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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1996 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Geological Survey on Thursday declared a moderate-level volcano hazards alert in the Mammoth Lakes area after a swarm of more than 100 earthquakes during the day. Research geophysicist Malcolm Johnson of the USGS said the alert is "fairly uncommon." It reflects "a moderate level of increased activity and unrest in the vicinity of the Mammoth Mountain volcano," he said.
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NEWS
November 22, 1997
The U.S. Geological Survey reported Friday that there have been more than 1,700 volcanic earthquakes in the last week close to the Eastern Sierra town of Mammoth Lakes, 244 of magnitude 2.0 or above, and 14 at or above 3.0. But scientists monitoring the seismic activity said it has diminished sharply since Monday, when a daily high of more than 600 quakes was recorded.
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NEWS
February 17, 1996
The swarm of earthquakes that triggered a moderate-level volcano hazards alert this week in the Mammoth Lakes area diminished Friday, according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey, raising the prospect that the alert could be canceled by the end of Sunday. The strongest of about 20 quakes recorded several miles southeast of Mammoth Lakes on Friday registered only a magnitude 2.9, compared with more than 100 registered Thursday, the strongest a 3.5.
NEWS
February 17, 1996
The swarm of earthquakes that triggered a moderate-level volcano hazards alert this week in the Mammoth Lakes area diminished Friday, according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey, raising the prospect that the alert could be canceled by the end of Sunday. The strongest of about 20 quakes recorded several miles southeast of Mammoth Lakes on Friday registered only a magnitude 2.9, compared with more than 100 registered Thursday, the strongest a 3.5.
NEWS
November 22, 1997
The U.S. Geological Survey reported Friday that there have been more than 1,700 volcanic earthquakes in the last week close to the Eastern Sierra town of Mammoth Lakes, 244 of magnitude 2.0 or above, and 14 at or above 3.0. But scientists monitoring the seismic activity said it has diminished sharply since Monday, when a daily high of more than 600 quakes was recorded.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
The California scientist who watched an underwater volcano erupt beneath his research ship earlier this month believes he may have discovered the source of certain acoustic signals that have long baffled researchers in the South Pacific. Harmon Craig, a geochemist at UC San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography, said Monday that the so-called T-waves observed by seismologists over the last 20 years appear to come from exploding bubbles of gas rising from underwater volcanoes.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal scientists monitoring volcanic activity under Mammoth Mountain report that they have measured an increase in carbon dioxide emissions near the mountain, prompting the closure of a high country campground. The apparent rise in gas emissions to 1,200 metric tons a day--as high as at many active volcanoes, and two to three times higher than at Mammoth last year--and an increase in earthquakes this year have led the U.S. Geological Survey to pay closer scrutiny to the Mammoth Lakes region.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
When Shirley Manfredi-Below admires the way Mt. Shasta towers over this little railroad town, she sees a snow-patched peak that is at once familiar and breathtaking, a source of pride and prosperity to the area. That is all fine by the U.S. Geological Survey, but federal scientists also want Manfredi and her neighbors in hamlets around the mountain 250 miles north of Sacramento to see Mt. Shasta as something more--an active volcano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2000 | MATTHEW FORDAHL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Much of the world's population lives on potentially shaky ground, scientists said after releasing the first map detailing the entire planet's earthquake hazard zones. The ominously colorful document offers few surprises: Southern California, southeastern Hawaii, Turkey, Taiwan, Iceland and the India-China border are most likely to experience strong shaking in the future. "Active tectonics make outstanding scenery, and people want to live there," said Kaye Shedlock of the U.S. Geological Survey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1996 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Geological Survey on Thursday declared a moderate-level volcano hazards alert in the Mammoth Lakes area after a swarm of more than 100 earthquakes during the day. Research geophysicist Malcolm Johnson of the USGS said the alert is "fairly uncommon." It reflects "a moderate level of increased activity and unrest in the vicinity of the Mammoth Mountain volcano," he said.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal scientists monitoring volcanic activity under Mammoth Mountain report that they have measured an increase in carbon dioxide emissions near the mountain, prompting the closure of a high country campground. The apparent rise in gas emissions to 1,200 metric tons a day--as high as at many active volcanoes, and two to three times higher than at Mammoth last year--and an increase in earthquakes this year have led the U.S. Geological Survey to pay closer scrutiny to the Mammoth Lakes region.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
When Shirley Manfredi-Below admires the way Mt. Shasta towers over this little railroad town, she sees a snow-patched peak that is at once familiar and breathtaking, a source of pride and prosperity to the area. That is all fine by the U.S. Geological Survey, but federal scientists also want Manfredi and her neighbors in hamlets around the mountain 250 miles north of Sacramento to see Mt. Shasta as something more--an active volcano.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
The California scientist who watched an underwater volcano erupt beneath his research ship earlier this month believes he may have discovered the source of certain acoustic signals that have long baffled researchers in the South Pacific. Harmon Craig, a geochemist at UC San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography, said Monday that the so-called T-waves observed by seismologists over the last 20 years appear to come from exploding bubbles of gas rising from underwater volcanoes.
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