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BUSINESS
November 10, 2011
2012 Volkswagen Beetle 2.5 Base price: $19,765 (including destination) Price, as tested: $25,965 Powertrain: 2.5-liter, DOHC, inline five-cylinder engine; six-speed automatic transmission with manual and sport modes Horsepower: 170 at 5,700 rpm Torque: 177 pound-feet at 4,250 rpm 0 to 60: 8.8 seconds (according to Motor Trend magazine) Curb weight: 2,983 pounds Wheelbase: 99.9 inches Overall length: 168.4 inches EPA fuel economy: 20 mpg city/29 mpg highway Final thoughts: The Beetle shifts into gender-neutral
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AUTOS
January 31, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
It's hard not to spot an import brand car on American roads. That wasn't always the case, Volkswagen reminds us as it commemorated the shipment of the first Beetle to New York City 65 years ago. Back in January 1949, Volkswagen delivered a VW “Type 1,” or Beetle, to Ben Pon Sr., a Dutch businessman and the world's first official Volkswagen importer. “It made inroads very tentatively selling only two that first year and then seemed to burst like wildfire,” said Leslie Kendall, curator of the Petersen Automotive Museum.
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AUTOS
January 31, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
It's hard not to spot an import brand car on American roads. That wasn't always the case, Volkswagen reminds us as it commemorated the shipment of the first Beetle to New York City 65 years ago. Back in January 1949, Volkswagen delivered a VW “Type 1,” or Beetle, to Ben Pon Sr., a Dutch businessman and the world's first official Volkswagen importer. “It made inroads very tentatively selling only two that first year and then seemed to burst like wildfire,” said Leslie Kendall, curator of the Petersen Automotive Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
It would be impossible to count the number of automotive makes and models that have come and gone since the car was first invented - or the number of books that have been written about them. The inescapable ubiquity of the automobile has made them, for better or worse, a sort of cultural fodder that Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Ingrassia inventively exploits in "Engines of Change. " The question at the center of his nonfiction treatise: Do cars shape the culture, or does culture shape the cars?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
Ferdinand Porsche Jr., who helped his father develop the Volkswagen Beetle before World War II and later founded the sports car firm that bears his name, died Friday at age 88. Porsche died surrounded by his family at their vacation home in the resort town of Zell am See, the company's Salzburg office said. Born in Vienna in 1909, Porsche was involved with cars from childhood, driving his own small auto at age 10. "I came into the world at the same time as the auto, if you will," he once said.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1998
Is the new Volkswagen Beetle's bulbous wide girth ["VW's New Version of 'Bug' Off to a Fast Start in the U.S.," Feb. 26] meant to symbolize the current shape of its former yuppie owners? HOWIE KEEFE Marina del Rey
NEWS
March 18, 1998
Re Paul Dean's review, "The New Beetle: 23 Smiles Per Gallon" (Feb. 19): I moved to Southern California in 1968 at a time when the Volkswagen Beetle was truly the "in" car. Its owners defended the product with a religion-like fervor. They tended to be an independent, rebellious crowd who reveled in their intellectual choice. Beetle ownership wasn't a product selection, it was a philosophical statement. In those days Everyman paid the same for his Beetle--the suggested retail price.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Volkswagen Beetle, the much-loved and fondly remembered car that disappeared from auto showrooms more than a decade ago, may be coming back to U.S. markets. If Americans like the idea, a sleek futuristic version--complete with convertible top and environmental controls--could be sold in the United States as early as 1997. The German auto maker is tapping into American nostalgia to reverse a sharp decline in its overall U.S.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1994
An updated version of the famed Volkswagen Beetle designed by the German car maker's Simi Valley design studio will be on the market by the end of the decade, Volkswagen A.G. recently announced. The price of the car and the number that will be produced were not disclosed, but the company said that the United States will be one of the primary markets for the new car. "We're over the moon," said Charles Ellwood, head of the Simi Valley studio, using an expression imported from his native England.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch
Beetles and Rogues are for chicks, 911s and F-series trucks are for dudes. That's the finding of TrueCar.com's study of new-vehicle buying preferences by gender. "Female car buyers really gravitated toward smaller, more fuel-efficient cars and crossovers," said Kristen Andersson, a TrueCar analyst. "It was the complete opposite for male buyers, who preferred either a fast and sporty vehicle with distinctive curb appeal or a big vehicle, like a large truck or SUV. " The Volvo S40 had the highest percentage of women buyers, 57.9%.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch
