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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
We all know that reading a novel can transport you, delight you and intrigue you while you're reading it. Now, thanks research by scientists at Emory University, we know that immersing yourself in a novel causes measurable physical changes in the brain that can be detected up to five days after the reader closes the book. The Emory researchers, in a paper for the journal Brain Connectivity, compared the effect to “muscle memory.” "The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist," neuroscientist Gregory Berns said, according to a report in the journal Science Codex . "We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else's shoes in a figurative sense.
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WORLD
May 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Help is on the way for hundreds of household pets left behind after a volcano erupted in southern Chile, an animal welfare group said. The Coalition for Ethical Control of Urban Fauna said the Emergency Bureau offered to carry food to pets in Chaiten, a town six miles from the volcano of the same name. An estimated 450 dogs and 350 cats were left when residents were evacuated after the initial eruption May 2. Alejandra Cassino, a group representative, said, "There are some people among us thinking of a commando operation to reach the town."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
"The Last Days of Pompeii: Decadence, Apocalypse, Resurrection," which opened recently at the Getty Villa at the edge of Malibu, includes a small Andy Warhol painting commissioned in 1985 by a gallery in Naples, Italy. The canvas is rather ugly. But fame was a primary Warhol motif, and its subject - an erupting Mt. Vesuvius - ranks as a rock-star volcano. Vesuvius probably hasn't done as much damage as Krakatau (west of Java), which sent powerful shock waves all around the globe when it blew up with cataclysmic force in the Pacific in 1883.
SCIENCE
April 16, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
The massive billow of dust from an Icelandic volcano is pretty much a run-of-the-mill ash cloud that is a concern primarily because of its location and the prevailing winds, which are forcing it into transatlantic air lanes and over European airports, experts said Thursday. Except for the immediate vicinity of the volcano, the eruption is unlikely to produce long-term climatic or health effects unless there is a sharp change in the amount of material emitted, researchers said. Volcanic eruptions "are such a complicated natural phenomenon that almost every one is unique . . . and the amount of ash produced during a given eruption or the length of the eruption is really something that we can't predict," said Earth scientist Olivier Bachmann of the University of Washington.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Alaska's Mt. Redoubt continued its volcanic explosions, sending an ash cloud 50,000 feet above sea level and prompting drivers to head to the auto parts store for new air filters. The National Weather Service said most of the ash was expected to fall to the north, but trace amounts of ash from Friday morning's eruption and smaller ones overnight could fall on Anchorage. Since the series of eruptions began Sunday night, the volcano has had several bursts. One Thursday sent ash 65,000 feet high.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Under a rain of ashes and hot sand, 4,000 peasants fled the slopes of a 2,600-foot volcano that erupted unexpectedly in the northwest of the country after having been dormant for more than 20 years. Several people were injured when the roofs of their homes collapsed under the weight of ashes but no deaths were reported.
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