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Volkswagen Ag

BUSINESS
November 9, 2001 | Associated Press
Volkswagen announced it was laying off 3,000 workers at one of its main Brazilian automobile factories, or 19% of the workers employed at the facility, after unions rejected a management proposal to save jobs by reducing hours and pay. Volkswagen Brazil said 3,000 of the 16,000 workers at its Anchieta factory in Sao Paulo's industrial hinterland would be laid off Monday. VW employs about 28,000 people in Brazil.
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BUSINESS
September 9, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 19 days on strike against Volkswagen, unionized workers have won a victory that goes beyond the paycheck. The Volkswagen workers--the largest automotive union in Mexico--got a 14.7% increase in wages and benefits, more than double the rate of inflation. The settlement reflected labor's increasing muscle, which could grow with reforms that President Vicente Fox hopes to present to Congress in the next several months.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2001 | EMILIO FERNANDEZ, REUTERS
Volkswagen and Mexican union leaders Wednesday reached a wage deal to end a 19-day strike that halted production at the only factory making the German auto maker's popular New Beetle. After a marathon negotiating session, the two sides struck a pre-dawn accord that gave the 12,322 union workers at Volkswagen's Mexico plant a 10.2% wage increase. It also included an increase in food coupon benefits equivalent to 3.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2001 | BURT HERMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Deals to hire employees without all the treasured perks given German workers normally would cause an outcry from unions, but a plan by Volkswagen to do just that is getting uniform support--as a means to encourage flexibility and fight unemployment. VW, Europe's largest auto maker, agreed Tuesday to hire 3,500 workers to produce a new minivan in its home base of Wolfsburg.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2001 | From Reuters
Union leaders at the Mexican unit of Volkswagen said Tuesday that the German auto maker improved its pay offer in a bid to end a 10-day-old strike, but many workers reacted negatively as they began voting on the package. Union leaders presented VW's new offer of an 8.5% salary increase plus improved benefits worth an additional 1.7% of their wages to an assembly of workers at the VW plant in Puebla, about 60 miles east of Mexico City.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2001 | From Reuters
Workers at Volkswagen's only plant in Mexico failed to reach agreement with the German auto maker on a new contract Sunday, pushing a strike into its second day and suspending production of the New Beetle model. About 12,500 unionized workers demanding a 21% pay increase walked out at the Puebla plant Saturday. Workers expect an offer from the company today. The plant in Puebla is the only Volkswagen facility worldwide to produce the New Beetle.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2001 | Associated Press
The European Union's head office fined Volkswagen, Europe's biggest auto maker, $27 million in the wake of a price-fixing investigation. The fine resulted from findings that VW pressured German dealers into dropping rebates to customers who bought the redesigned Passat from 1996 to 1999, making the cars among the most expensive in Europe. Dealers allegedly were threatened with the termination of dealer contracts if they failed to maintain prices for the model.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2000 | Associated Press
Workers at Volkswagen of Mexico won a pay raise substantially higher than the rate of inflation, in a settlement that's likely to encourage other Mexican unions fighting to recover the buying power workers have lost over more than a decade of austerity policies. The workers won a 21% overall increase, consisting of a 13% wage hike, a 5% increase in productivity incentives, 2% in loans and 1% in aid for school supplies for workers' children, a union spokesman said.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2000 | Reuters
A new attempt to reach a pay deal between workers and German car maker Volkswagen's Mexican unit was abandoned without agreement, a union representative said. Smarting after the government last week declared its strike illegal, the union representing 12,600 workers at Volkswagen's only plant producing the popular New Beetle had cut its demand for a pay increase to 17% from 20%.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers at Volkswagen's only North American assembly plant agreed Wednesday to a federal order to end their five-day strike. But the walkout sent a strong signal that Mexican labor won't be as docile in the years ahead as it was under the thumb of past governments. A Labor Ministry arbitration board late Tuesday declared the strike illegal on technical grounds and ordered the 12,600-strong work force to return their jobs by midnight Wednesday and to abandon their strike for higher wages.
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