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WORLD
January 30, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Two suicide bombers whose attacks last month in Volgograd raised fears of terrorist strikes in Russia during the coming Olympic Games have been identified and two accomplices arrested, authorities said Thursday. The two bombers struck the Volgograd's railroad station Dec. 29 and a crowded trolley bus the next day, killing 34 people in all. The city is about 400 miles northeast of Sochi, site of the Games, and near the Caucasus region, which has long been a battleground between Islamist militants and security forces.
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WORLD
February 5, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW -- U.S. warnings that terrorists might try to smuggle explosives aboard Russia-bound flights have added to fears of attacks ahead of Friday's opening of the Winter Olympics in Sochi. The Department of Homeland Security has alerted airlines flying to Russia that they should be on the lookout for toothpaste and cosmetics tubes that might be used to hide explosive substances, Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Texas), chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, told U.S. news media on Wednesday.
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WORLD
December 29, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - A suicide bomber detonated explosives at the entrance to a railway station in Volgograd, an industrial city in southern Russia, killing at least 15 people and injuring 43, officials said, in an attack that sent jitters through the country as the Winter Olympics in Sochi approach. No group claimed responsibility for Sunday's deadly bombing, one of several to hit southern Russian in recent months. Volgograd is close to the troubled Caucasus region, where Chechen rebel leader Doku Umarov has vowed to use "maximum force" to prevent Russia from staging the Olympics, which he called "satanic games held on the bones of our ancestors.
SPORTS
February 4, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia - As his plane approached Sochi-Adler International Airport, flying low over the coast, Erik Guay glanced out the window. Warships sat anchored on the Black Sea below. "That's the first sight you get," the Canadian skier said. "In a way, it makes you feel safe. " Security has been a major concern leading up to the 2014 Sochi Olympics. These Games are considered particularly vulnerable to terrorist attacks because of their proximity to the North Caucasus, a region where Islamic militants have waged a violent insurgency.
WORLD
January 19, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- A radical Islamist group operating clandestinely in Russia's North Caucasus took responsibility Sunday for the two suicide bombings that rocked the industrial center of Volgograd late last year. Ansar al Sunna posted a 50-minute video on the extremist website Vilayat Dagestan that showed two young men -- called Suleiman and Abdurakhim in the video credits -- allegedly preparing to carry out the attacks. Dressed in black T-shirts with Kalashnikov rifles in their hands, the two sit praying in front of a black flag with white letters in Arabic.
WORLD
December 30, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details
MOSCOW - At least 14 people were killed and 28 injured Monday in the second suspected suicide bombing in the southern Russian city of Volgograd in as many days, heightening concern about security at the upcoming Winter Olympic Games in Sochi. Ten passengers were killed instantly when a bomb exploded Monday morning on a crowded trolley bus, and four more died on the way to and in hospitals, officials said. Russian law enforcement agencies said the explosion was a terrorist attack and that they suspected a connection with a suicide bombing less than 19 hours earlier at Volgograd's main railway station.
WORLD
December 30, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- At least 14 people were killed and 28 injured Monday morning by a suspected suicide bomb attack on a crowded trolley bus in the Russian city of Volgograd -- the second such attack on mass transit in the city in as many days. Ten passengers were killed immediately from the blast and four more died on the way to and in hospitals, officials said. Russian law enforcement agencies said the explosion was a terrorist act and that they suspect a connection between Monday's attack and a suicide bombing on Sunday, less than 19 hours earlier, at the city's main railway station.
WORLD
December 30, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
With a little more than 400 miles between them, Volgograd is as far from the southern Russian resort of Sochi as Los Angeles is from Lake Tahoe. But for the purpose of sowing fear throughout Russia and among foreign athletes and spectators headed to the Olympic Games in the next few weeks, the suspected twin suicide bombings in the Volga River city were close enough to the sporting venue for the Islamic separatists presumed to be behind them....
NEWS
February 5, 1985 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Josef Stalin, who is rarely mentioned in public here, won high praise Monday from an official Soviet spokesman at a briefing on the 40th anniversary of the controversial Yalta Conference during World War II. Foreign Ministry spokesman Vladimir B. Lomeiko portrayed Stalin as a dedicated peacemaker in the decisions taken at the Feb. 4-11, 1945, Yalta Conference.
