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Volt Information Sciences Inc

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BUSINESS
January 26, 2000
A subsidiary of Volt Information Sciences Inc. in Orange received a contract to provide information-technology personnel for an El Segundo computer services company. Financial terms with Computer Sciences Corp. weren't disclosed. Volt Information, a staffing services company, said in a press release Monday its Volt Services Group unit will serve Computer Sciences as one of three preferred suppliers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1991 | JAMES GOMEZ and ROSE APODACA
A telephone maintenance worker was set afire early Friday morning by a freak fireball that burst from a manhole when his partner lifted the cover, police said. Michael R. Gramer, 33, of Bakersfield suffered second- and third-degree burns over much of his body in the 5 a.m. accident, Costa Mesa Police Lt. Gary Webster said. He was in critical condition at the UCI Medical Center burn ward in Orange, hospital spokeswoman Fran Tardiff said. Gramer and co-worker Brad J.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1994 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you work for a small company, Marvin R. Selter, or someone like him, may someday be your boss. Selter, the CEO of Van Nuys-based National Staff Network, runs one of hundreds of firms in the fast-growing business of employee leasing. The idea is simple: Rather than wrestle with tax forms and other payroll hassles on their own, companies unload their workers to a staff-leasing company, which then leases them back for a fee.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1989 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
It was the summer of 1987, and the executives of Butler Service Group, one of the country's biggest suppliers of temporary technical help, faced a dilemma. A big customer, GTE California, announced that it would shift a substantial share of its business to firms run by minorities as a result of pressure from the California Legislature. Butler, operated by white men and owned by a company traded in the over-the-counter stock market, had a choice.
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