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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
We all know that reading a novel can transport you, delight you and intrigue you while you're reading it. Now, thanks research by scientists at Emory University, we know that immersing yourself in a novel causes measurable physical changes in the brain that can be detected up to five days after the reader closes the book. The Emory researchers, in a paper for the journal Brain Connectivity, compared the effect to “muscle memory.” "The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist," neuroscientist Gregory Berns said, according to a report in the journal Science Codex . "We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else's shoes in a figurative sense.
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NEWS
July 26, 1985 | From Reuters
A Claymore mine set by leftist guerrillas wounded 18 Salvadoran troops in a small village north of the capital, the army said Thursday. The mine, which scatters shrapnel over a wide area, went off Wednesday in Las Cajas, 20 miles north of San Salvador near the Guazapa volcano. Troops of the first infantry brigade have for the last week been sweeping the area around the volcano, long considered a rebel stronghold.
TRAVEL
October 25, 1987 | BRUCE WHIPPERMAN, Whipperman is a Berkeley, Calif., free-lance writer.
I used to think this was a free country. That's why I got a jolt when I found out that I was forbidden to use certain Hawaiian state highways. The official word they used was "prohibited," in a red-stamped warning across my Big Island car-rental contract: "Driving the Saddle Road in a rental car is prohibited and is entirely at the driver's risk and expense." I asked the woman behind the desk why, and she said it was "because the Saddle Road isn't a state highway. Or something like that."
SCIENCE
April 23, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Volcano ash can wreck jet engines, poison freshwater lakes and damage lungs. But it helps fertilize oceans, volcano researchers and marine chemists say. "The ocean is gonna be happier" because of the Iceland eruption, said Ken Johnson, senior scientist with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. "Plants will grow more" — although how much more, he said, is unclear. About 30% of the oceans are what scientists call iron-limited — rich in many nutrients but missing iron, a crucial trace element for plants.
WORLD
May 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Help is on the way for hundreds of household pets left behind after a volcano erupted in southern Chile, an animal welfare group said. The Coalition for Ethical Control of Urban Fauna said the Emergency Bureau offered to carry food to pets in Chaiten, a town six miles from the volcano of the same name. An estimated 450 dogs and 350 cats were left when residents were evacuated after the initial eruption May 2. Alejandra Cassino, a group representative, said, "There are some people among us thinking of a commando operation to reach the town."
NATIONAL
March 28, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Alaska's Mt. Redoubt continued its volcanic explosions, sending an ash cloud 50,000 feet above sea level and prompting drivers to head to the auto parts store for new air filters. The National Weather Service said most of the ash was expected to fall to the north, but trace amounts of ash from Friday morning's eruption and smaller ones overnight could fall on Anchorage. Since the series of eruptions began Sunday night, the volcano has had several bursts. One Thursday sent ash 65,000 feet high.
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