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NEWS
August 23, 1992 | DAVID HULEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From above, it looked like a nuclear mushroom cloud, a billowing black column flashing with lightning and rising 11 miles into the afternoon sky. On the ground in Alaska's largest city, the western horizon turned blue-black, with eerie yellow and green fringes like an approaching hurricane, and within hours the whole city was swallowed into darkness. Then it started raining sand. For six hours last Tuesday, Anchorage was showered in ash from Mt. Spurr, an 11,069-foot volcano 80 miles away.
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NEWS
December 25, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mt. Shishaldin, a 9,372-foot volcano at the eastern end of the Aleutian Islands, spewed an ash plume 35,000 feet high and into commercial air routes. However, no planes were damaged and scientists don't expect further eruptions. "We had one burst and then it's done nothing since then. This was a one-shot deal as far as we can tell," said volcanologist Tina Neal of the Alaska Volcano Observatory. Light ash fall was reported about 50 miles to the east.
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NEWS
January 14, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
For days after Redoubt Volcano erupted Dec. 13, the weather was so bad that no airplane could get near the 10,197-foot mountain--except one. That was a Cessna 185 flown by Hollis Twitchell, Lake Clark National Park's only year-round ranger and one of a handful of National Park Service pilot-rangers. "It was a week-and-a-half before other planes (from Anchorage) were able to fly over the volcano. We were lucky.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Dante II robot that spider-walked its way into a volcanic crater was lifted out by helicopter Saturday, more than a week after a misstep sent the 1,700-pound NASA explorer sprawling in the boulder-strewn landscape. Scientists from Carnegie Mellon University took advantage of good weather to mount the rushed retrieval of the eight-legged robot, developed for NASA and brought to Alaska to test its ability to explore terrain similar to that encountered on other planets.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | From Associated Press
Dante II was supposed to go where no human could. After it went there and got stuck, a human stood ready to go in and bring the $1.7-million robot back. The eight-legged machine was walking out of the Mt. Spurr volcano on Friday when it lost its footing 400 feet from the rim and toppled over. A National Guard helicopter flew to the volcano's rim on Monday, planning to hook onto the robot's tether and hoist the 1,700-pound robot free.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Redoubt Volcano in Alaska erupted anew, sending a jet of ash and steam nearly seven miles high and scattering grit that led authorities to cancel classes for 2,000 students on the Kenai Peninsula. The "moderate to strong" eruption, the first significant activity since Jan. 15, began around 4 a.m. and was over in minutes. The ash cloud headed for the Gulf of Alaska, a spokesman for the U.S. Geological Survey said, and away from the Anchorage area, 115 miles to the northwest.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | Associated Press
The Soviet Union on Sunday allowed a South Korean jetliner to fly over its territory after a volcanic eruption in Alaska prevented the plane from taking the North Pole route to Paris, officials said. It was the first time a regular Korean Air flight was allowed to pass through Soviet airspace en route to Europe. The KAL Boeing 747 carrying 290 passengers and crew arrived in the French capital shortly before noon after a 13-hour flight.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Redoubt Volcano rumbled through another eruption, ejecting a plume that rose more than 5 miles into the sky, the Alaska Volcano Observatory said. There was no confirmation of ash in the plume, but it probably contained some, an observatory geologist said. The FAA alerted pilots that volcanic ash was possible in the Redoubt area. Ash can shut down jet engines.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | From Associated Press
An effort to lift NASA's crippled Dante II robot from a volcano by helicopter failed Tuesday when the cable snapped, dropping the machine farther down the crater. A scientist on the ground fell and broke his ankle. Scientists debated whether to go to their backup plan--sending a person into the crater to put a helicopter sling around Dante--or abandon the $1.7-million spider-like robot altogether, as was suggested when Dante first got stuck.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | From Associated Press
Dante II was supposed to go where no human could. After it went there and got stuck, a human stood ready to go in and bring the $1.7-million robot back. The eight-legged machine was walking out of the Mt. Spurr volcano on Friday when it lost its footing 400 feet from the rim and toppled over. A National Guard helicopter flew to the volcano's rim on Monday, planning to hook onto the robot's tether and hoist the 1,700-pound robot free.
NEWS
August 5, 1994 | From Reuters
A robot exploring the inside of an active Alaskan volcano began walking again Thursday after its remote power supply was fixed by engineers, scientists said. The eight-legged Dante II robot had started to climb back up the inside of the Mt. Spurr volcano, 90 miles west of Anchorage, Wednesday after completing its science mission when it suffered a loss of power, they said. It spent the night and part of Thursday stranded some 600 feet below the rim of the crater.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | DAVID HULEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From above, it looked like a nuclear mushroom cloud, a billowing black column flashing with lightning and rising 11 miles into the afternoon sky. On the ground in Alaska's largest city, the western horizon turned blue-black, with eerie yellow and green fringes like an approaching hurricane, and within hours the whole city was swallowed into darkness. Then it started raining sand. For six hours last Tuesday, Anchorage was showered in ash from Mt. Spurr, an 11,069-foot volcano 80 miles away.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | Associated Press
As much as a quarter-inch of gritty volcanic ash coated Alaska's largest city on Wednesday, keeping some workers from their jobs, prompting runs on car air filters and surgical masks and grounding aircraft. Ash was blown more than 10 miles into the sky when Mt. Spurr erupted Tuesday. The volcano is about 80 miles west of here. Winds blew the huge plume over the city, where it rained down a thick coat of gray-yellow ash, obscuring lane markers on many roads.
NEWS
August 19, 1992 | Associated Press
The Mt. Spurr volcano erupted Tuesday for the second time this summer, showering light ash on Anchorage, 80 miles to the east, and closing several airports. The ash began raining on Anchorage, the state's largest city, about 8 p.m., a little more than four hours after the volcano erupted. Within minutes authorities had closed Anchorage International Airport, Merrill Field, Lake Hood, Elmendorf Air Force Base and Kenai Municipal Airport, stranding hundreds of tourists.
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
After 39 years of dormancy, the Mt. Spurr volcano spewed ash and steam at least five miles into the sky but spared settlements dusted with ash during a nearby 1989 eruption. Scientists at the Alaska Volcano Observatory in Anchorage said the first "moderate explosive eruption" occurred at 7:04 a.m. Two more eruptions were reported at hourly intervals and volcanologists forecast more to come. No injuries were reported and no health alerts were ordered.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Aleutian Island volcano dormant for 13 years sent steaming lava down its snow-covered ridges and a plume of ash more than four miles high. Westdahl Volcano is on Unimak Island in the eastern Aleutians, about 700 miles southwest of Anchorage. There were no reports of injuries or ash landing in any inhabited areas of the Aleutians. Eruptions are likely to continue over the next few weeks, authorities said. There are no measuring devices on the mountain.
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