube that's dressed up like a Los Angeles storm drain. His flashlight beam bounces off walls coated with blackened gunk, playing on motor oil cans scattered on the floor and a thicket of stalactite-like roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1997 | ELAINE DUTKA
Box office was up for the 14th weekend in a row, hoisting this year's attendance figures nearly 20% over last year. "Volcano," starring Tommy Lee Jones and Anne Heche, led the pack. But the opening was less impressive than some had anticipated. "Relative to the cost of the picture and the enormous marketing campaign, the numbers weren't terrific," said John Krier, president of Exhibitor Relations, a firm that monitors box office. " 'Dante's Peak,' a volcano movie that opened to $18.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1997 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mammoth Mountain Ski Area says it successfully objected to plans to use Mammoth Lakes as the name of the locale in the recent TV movie "Volcano: Fire on the Mountain" after finding the script "offensive and exaggerated." After discussions between representatives of the ski area and producers at Davis Entertainment Co. of Century City, the name of the setting for the ABC film was changed to Angel Lakes, both parties confirmed.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By all accounts, the tourism industry in the Southern end of the state enjoyed a stellar year in 1996. With no natural or man-made disasters to deter them, visitors streamed into the region and spent freely. Disneyland and Universal Studios Hollywood boasted record attendance. Hotel occupancy was more than healthy. Conventions were booked in unheard-of volumes, particularly in Los Angeles. And 1997 will be a strong year as well, industry observers say, although maybe not as strong as 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1997 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Universal Pictures claimed scientific validity for its volcano movie, "Dante's Peak," opening itself to endless expert criticism. Twentieth Century Fox is not quite making the same mistake with its "Volcano," opening Friday. "The Coast Is Toast" is the movie's motto, and its story of a volcanic eruption in the La Brea tar pits and lava coursing along Wilshire Boulevard and through Metro Rail tunnels is part thrilling and part grisly.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Disaster movies have become Hollywood's version of the seven plagues, a series of natural catastrophes inflicted by the lords of studio misrule on defenseless audiences who can do no more than hope to survive and then survey the damage. After wind ("Twister"), water ("Daylight") and alien invasion ("Independence Day"), the latest plague to make the rounds is volcanic eruption.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1997 | Times Staff Writers and Contributors
Remember how you felt about Darth Vader the first time you encountered him? Scared and awed by his all-encompassing power? That's probably how folks at rival studios feel about 20th Century Fox right about now. Since Fox re-released "Star Wars" on Jan. 31, George Lucas' 1977 space epic has vaporized the competition and passed "E.T." to become the highest-grossing film of all time ($400 million-plus in North America alone). And the juggernaut rolls on.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Volcano" glows with heat. Lava heat. The coast may be toast, but it's the lava, covering everything like a malevolent tide of melted butter, that makes this a disaster picture that's tastier than usual. Hollywood's last volcano movie, the misbegotten "Dante's Peak," was particularly stingy in the lava department, barely letting it flow.
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