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Volcanoes Montserrat

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NEWS
August 19, 1997 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soufriere Hills volcano on the British island of Montserrat in the Caribbean could soon erupt violently enough to overwhelm the entire 7-by-11-mile territory, scientists now believe. And a British Cabinet minister, declaring that a cataclysmic eruption cannot be ruled out, announced Monday that a voluntary evacuation of the island's 4,000 remaining residents will begin by ferry this week.
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NEWS
March 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Montserrat's newly revived volcano hurled glowing rocks into the sky, triggered fiery avalanches and shot a thundering ash cloud as high as 30,000 feet, scientists said. It was the largest explosion since the Soufriere Hills volcano on this British Caribbean island began belching out new rock in November after a silence of several months that had scientists predicting an end to four years of eruptions.
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NEWS
March 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Montserrat's newly revived volcano hurled glowing rocks into the sky, triggered fiery avalanches and shot a thundering ash cloud as high as 30,000 feet, scientists said. It was the largest explosion since the Soufriere Hills volcano on this British Caribbean island began belching out new rock in November after a silence of several months that had scientists predicting an end to four years of eruptions.
NEWS
November 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The new British governor, Anthony Abbott, gave about 100 islanders living in a danger zone on the west coast until Thursday to leave, saying Montserrat's volcano is threatening its biggest eruption yet. A major eruption earlier this year resulted in the death of 19 people. Richard Luckett, a British seismologist, said there was no new threat from the smoldering Soufriere Hills volcano, though a major explosion remains "a very real worry."
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dunes of fine gray ash drift on the deserted streets, clinging to collapsed roofs and shuttered doors and windows. When a misstep breaks the surface, the ash sinks like hot quicksand. The air smells scorched. Virtually the only sound is the creaking of the shingle-style signs of a dry-goods store and a tavern. A skinny brown dog bays, too frightened to be coaxed onto a nearby boat and safety.
NEWS
August 26, 1997 | From Reuters
The evacuation of this Caribbean island continued at a trickle Monday as government officials urged Britain to do more for those who want to stay in the volcano-ravaged colony. A group of families boarded a ferry for neighboring Antigua on Monday. Only a few dozen refugees left the island over the weekend. Antigua, where hundreds of Montserrat residents have taken refuge from the volcano, warned Britain that it could not accept more refugees except on a "very short-term basis."
NEWS
November 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The new British governor, Anthony Abbott, gave about 100 islanders living in a danger zone on the west coast until Thursday to leave, saying Montserrat's volcano is threatening its biggest eruption yet. A major eruption earlier this year resulted in the death of 19 people. Richard Luckett, a British seismologist, said there was no new threat from the smoldering Soufriere Hills volcano, though a major explosion remains "a very real worry."
NEWS
August 26, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The limits of science can be seen on tiny Montserrat, where uncertainty about if or when a volcano may explode has led authorities to evacuate two-thirds of the Caribbean island's 12,000 people to its north end or off the isle altogether. Since mid-July, experts from the United States, France and Trinidad and Tobago have been in the 11-by-7-mile colony, a British possession 250 miles southeast of Puerto Rico, monitoring the volcano. Experts are worried that it may blow soon.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Small eruptions shook the Soufriere Hills volcano on the island of Montserrat, and rescue workers found six bodies a day after a large eruption spewed tons of hot rock and ash. The six dead, all adults, were the first fatalities since the 3,000-foot volcano began erupting in July 1995. Rescuers in two helicopters searched for more than a dozen people believed trapped by this week's eruption.
NEWS
August 22, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These could be the last days of Montserrat. The volcano that long ago created the southern half of this British-ruled Caribbean island is now reclaiming it, crowding inhabitants into the northern tip and leaving the capital and other places under waist-high ash. An upscale tourist destination of lush landscapes that supported 11,000 residents until the Soufriere Hills volcano became active two years ago, Montserrat can no longer sustain even the 4,000 who have stayed.
NEWS
August 26, 1997 | From Reuters
The evacuation of this Caribbean island continued at a trickle Monday as government officials urged Britain to do more for those who want to stay in the volcano-ravaged colony. A group of families boarded a ferry for neighboring Antigua on Monday. Only a few dozen refugees left the island over the weekend. Antigua, where hundreds of Montserrat residents have taken refuge from the volcano, warned Britain that it could not accept more refugees except on a "very short-term basis."
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dunes of fine gray ash drift on the deserted streets, clinging to collapsed roofs and shuttered doors and windows. When a misstep breaks the surface, the ash sinks like hot quicksand. The air smells scorched. Virtually the only sound is the creaking of the shingle-style signs of a dry-goods store and a tavern. A skinny brown dog bays, too frightened to be coaxed onto a nearby boat and safety.
NEWS
August 22, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These could be the last days of Montserrat. The volcano that long ago created the southern half of this British-ruled Caribbean island is now reclaiming it, crowding inhabitants into the northern tip and leaving the capital and other places under waist-high ash. An upscale tourist destination of lush landscapes that supported 11,000 residents until the Soufriere Hills volcano became active two years ago, Montserrat can no longer sustain even the 4,000 who have stayed.
NEWS
August 19, 1997 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soufriere Hills volcano on the British island of Montserrat in the Caribbean could soon erupt violently enough to overwhelm the entire 7-by-11-mile territory, scientists now believe. And a British Cabinet minister, declaring that a cataclysmic eruption cannot be ruled out, announced Monday that a voluntary evacuation of the island's 4,000 remaining residents will begin by ferry this week.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Small eruptions shook the Soufriere Hills volcano on the island of Montserrat, and rescue workers found six bodies a day after a large eruption spewed tons of hot rock and ash. The six dead, all adults, were the first fatalities since the 3,000-foot volcano began erupting in July 1995. Rescuers in two helicopters searched for more than a dozen people believed trapped by this week's eruption.
NEWS
August 26, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The limits of science can be seen on tiny Montserrat, where uncertainty about if or when a volcano may explode has led authorities to evacuate two-thirds of the Caribbean island's 12,000 people to its north end or off the isle altogether. Since mid-July, experts from the United States, France and Trinidad and Tobago have been in the 11-by-7-mile colony, a British possession 250 miles southeast of Puerto Rico, monitoring the volcano. Experts are worried that it may blow soon.
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