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NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
Trekkers looking for a rigorous challenge might want to check out Tropic's eight-day, seven-night excursion that takes in four volcanoes and various ecosystems in Ecuador. The lodge-to-lodge adventure begins in Quito with a city tour. Subsequent stops along the route include the Pasochoa Reserve and a climb up 13,780-foot tall Pasochoa Peak, an extinct volcano, and Cotopaxi National Park and Cotopaxi, one of the highest active volcanoes in the world at 19,300 feet. Other destinations include Ruminahui, another dormant volcano, and the Limpiopungo Lagoon.
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TRAVEL
April 25, 2014 | By Larry Bleiberg
QUITO, Ecuador - As the four-car train rolls through the clouds and begins its descent of the Andes, Bette Bleeker has a practical concern. "I hope someone checked the brakes," the Chicago resident asks. It's a fair question, given the 1,755-foot descent we're about to make on the Devil's Nose, one of the steepest sections of railroad in the world. The historic route requires several switchbacks, including one length where the train reverses direction and heads backward as it gingerly stair-steps down the highlands.
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SCIENCE
July 13, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Ancient volcanoes discovered deep in the ocean off Antarctica may explain a climate mystery critical to predicting Earth's fate as humans pump more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. University of Texas geologists dredging thousands of feet below the surface of the central Scotia Sea off the southeastern tip of South America hauled up volcanic rock after their sonar mapping showed formations that looked uncannily like a sunken island chain. “It just didn't look like real ocean floor,” said geologist Ian W. Dalziel, of the University of Texas, Austin, lead author of the paper published Thursday in the journal Geology.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
Trekkers looking for a rigorous challenge might want to check out Tropic's eight-day, seven-night excursion that takes in four volcanoes and various ecosystems in Ecuador. The lodge-to-lodge adventure begins in Quito with a city tour. Subsequent stops along the route include the Pasochoa Reserve and a climb up 13,780-foot tall Pasochoa Peak, an extinct volcano, and Cotopaxi National Park and Cotopaxi, one of the highest active volcanoes in the world at 19,300 feet. Other destinations include Ruminahui, another dormant volcano, and the Limpiopungo Lagoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1988 | from Times staff and wire reports
Scientists have used radar waves from three antennas in the Mojave Desert to peek beneath the dense clouds of Venus and capture images that suggest that the planet has had active volcanoes in the not-too-distant past. The fuzzy images show mountains that seem to be of volcanic origin and broad lava flows up to 350 miles long, according to the scientists, Raymond F. Jurgens, Martin F. Slade and R. Stephen Saunders of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory near Pasadena. Previous images from U.S.
NATIONAL
August 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
One of the state's most active volcanoes could be working toward a major eruption that could affect air travel, scientists said in Anchorage. Satellite images of Pavlof Volcano showed strong thermal readings, consistent with what the Alaska Volcano Observatory was calling a "vigorous eruption" of lava at the volcano about 590 miles southwest of Anchorage.
WORLD
October 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesia warned that one of its deadliest volcanoes was poised to erupt and ordered nearly 30,000 people living along its slopes to evacuate. But some residents defied the warnings and left refugee centers today to tend crops and animals. With no compensation for farmers' losses, it is difficult to force them to leave their villages. Another worry is that thieves will target empty properties. Some inhabitants also said they had not been fed at the shelters.
NEWS
April 7, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A reawakened volcano sprayed tons of ash miles into the air on Saturday, forcing out residents who had tried to return to retrieve belongings abandoned after an earlier eruption. Authorities had already evacuated about 5,000 residents from the southern third of this small Caribbean island on Wednesday, when an eruption sent ash more than 6,000 feet into the air and molten rock began flowing at the crater of the Soufriere Hills volcano.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park will offer free admission and cultural enrichment on July 13 at its annual Cultural Festival, now in its 33rd year. The festival will be 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the park service's Kahua Hula (traditional hula platform) south of the Kilauea Visitor Center . The festival, expected to attract about 5,000 people, preserves and perpetuates Hawaiian culture. Visitors can participate in activities such as learning to strum the ukulele, weaving coconut baskets and playing traditional island games.
NEWS
September 17, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Howler monkeys, crocodiles, toucans, parrots and lots of birds star in this 10-day trip to Costa Rica sponsored by the Greater L.A. Zoo Assn. The naturalist-led expedition explores Volcan Poas National Park to learn about active volcanoes, the Monteverde Cloud Forest mountain reserve, Carara National Park on the Pacific Coast and a rain forest at Braulio Carrillo, with an aerial tram that takes you into the tree canopy. A tour of capital city San Jose also is included. When: Costa Rica: Nature's Treasure House runs from Nov. 11-20.
TRAVEL
March 14, 2014 | By Dean Kuipers
MONTALCINO, Italy - " Scusi ," I said to a well-dressed man in this medieval Tuscan village, where even the gas station was somehow part of the farming landscape. "Can you tell me how to get to Castiglion del Bosco?" "Hmm, yes," he said in English, taking my map, then, " Un momento . " He dialed his cellphone, and I realized he was asking someone for the best route. Not the first or last time we found the Italians to be incredibly helpful. "I can tell you how to get there, but my wine is much better," he said, laughing.
