Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVolcanoes Ecuador
IN THE NEWS

Volcanoes Ecuador

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | Associated Press
After menacing Quito for a year, Ecuadorean volcano Guagua Pichincha claimed its first victim Wednesday, an elderly man with respiratory problems who died after heavy ash fell over the capital. A man and three women were hurt when they fell from the roofs of their homes trying to clean ash that had built up overnight, the Red Cross said. Authorities said the 15,840-foot volcano had dumped 5,000 tons of ash on this city of 1.4 million people in the preceding 24 hours.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | Associated Press
After menacing Quito for a year, Ecuadorean volcano Guagua Pichincha claimed its first victim Wednesday, an elderly man with respiratory problems who died after heavy ash fell over the capital. A man and three women were hurt when they fell from the roofs of their homes trying to clean ash that had built up overnight, the Red Cross said. Authorities said the 15,840-foot volcano had dumped 5,000 tons of ash on this city of 1.4 million people in the preceding 24 hours.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | ANN CONWAY
Patrick Veitch will show you a secret Australian beach where kangaroos play in the surf and eat from your hand. Janet Seward knows of a rooftop ride on a steam engine that winds through the Valley of the Volcanoes in Ecuador. If it's culture in the Big City you're after, look no further than Marc Ravenhill: his theater getaways to New York and London are as hot as "Ragtime" tickets. From exotic to domestic, these people are making travel plans. But not for profit.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1987 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Times Staff Writer
There were mixed signals concerning Graham Chapman's appearance at the Comedy & Magic Club in Hermosa Beach (a three-day stopover that began Sunday). The audience was keenly interested in an entertainment. What it got instead was a combination reminiscence and career update from someone who apparently assumed that his appearance alone was worthy in itself. Chapman's assumption was not altogether unfounded.
TRAVEL
March 24, 1991 | JAMES T. YENCKEL, WASHINGTON POST
Chris Skow, a Union Pacific freight conductor, is a nostalgia buff who goes bonkers over trains. He loves them all, especially the aged trains that ply the high mountains of Latin America. The romance of rail travel still flourishes south of the border, he says, and allows you to step back into the 1940s. In the past two decades, he's made 55 trips to satisfy his offbeat passion. But there's a practical side to Skow, too.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|