Beetles and Rogues are for chicks, 911s and F-series trucks are for dudes. That's the finding of TrueCar.com's study of new-vehicle buying preferences by gender. "Female car buyers really gravitated toward smaller, more fuel-efficient cars and crossovers," said Kristen Andersson, a TrueCar analyst. "It was the complete opposite for male buyers, who preferred either a fast and sporty vehicle with distinctive curb appeal or a big vehicle, like a large truck or SUV. " The Volvo S40 had the highest percentage of women buyers, 57.9%.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2011
2012 Volkswagen Beetle 2.5 Base price: $19,765 (including destination) Price, as tested: $25,965 Powertrain: 2.5-liter, DOHC, inline five-cylinder engine; six-speed automatic transmission with manual and sport modes Horsepower: 170 at 5,700 rpm Torque: 177 pound-feet at 4,250 rpm 0 to 60: 8.8 seconds (according to Motor Trend magazine) Curb weight: 2,983 pounds Wheelbase: 99.9 inches Overall length: 168.4 inches EPA fuel economy: 20 mpg city/29 mpg highway Final thoughts: The Beetle shifts into gender-neutral
SPORTS
May 1, 2011 | By John Scheibe
The red 1963 Volkswagen convertible in the "For Sale" ad appears to be a cherry version of the automaker's popular Beetle. It has chrome bumpers, a black cloth top and a bright finish to its paint. The rims are shiny and the tires barely worn. The trim little California car looks ready to drive to the beach or cruise down the Sunset Strip on a Saturday night. But buckle your seatbelt before you get to the asking price — $250,000. Obviously, this is no ordinary Volkswagen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2009 | Nicole Santa Cruz and Andrew Blankstein
A Westchester man who allegedly threatened to blow up the White House held police at bay for nearly eight hours Thursday as he sat parked in his car at the Federal Building in Westwood and was finally subdued when lawmen shattered a window, Tasered him and dragged him out of the vehicle. The man, who authorities identified as Joseph Moshe, 56, of Westchester, initially fled from U.S. Secret Service agents who had attempted to arrest him near his home. Moshe fled in his bright red Volkswagen Beetle and parked in front of the Federal Building.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2002
I found Dave Hickey's essay ("Americans and cars: Love runs out of gas," Oct. 13) an insightful look into our present-day predicament with what he sees as our automotive love life. At the same time, I think his view of our recent exhibition of automobiles is overly influenced by his apparent anguish at discovering his car doesn't love him anymore. Where, he asks, are "any of the cars we loved as works of art or any vehicle at all that might have been paid out on time by a member of the middle class?"
MAGAZINE
March 3, 2002 | Preston Lerner
Freeman Thomas is bombing down the express lane of the 405. As DaimlerChrysler's vice president of advanced product design strategy, you'd expect him to be driving a company car--a Chrysler sedan, say, or a Dodge pickup, or a Jeep Wrangler like the one he uses every day back home in Michigan. Instead, his once-a-month visit to the company's advanced design center in Carlsbad finds him in a generic rental car, and he's not happy about it. Not because the econobox is beneath him.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2002
I found Dave Hickey's essay ("Americans and cars: Love runs out of gas," Oct. 13) an insightful look into our present-day predicament with what he sees as our automotive love life. At the same time, I think his view of our recent exhibition of automobiles is overly influenced by his apparent anguish at discovering his car doesn't love him anymore. Where, he asks, are "any of the cars we loved as works of art or any vehicle at all that might have been paid out on time by a member of the middle class?"
BUSINESS
November 26, 1994 | From Reuters
A new generation Volkswagen Beetle is moving closer to a return to the U.S. market, where it could re-establish the auto maker's reputation for building cheap, spunky transportation, analysts said Friday. Volkswagen's supervisory board met Friday and may have approved the program, which calls for the all-new front wheel-drive vehicle to be built in Mexico for sale in the United States, Canada, Mexico and possibly elsewhere in Latin America.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lime-green VW Bug squatted in the middle of the electric-vehicle parking area, as conspicuously out of place as a fat cockroach in the center of a snow-white linen tablecloth. Obviously a joker pulling a fast one on the parking police at the crowded MainPlace/Santa Ana mall by sticking the electric charger plug under the 2000 New Beetle's gasoline filler cover. But no. A closer inspection revealed that it was, indeed, an electric Beetle.
NEWS
March 17, 1999 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not the idea of the new Ford Excursion that bugs Michael Hasenfratz. It's the physical reality of the 4-ton SUV someday squashing him like a bug--inside his new 1-ton Volkswagen Bug--that does. "Already when the SUVs zoom past, my car kind of shakes," says Hasenfratz, a 19-year-old student at Moorpark College. "And now they are making one bigger than the [Ford] Expedition? I better watch out." It's not easy driving a compact car in a sport-utility vehicle world.
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