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Volcanoes Oregon

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NEWS
November 15, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it's not enough these days to have a Hawaiian volcano consuming communities, a Washington state volcano ominously shuddering and belching and a massive Alaskan volcano rumbling from the deep, scientists now have discovered a string of eight or so brand-new baby volcanoes off the coast of Oregon. In the inky waters almost 300 miles offshore and 1.5 miles underwater, a crack in the Earth's surface has brought forth fresh eruptions sometime within the last decade.
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NEWS
November 15, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it's not enough these days to have a Hawaiian volcano consuming communities, a Washington state volcano ominously shuddering and belching and a massive Alaskan volcano rumbling from the deep, scientists now have discovered a string of eight or so brand-new baby volcanoes off the coast of Oregon. In the inky waters almost 300 miles offshore and 1.5 miles underwater, a crack in the Earth's surface has brought forth fresh eruptions sometime within the last decade.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1988 | JOSEPH E. BROWN, Brown, a free-lance writer based in San Diego, is the former editor of Oceans magazine.
Oregon's deep and incredibly blue Crater Lake is more than 100 miles from the Pacific Ocean. One wouldn't think of this pristine, wooded mountain resource, set aside as a national park in 1902, as a place that would intrigue a seasoned oceanographer like Jack Dymond of Oregon State University. Dymond is far more accustomed to exploring the depths of the sea, as he was doing 8,000 feet down near the Galapagos Islands in 1977.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1988 | JOSEPH E. BROWN, Brown, a free-lance writer based in San Diego, is the former editor of Oceans magazine.
Oregon's deep and incredibly blue Crater Lake is more than 100 miles from the Pacific Ocean. One wouldn't think of this pristine, wooded mountain resource, set aside as a national park in 1902, as a place that would intrigue a seasoned oceanographer like Jack Dymond of Oregon State University. Dymond is far more accustomed to exploring the depths of the sea, as he was doing 8,000 feet down near the Galapagos Islands in 1977.
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