SCIENCE
February 25, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
An unusual swarm of volcanic eruptions over the last 14 years may be partially responsible for the slowing of global warming, a new report suggests. The 17 eruptions from 1998-2012 pumped sulfur dioxide into Earth's upper atmosphere, where it formed liquid particles that reflected more sunlight back to space, moderating the larger-scale warming of the planet surface, according to the study published online Monday in Nature Geoscience. PHOTOS: Erupting volcanoes Adding the volcanic activity into calculations effectively reduced the discrepancy between observed temperature trends and the models that underpin the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's reports on climate change attributable to human activity.
SCIENCE
February 17, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
For 100,000 years, a pod of cool magma has been sitting mostly immobile beneath the Mt. Hood volcano. Consider it cold storage.  As long as the magma stays cool, the volcano will not erupt. Cool magma is like peanut butter straight from the fridge - difficult to move. But if the conditions are right, that magma can liquefy in just a few months, potentially leading to an eruption, according to new research. Hot magma from deep in the Earth's crust bubbles up, mixes with the cool magma and causes it to liquefy.
WORLD
February 14, 2014 | By Alexandra Zavis
At least three people were killed and tens of thousands forced to flee their homes when a volcano erupted on Indonesia's most populous island, shutting down airports and showering the region with ash and grit. The eruption of Mt. Kelud in Java began late Thursday night and could be heard as far as 125 miles away, according to local news reports . “The eruption sounded like thousands of bombs exploding,” Ratno Pramono, a 35-year-old farmer from the nearby village of Sugihwaras, told the Associated Press.
SCIENCE
February 4, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
In the northeast of China, at the Yixian and Jiufotang formations, scientists have discovered thousands of exquisitely preserved fossils of plants and birds, dinosaurs and mammals. Together they make up the Jehol Biota -- an ecosystem, preserved in ash, that dates back nearly 130 million years. Some of these fossils are so complete that researchers can determine what a dinosaur had for breakfast on the day it died. Others include impressions of an animal's muscles and skin, as well as hair, feathers and scales.  The fossils tell us that back in the lower Cretaceous period this land was humid, and dotted with conifer forests and lakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
It's an idea that's easy to grasp: Justin Vernon onstage in Los Angeles the week before the Grammy Awards. Two years ago, after all, the singer-songwriter and his Wisconsin band Bon Iver were named best new artist at the Grammys, and “Bon Iver, Bon Iver” -- a modest masterpiece of deep-feel introspection -- won the prize for alternative music album. So it seems natural that Vernon would return to town for the annual crush of concerts and parties that takes place during the run-up to “music's biggest night,” set this year for Jan. 26. PHOTOS: Concerts by the Times Only Vernon didn't draw a sold-out crowd to the Fonda Theatre on Saturday with Bon Iver.
SCIENCE
April 23, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Ice-covered volcanoes like the one in Iceland that brought European air traffic to a standstill are the center of an emerging branch of volcano science that seeks to answer important questions about climate change. Scientists believe the rocks created when volcanoes erupt beneath glaciers contain distinct chemical signatures that indicate the thickness of the ice that was above the volcanoes when they blew. By correlating the thickness with the age of the rocks, researchers can estimate the degree to which Earth was covered by glaciers thousands — or even millions — of years ago. That information is crucial to climatologists who want to understand how ice and temperature conspire to make the globe cool down or heat up. "In the big global climate models that they run on supercomputers, ice cover on the Earth is very important," said Ian Skilling, a volcanologist at the University of Pittsburgh.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Here's a way to see more of Costa Rica it at your own pace. The Costa Rica Fly & Drive package from Gate1 Travel starts with a drive from capital city San Jose to Arenal,  known for its volcano and national park of the same name. From there, it's on to visit Monteverde and a cloud forest reserve that has a treetop walkway on suspended bridges and trails. Drives between cities take three to four hours if you follow the recommended itinerary for this self-guided trip.
SCIENCE
December 18, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
There is a new island on our planet. Its name is Niijima, and you can see one of its newest baby pictures, courtesy of NASA, above. Niijima   is a volcanic island. It emerged from the Pacific Ocean one month ago, about 600 miles south of Tokyo. It is still rather small -- just 13.8  acres according to a recent  report . It rises 60 to 80 feet above sea level. The picture above was taken Dec. 8 by the Advanced Land Imager on NASA's Earth Observing satellite.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
An exploding underwater volcano is causing a new island to form in the Pacific Ocean about 620 miles south of Tokyo, and you can watch a bit of its dramatic rise in the video above. The video, showing thick plumes of steam and ash shooting out of the new volcanic island, was captured this week by the Japan Coast Guard. The new island -- really more of an islet -- is just 600 feet in diameter, according to an Associated Press report . And it is unclear whether it is here to stay.
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