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Volcanoes Iceland

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NEWS
December 19, 1998 | Reuters
A volcano erupted under Europe's biggest glacier Friday, belching gray smoke and black ash miles into the Icelandic sky. Scientists said the eruption under the Vatnajokull glacier would not endanger populated areas and was unlikely to cause heavy melting of ice. It was believed to be coming up through Grimsvotn lake.
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WORLD
April 18, 2010 | By Henry Chu
The miasma of volcanic ash hovering over Europe showed no sign of dissipating Saturday, keeping thousands of forlorn travelers stranded across the continent for a third day and worsening economic losses. The cloud of grit from the still-erupting Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland began creeping as far south as Italy, forcing authorities to shut down airports in the northern part of that country. Travelers anchored to Earth continued their scramble for hotels, or for trains, ferries and even taxis to reach their destinations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1987
An ancient volcanic eruption in Iceland likely triggered a famine that killed half China's population, bolstering fears that a "nuclear winter" would cause mass starvation after a nuclear war, says a NASA astronomer. Kevin Pang said the sunlight-blocking effect of a very large eruption in 210 BC resulted in a "volcanic winter" forcing "very severe disturbances in world agriculture." "This fairly big eruption in Iceland caused something like half the Chinese people to die," he said.
NEWS
December 19, 1998 | Reuters
A volcano erupted under Europe's biggest glacier Friday, belching gray smoke and black ash miles into the Icelandic sky. Scientists said the eruption under the Vatnajokull glacier would not endanger populated areas and was unlikely to cause heavy melting of ice. It was believed to be coming up through Grimsvotn lake.
NEWS
November 7, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A volcano beneath Europe's largest glacier erupted again Wednesday, just as flooding brought on by an earlier eruption began to recede. Ash spewed 12,000 feet in the air for 20 minutes Wednesday afternoon, just south of the site of last month's 11-day eruption, the Morgunbladid newspaper said. The ash spread south over the uninhabited Vatnajokull glacier for about three miles.
WORLD
April 18, 2010 | By Henry Chu
The miasma of volcanic ash hovering over Europe showed no sign of dissipating Saturday, keeping thousands of forlorn travelers stranded across the continent for a third day and worsening economic losses. The cloud of grit from the still-erupting Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland began creeping as far south as Italy, forcing authorities to shut down airports in the northern part of that country. Travelers anchored to Earth continued their scramble for hotels, or for trains, ferries and even taxis to reach their destinations.
TRAVEL
August 18, 1991 | LUCY IZON
Teen-agers who dream of a glamorous, Indiana Jones-style profession can get a taste of the scientific lifestyle by participating on actual expeditions. Two organizations, Earthwatch and Foundation for Field Research, organize volunteers for scientific projects. Scientists of more than 150 projects in North America and abroad need inexperienced teen-agers and adults to assist from several days to several weeks.
SCIENCE
July 11, 2003 | Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writer
NASA doesn't plan to launch humans to Mars anytime soon, so Pascal Lee decided to drive. First came miles of seemingly endless ridges of ice and expanses of grayish-yellow rock. Then yawning canyons and, in the distance, the rim of a massive meteor crater. Through the frosted windshield, Lee scanned the terrain for the myriad dangers of this alien landscape: snowdrifts capable of swallowing his Humvee, a precariously thin skin of ice on the frozen ocean and really hungry polar bears.
NEWS
February 16, 1987 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
A Soviet scientist, climbing over lava beds still warm from the continuing eruption of Kilauea Volcano, paused as he tried to explain why volcanologists are unable to figure out just what makes some volcanoes explode with spectacular fury. S. A. Fedotov of the Soviet Union's Institute of Volcanology kicked at a chunk of lava and summed up the frustration shared by volcano experts around the world: "We are trying to learn how the engine operates by studying the exhaust."
NEWS
November 7, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A volcano beneath Europe's largest glacier erupted again Wednesday, just as flooding brought on by an earlier eruption began to recede. Ash spewed 12,000 feet in the air for 20 minutes Wednesday afternoon, just south of the site of last month's 11-day eruption, the Morgunbladid newspaper said. The ash spread south over the uninhabited Vatnajokull glacier for about three miles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1987
An ancient volcanic eruption in Iceland likely triggered a famine that killed half China's population, bolstering fears that a "nuclear winter" would cause mass starvation after a nuclear war, says a NASA astronomer. Kevin Pang said the sunlight-blocking effect of a very large eruption in 210 BC resulted in a "volcanic winter" forcing "very severe disturbances in world agriculture." "This fairly big eruption in Iceland caused something like half the Chinese people to die," he said.
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