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WORLD
May 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Help is on the way for hundreds of household pets left behind after a volcano erupted in southern Chile, an animal welfare group said. The Coalition for Ethical Control of Urban Fauna said the Emergency Bureau offered to carry food to pets in Chaiten, a town six miles from the volcano of the same name. An estimated 450 dogs and 350 cats were left when residents were evacuated after the initial eruption May 2. Alejandra Cassino, a group representative, said, "There are some people among us thinking of a commando operation to reach the town."
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NATIONAL
March 28, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Alaska's Mt. Redoubt continued its volcanic explosions, sending an ash cloud 50,000 feet above sea level and prompting drivers to head to the auto parts store for new air filters. The National Weather Service said most of the ash was expected to fall to the north, but trace amounts of ash from Friday morning's eruption and smaller ones overnight could fall on Anchorage. Since the series of eruptions began Sunday night, the volcano has had several bursts. One Thursday sent ash 65,000 feet high.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Under a rain of ashes and hot sand, 4,000 peasants fled the slopes of a 2,600-foot volcano that erupted unexpectedly in the northwest of the country after having been dormant for more than 20 years. Several people were injured when the roofs of their homes collapsed under the weight of ashes but no deaths were reported.
SCIENCE
April 16, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
The massive billow of dust from an Icelandic volcano is pretty much a run-of-the-mill ash cloud that is a concern primarily because of its location and the prevailing winds, which are forcing it into transatlantic air lanes and over European airports, experts said Thursday. Except for the immediate vicinity of the volcano, the eruption is unlikely to produce long-term climatic or health effects unless there is a sharp change in the amount of material emitted, researchers said. Volcanic eruptions "are such a complicated natural phenomenon that almost every one is unique . . . and the amount of ash produced during a given eruption or the length of the eruption is really something that we can't predict," said Earth scientist Olivier Bachmann of the University of Washington.
TRAVEL
August 21, 2005
READING Jim Stancill's comment about Iceland ["Icelandic Charms Leave Them Cold," Letters, July 31], I feel I must erupt like the famous geysers on that island. Iceland is a wonderful country but must be taken as a whole. It is a mystical place with a changing landscape and surprises around every jagged mountain and volcano. Having been all over this Earth, I am often asked, "Where would you go if you only had one place to return to?" Iceland, no doubt. MONICA BOLLMEYER La Quinta
TRAVEL
October 25, 1987 | BRUCE WHIPPERMAN, Whipperman is a Berkeley, Calif., free-lance writer.
I used to think this was a free country. That's why I got a jolt when I found out that I was forbidden to use certain Hawaiian state highways. The official word they used was "prohibited," in a red-stamped warning across my Big Island car-rental contract: "Driving the Saddle Road in a rental car is prohibited and is entirely at the driver's risk and expense." I asked the woman behind the desk why, and she said it was "because the Saddle Road isn't a state highway. Or something like that."
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