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NEWS
July 18, 1999 | Associated Press
The Colima volcano in western Mexico erupted Saturday, sending a plume of smoke four miles into the air and forcing the evacuation of nearly 300 people from two states. The eruption, which happened at 12:45 p.m., spewed ash for two hours from the volcano, located 110 miles south of Guadalajara.
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WORLD
May 14, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Mexico's giant Popocatepetl volcano may generate lava flows, explosions of "growing intensity" and ash that could reach miles away, the National Center for Disaster Prevention said Monday. Officials were preparing evacuation routes and shelters for thousands of people who live in the shadow of Popocatepetl, located 40 miles southeast of Mexico City. Officials have created a 7.5-mile restricted zone around the cone of the volcano. Popo, as the volcano is known, has displayed a "notable increase in activity levels" in the last few days, including tremors and explosive eruptions, according to a statement from the federal government.
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NEWS
December 24, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN and KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To the ancient Aztecs, Popocatepetl was the dwelling place for the souls of evil rulers, a towering caldron of smoke and fire, the living symbol of hell on Earth whose fury seemed to presage the great disasters of their era. To U.S. scientists, the snow-peaked mountain 39 miles southeast of Mexico City has been an extraordinary living laboratory, an active volcano within reach of their research centers and one that many believe could erupt at any moment.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities gave tens of thousands of people permission to return to their homes near Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano but warned them to remain on alert. The announcement spelled the end of an evacuation that began Dec. 15, when scientists detected alarming tremors beneath the 17,887-foot mountain about 40 miles southeast of Mexico City. On Dec. 18, Popocatepetl produced its most violent eruption in 1,200 years, though it caused no injuries.
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
As Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano rumbled, residents in nearby towns largely ignored calls to evacuate Saturday, strolling in open plazas to watch the cone spout plumes of smoke and ash. Officials rang church bells and drove through the streets to alert residents after up to 40,000 people in 17 towns at the volcano's base were asked to leave the area, the first evacuation since 1994.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities gave tens of thousands of people permission to return to their homes near Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano but warned them to remain on alert. The announcement spelled the end of an evacuation that began Dec. 15, when scientists detected alarming tremors beneath the 17,887-foot mountain about 40 miles southeast of Mexico City. On Dec. 18, Popocatepetl produced its most violent eruption in 1,200 years, though it caused no injuries.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | From Reuters
Mexico's government on Thursday warned people living in the shadow of Popocatepetl volcano to prepare to flee after the mountain spat out red-hot rocks in a strong late-night eruption. An official at the Disaster Prevention Center's monitoring station said the 17,992-foot snowcapped volcano 33 miles southeast of Mexico City spewed blazing rocks out of its crater at 10:20 p.m.
NEWS
July 1, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Emergency officials declared a red alert for the towering Popocatepetl volcano southeast of Mexico City and prepared to evacuate thousands of residents who may be at risk. Clouds of swirling ash rained on the outskirts of the capital. Burning rocks bounced down the volcano's sides in what officials said was the most intense seismic activity since they began monitoring the volcano years ago.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | Associated Press
The picturesque Popocatepetl volcano that overlooks Mexico City spouted plumes of gas and ash 2 1/2 to 3 miles into the air Thursday in what experts described as the geologic equivalent of a belch. Although it was the largest volcanic activity at the snow-covered peak in the past five to six months, Robert Quass of Mexico's National Center for Disaster Prevention said the flare-up did not portend a full-scale eruption. "The explosions are simply an opening up . . .
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | Associated Press
The Popocatepetl volcano belched a short-lived shower of glowing grit and ash before dawn Tuesday, frightening villagers living on the flanks of the mountain southeast of Mexico City. But civil defense officials told the government news agency Notimex that the brief burst was no cause for alarm--only the latest of frequent rumblings by the volcano.
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano stirred from a quiet slumber Monday, spewing tall plumes of ash and causing several small earthquakes. The volcano had quieted down since its eruption early last week, its strongest in more than a millennium. Scientists have warned that more strong eruptions are possible.
NEWS
December 25, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christmas Eve under the volcano was a time of melancholy and resolve for 40,000 villagers who took refuge in homes and makeshift shelters and restlessly awaited another big eruption of the feared Popocatepetl. At the Miguel Aleman School in this town about 18 miles from the crater, 1,045 denizens of the volcano's slopes spent Sunday night on thin mattresses in unheated classrooms that are being used as dormitories. "Christmas will be both sad and happy," said Francisca Sanchez, a mother of two.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mexican government swiftly evacuated thousands more people Tuesday from homes near the Popocatepetl volcano as the behemoth erupted for a second day, hurling molten rocks the size of beach balls into the air. Authorities said they were on "maximum alert" Tuesday afternoon because a series of tremors in the volcano indicated that a vigorous new eruption was likely.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One of the world's biggest volcanoes, Popocatepetl, exploded Monday night in its most powerful eruption in at least 400 years, but the blasts of glowing red rocks did not cause any deaths or major damage around the mountain, which is just 40 miles from Mexico City. Authorities had urged reluctant villagers living on the volcano's flanks to evacuate in recent days, fearing that pressure building inside it could cause a dangerous eruption.
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
As Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano rumbled, residents in nearby towns largely ignored calls to evacuate Saturday, strolling in open plazas to watch the cone spout plumes of smoke and ash. Officials rang church bells and drove through the streets to alert residents after up to 40,000 people in 17 towns at the volcano's base were asked to leave the area, the first evacuation since 1994.
NEWS
July 18, 1999 | Associated Press
The Colima volcano in western Mexico erupted Saturday, sending a plume of smoke four miles into the air and forcing the evacuation of nearly 300 people from two states. The eruption, which happened at 12:45 p.m., spewed ash for two hours from the volcano, located 110 miles south of Guadalajara.
NEWS
August 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The Popocatepetl volcano released its greatest ash cloud since late June, when it blanketed Mexico City with ash and forced the closure of the capital's airport. Ash flew more than a mile into the sky, chief volcano monitor Roberto Quaas said. This latest blast may be a sign of more rumblings from the volcano southeast of the capital. "We think that in coming days there will be more frequent exhalations of this intensity, but it is no reason for alarm," Quaas said.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | From Reuters
Mexico's government on Thursday warned people living in the shadow of Popocatepetl volcano to prepare to flee after the mountain spat out red-hot rocks in a strong late-night eruption. An official at the Disaster Prevention Center's monitoring station said the 17,992-foot snowcapped volcano 33 miles southeast of Mexico City spewed blazing rocks out of its crater at 10:20 p.m.
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