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Volcanoes Washington State

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NEWS
May 17, 1997 | Associated Press
Ever since Mt. St. Helens blew its top, visitors have craved a straight-on view into the crater. Now it's available, weather permitting, as the star attraction of a $10.5-million visitor center built into a ridge next to the volcano. The Johnston Ridge Observatory opens this weekend, 17 years after the volcano's deadly eruption on May 18, 1980. The mountaintop exploded with the force of a 24-megaton nuclear bomb, killing 57 people and devastating 230 square miles.
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NEWS
May 17, 1997 | Associated Press
Ever since Mt. St. Helens blew its top, visitors have craved a straight-on view into the crater. Now it's available, weather permitting, as the star attraction of a $10.5-million visitor center built into a ridge next to the volcano. The Johnston Ridge Observatory opens this weekend, 17 years after the volcano's deadly eruption on May 18, 1980. The mountaintop exploded with the force of a 24-megaton nuclear bomb, killing 57 people and devastating 230 square miles.
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NEWS
December 20, 1988
The Washington state Court of Appeals, noting there was no way to predict the timing or "staggering array of possible hazards" of the eruption of Mt. St. Helens, ruled the state of Washington is not liable for the deaths of 57 people killed in the volcano's explosion. The three-judge panel in Seattle upheld the October, 1985, dismissal of a suit against the state by representatives of 14 of the 57 people killed by the eruption.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | Associated Press
Mt. St. Helens shot off a plume of steam and gritty volcanic ash that rose to an elevation of 18,000 feet Tuesday, but it was not expected to pose any hazard, scientists said. The explosion was contained within the crater and there was no danger outside that area, they said.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | Associated Press
Mt. St. Helens shot off a plume of steam and gritty volcanic ash that rose to an elevation of 18,000 feet Tuesday, but it was not expected to pose any hazard, scientists said. The explosion was contained within the crater and there was no danger outside that area, they said.
NEWS
May 14, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People remember exactly what they were doing 10 years ago this May 18: getting ready for church, taking care of chores, sipping cups of coffee. Then, in the bright morning sky, what looked like a huge thunder cloud appeared. A volcanic eruption had lowered the summit of Mt. St. Helens by 1,312 feet. Within 10 minutes, an avalanche of volcanic debris plummeted 14 miles down a river valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1990 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, Essoyan is a free-lance writer based in Honolulu. and
Fiery tongues of lava from Kilauea Volcano have ravaged this coastal community. But compared to some of its cousins around the world, the Hawaiian volcano is downright polite. "At least it gives you time. It lets you take what you want, and you can watch it," said Leslie Doctor, who stood mesmerized as the searing lava bore down on his family's home.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | From United Press International
Mt. St. Helens blew off some steam and ash early Saturday, with the falling ash reported as far as 70 miles away, but officials reported no serious problems from the volcanic eruption. Seismographic readings indicated minor explosive activity during the two-minute eruption at the 8,365-foot volcanic mountain, Steve Malone of the University of Washington geophysics lab in Seattle said.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
Powerful radar waves from the space shuttle Endeavour sliced through clouds and sand Saturday to survey volcanoes and hunt for ancient river channels buried in the Sahara Desert. Endeavour's six astronauts described and photographed the scenes 138 miles below as the radar gathered three-dimensional images. Late Saturday, ground controllers aimed the $366-million radar at the Klyuchevsky Volcano in Russia's Far East. The volcano erupted Friday, perfect timing for Endeavour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1990 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, Essoyan is a free-lance writer based in Honolulu. and
Fiery tongues of lava from Kilauea Volcano have ravaged this coastal community. But compared to some of its cousins around the world, the Hawaiian volcano is downright polite. "At least it gives you time. It lets you take what you want, and you can watch it," said Leslie Doctor, who stood mesmerized as the searing lava bore down on his family's home.
NEWS
May 14, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People remember exactly what they were doing 10 years ago this May 18: getting ready for church, taking care of chores, sipping cups of coffee. Then, in the bright morning sky, what looked like a huge thunder cloud appeared. A volcanic eruption had lowered the summit of Mt. St. Helens by 1,312 feet. Within 10 minutes, an avalanche of volcanic debris plummeted 14 miles down a river valley.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | From United Press International
Mt. St. Helens blew off some steam and ash early Saturday, with the falling ash reported as far as 70 miles away, but officials reported no serious problems from the volcanic eruption. Seismographic readings indicated minor explosive activity during the two-minute eruption at the 8,365-foot volcanic mountain, Steve Malone of the University of Washington geophysics lab in Seattle said.
NEWS
December 20, 1988
The Washington state Court of Appeals, noting there was no way to predict the timing or "staggering array of possible hazards" of the eruption of Mt. St. Helens, ruled the state of Washington is not liable for the deaths of 57 people killed in the volcano's explosion. The three-judge panel in Seattle upheld the October, 1985, dismissal of a suit against the state by representatives of 14 of the 57 people killed by the eruption.
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