WORLD
February 5, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW -- U.S. warnings that terrorists might try to smuggle explosives aboard Russia-bound flights have added to fears of attacks ahead of Friday's opening of the Winter Olympics in Sochi. The Department of Homeland Security has alerted airlines flying to Russia that they should be on the lookout for toothpaste and cosmetics tubes that might be used to hide explosive substances, Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Texas), chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, told U.S. news media on Wednesday.
WORLD
January 30, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Two suicide bombers whose attacks last month in Volgograd raised fears of terrorist strikes in Russia during the coming Olympic Games have been identified and two accomplices arrested, authorities said Thursday. The two bombers struck the Volgograd's railroad station Dec. 29 and a crowded trolley bus the next day, killing 34 people in all. The city is about 400 miles northeast of Sochi, site of the Games, and near the Caucasus region, which has long been a battleground between Islamist militants and security forces.
WORLD
January 19, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- A radical Islamist group operating clandestinely in Russia's North Caucasus took responsibility Sunday for the two suicide bombings that rocked the industrial center of Volgograd late last year. Ansar al Sunna posted a 50-minute video on the extremist website Vilayat Dagestan that showed two young men -- called Suleiman and Abdurakhim in the video credits -- allegedly preparing to carry out the attacks. Dressed in black T-shirts with Kalashnikov rifles in their hands, the two sit praying in front of a black flag with white letters in Arabic.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Security concerns have been entwined with the planning for every Olympiad at least since Munich 1972. The horrific events in Volgograd in recent days are only a reminder that the Sochi Winter Olympics will open some five weeks from now in a frighteningly unstable part of the former Soviet empire.  The North Caucasus, as two prominent critics of the Olympics project have written, is " a region with a traditionally high terrorist threat level....
WORLD
December 30, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- At least 14 people were killed and 28 injured Monday morning by a suspected suicide bomb attack on a crowded trolley bus in the Russian city of Volgograd -- the second such attack on mass transit in the city in as many days. Ten passengers were killed immediately from the blast and four more died on the way to and in hospitals, officials said. Russian law enforcement agencies said the explosion was a terrorist act and that they suspect a connection between Monday's attack and a suicide bombing on Sunday, less than 19 hours earlier, at the city's main railway station.
WORLD
December 30, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details
MOSCOW - At least 14 people were killed and 28 injured Monday in the second suspected suicide bombing in the southern Russian city of Volgograd in as many days, heightening concern about security at the upcoming Winter Olympic Games in Sochi. Ten passengers were killed instantly when a bomb exploded Monday morning on a crowded trolley bus, and four more died on the way to and in hospitals, officials said. Russian law enforcement agencies said the explosion was a terrorist attack and that they suspected a connection with a suicide bombing less than 19 hours earlier at Volgograd's main railway station.
WORLD
December 30, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
With a little more than 400 miles between them, Volgograd is as far from the southern Russian resort of Sochi as Los Angeles is from Lake Tahoe. But for the purpose of sowing fear throughout Russia and among foreign athletes and spectators headed to the Olympic Games in the next few weeks, the suspected twin suicide bombings in the Volga River city were close enough to the sporting venue for the Islamic separatists presumed to be behind them....
BUSINESS
December 30, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Security concerns have been entwined with the planning for every Olympiad at least since Munich 1972. The horrific events in Volgograd in recent days are only a reminder that the Sochi Winter Olympics will open some five weeks from now in a frighteningly unstable part of the former Soviet empire.  The North Caucasus, as two prominent critics of the Olympics project have written, is " a region with a traditionally high terrorist threat level....
WORLD
December 29, 2013 | By Sergei Loiko
MOSCOW - At least 14 people were killed and 43 injured in a suicide bombing Sunday afternoon at the railway station in Volgograd, an industrial city in southern Russia, officials said. Shortly after 1 p.m. local time, a woman approached a metal detector frame at the railway station's entrance, where she stopped and detonated the explosives after a police officer started walking toward her, authorities said. "When the suicide bomber saw the metal detector frame and saw the policemen on duty as she entered the railway station, she got nervous and her behavior seemed suspicious to the policemen," Interior Ministry spokesman Andrei Pilipchuk told Rossiya-24, a news television network.
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