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Volga Auto Works

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BUSINESS
June 8, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what it billed as the first significant working relationship between an American auto company and the Soviet Union in the post-World War II era, General Motors said Thursday that it has agreed to sell nearly $1 billion worth of automotive parts to that country's largest auto maker. GM's announcement comes just days after Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev publicly criticized American auto makers for not taking a more active role in developing bilateral relationships with his nation.
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BUSINESS
June 8, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what it billed as the first significant working relationship between an American auto company and the Soviet Union in the post-World War II era, General Motors said Thursday that it has agreed to sell nearly $1 billion worth of automotive parts to that country's largest auto maker. GM's announcement comes just days after Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev publicly criticized American auto makers for not taking a more active role in developing bilateral relationships with his nation.
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BUSINESS
June 7, 1990 | From United Press International
General Motors Corp. announced today it has signed a nearly $1-billion agreement to provide anti-pollution equipment to Volga Auto Works, or VAZ, the leading vehicle manufacturer in the Soviet Union. The agreement will enable GM to become the first American-based auto manufacturer in modern times to establish a working relationship with the Soviet auto industry, GM said.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1990 | From United Press International
General Motors Corp. announced today it has signed a nearly $1-billion agreement to provide anti-pollution equipment to Volga Auto Works, or VAZ, the leading vehicle manufacturer in the Soviet Union. The agreement will enable GM to become the first American-based auto manufacturer in modern times to establish a working relationship with the Soviet auto industry, GM said.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American companies with investments in the Soviet Union were closely monitoring their operations Monday, while analysts said the coup that toppled President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was unlikely to have a significant impact on the U.S. economy. For the moment at least, most U.S. companies were continuing to do business--albeit with caution.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. companies with investments in the Soviet Union said the political coup that toppled reform-minded President Mikhal S. Gorbachev hadn't disrupted business Monday. McDonald's was open and selling cheeseburgers at a normal clip, and General Motors pressed ahead with its plans to develop engine parts for a Soviet auto maker. But analysts said the coup would almost certainly cast a pall over future investment in the Soviet Union, even if it fails and Gorbachev again rises to power.
NEWS
March 1, 1994 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The automobile is a century old and showing no signs of putting on the brakes. More than 600 million vehicles roam the roads--from Germany's high-speed autobahns and America's interstates to the gridlocked streets of Thailand and unpaved byways of interior Brazil. Last year about 50 million cars, trucks and other vehicles--an average of 135,000 each day--were driven off the world's production lines. Two-thirds came from U.S.
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