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Volcanoes Nicaragua

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NEWS
April 13, 1992 | Reuters
Authorities on Sunday outlined the toll of destruction from a volcanic eruption three days earlier that forced thousands to flee their homes. The 3,220-foot Cerro Negro volcano, near the city of Leon in northwestern Nicaragua, rained fireballs and ash on nearby villages when it erupted late Thursday, knocking in the roofs of at least 40 homes. At least 10,000 peasants were evacuated from the area, and another 12,000 might have to be moved, Presidency Minister Antonio Lacayo said Sunday.
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NEWS
February 15, 2005 | Anne-Marie O'Connor
Any local guide will tell you, a climber should not attempt an ascent of Nicaragua's Concepcion volcano by its southern flank. It's too fragile, and volcanologists fear it will collapse someday, smothering the villages below and triggering a tsunami on Lake Nicaragua. Instead, trekkers are directed to the stony road through the banana plantation to the sage meadows of La Sabana, and from there, they can safely begin hiking. But when it comes to climbing a volcano, nothing is particularly safe.
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NEWS
April 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Under a rain of ashes and hot sand, 4,000 peasants fled the slopes of a 2,600-foot volcano that erupted unexpectedly in the northwest of the country after having been dormant for more than 20 years. Several people were injured when the roofs of their homes collapsed under the weight of ashes but no deaths were reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Southern California sisters were among 150 vacationers caught in a sudden volcanic eruption in Nicaragua, and one of them suffered a broken arm, according to accounts provided Wednesday by the sisters and the Holland America line. At least half of the tourists who experienced the April 23 eruption, some suffering cuts and bruises, were reported to be from California. They were on a one-day land tour off the cruise ship Veendam, which was docked at San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Southern California sisters were among 150 vacationers caught in a sudden volcanic eruption in Nicaragua, and one of them suffered a broken arm, according to accounts provided Wednesday by the sisters and the Holland America line. At least half of the tourists who experienced the April 23 eruption, some suffering cuts and bruises, were reported to be from California. They were on a one-day land tour off the cruise ship Veendam, which was docked at San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua.
NEWS
February 15, 2005 | Anne-Marie O'Connor
Any local guide will tell you, a climber should not attempt an ascent of Nicaragua's Concepcion volcano by its southern flank. It's too fragile, and volcanologists fear it will collapse someday, smothering the villages below and triggering a tsunami on Lake Nicaragua. Instead, trekkers are directed to the stony road through the banana plantation to the sage meadows of La Sabana, and from there, they can safely begin hiking. But when it comes to climbing a volcano, nothing is particularly safe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1998
Rising Sea Level The long-predicted rise in ocean levels due to global warming appears to be already affecting some low-lying islands of the Pacific Ocean. The Samoa-based Inter-government Agency told reporters that some culturally and spiritually important sites in the island chain were crumbling into the ocean. Farmers on many atolls are being forced to move their crops to what higher ground is available.
TRAVEL
December 28, 2003 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
ANCIENT Maya temples, mystical cloud forests, friendly folk and miles of beaches are just a few of the reasons American tourists go to Central America. Visiting the region was difficult in the 1980s and '90s because of civil wars in El Salvador, Guatemala and Nicaragua. Much of the region was unstable, its wonders lost to travelers.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | Reuters
Authorities on Sunday outlined the toll of destruction from a volcanic eruption three days earlier that forced thousands to flee their homes. The 3,220-foot Cerro Negro volcano, near the city of Leon in northwestern Nicaragua, rained fireballs and ash on nearby villages when it erupted late Thursday, knocking in the roofs of at least 40 homes. At least 10,000 peasants were evacuated from the area, and another 12,000 might have to be moved, Presidency Minister Antonio Lacayo said Sunday.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Under a rain of ashes and hot sand, 4,000 peasants fled the slopes of a 2,600-foot volcano that erupted unexpectedly in the northwest of the country after having been dormant for more than 20 years. Several people were injured when the roofs of their homes collapsed under the weight of ashes but no deaths were reported.
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