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October 20, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Beats by Dre is the latest company to enter the portable Bluetooth speaker market, going into the ring with its challenger: the Pill. And Beats delivers. Earlier this week, the Santa Monica company famous for its line of headphones announced and started selling the Pill, which goes for $199.95. The Pill is unsurprisingly shaped like a gel capsule and looks like a perfect circle when viewed from the side. On the front, there's a button stylized to Beats' famous logo, which is used as a Bluetooth sync button.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Los Angeles' chief surveyor stood above the newly unearthed brick and mortar pipe and carefully opened a 127-year-old leather book. "Here is the pipe. It's exactly where they said it was in 1887," said Tony Pratt, carefully pointing to a hand-drawn map in the ancient field guide. Freddie Eaton was the chief surveyor back then, the field guide noted. Eaton would eventually go on to become the city's mayor and a prominent figure in the expansion of L.A. Pratt pulled the old city surveyor's field report from city archives this week after reading a news account about the discovery of a remnant of the original Zanja Madre - the town's original water network - beneath a Chinatown construction site.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By Meg James
CALM wasn't easy to achieve. CALM Act, the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation law, which limits the volume of TV commercials, took effect Thursday. It requires broadcasters to ensure that TV commercials maintain the same volume as the entertainment programming in which they are contained. The legislative effort was begun more than four years ago by Rep. Anna G. Eshoo (D-Menlo Park), who was blasted by blaring ads on TV during a family holiday gathering. “This has been a top consumer complaint for decades,” Eshoo said during a news conference Thursday in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Steve Appleford
During four decades, Annie Leibovitz has been a dominant force in portrait photography, first at Rolling Stone and then with increasing skill and vision at Vanity Fair and Vogue. At 64, Leibovitz works hard at it still and isn't ready for a broad career retrospective but takes a look back at some of her most lasting images in "Annie Leibovitz," a huge limited-edition book from Taschen. In the tradition of Helmut Newton's "SUMO," the new volume is about 20-by-27 inches and 476 pages deep.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012
MGM had great success with several movie franchises in the 1930s and '40s, including "The Thin Man" with William Powell and Myrna Loy, the Andy Hardy family comedies with Mickey Rooney and the Dr. Kildare medical dramas with Lew Ayres and Lionel Barrymore. The studio hit pay dirt again in 1939, when blond, brassy and endearing Ann Sothern was cast as a good-hearted honky tonk singer named Maisie Ravier. The first in the series, "Maisie" found her in the Wild West and falling in love with Robert Young.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Beatles fans will soon have access to another batch of the recordings the Fab Four made for airing by the BBC from 1962 to 1965 with the Nov. 11 release of “The Beatles: On Air - Live at the BBC Volume 2.” The new set, a companion to the 1994 release of “Live at the BBC,” will consist of 63 tracks on 2 CDs, including 37 previously unreleased song performances and 23 unreleased tracks with conversation and in-studio banter by the Beatles....
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Robert Abele
The gurgling caldron of Z-grade schlock that has always been outlier film company Troma's point of pride is on full display in the vigorously offensive comedy "Return to Nuke 'Em High Volume 1. " Part sequel, part update and, well, part part - Volume 2 is to come - this movie revisits the environmental satire of Troma's 1986 "Class of Nuke 'Em High," but replaces that era's nuclear hazard riffing with modern-day fears about contaminated food....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Whatever you might say about Simon Schama, one of our most prominent and accomplished narrative historians, you can't say he's afraid to tackle broad and challenging subjects. "The Story of the Jews" is the first of a two-volume work aimed at covering 3 millenniums, from 1000 BCE to the present day, with the break coming at 1492 and the expulsion of the Jews from Spain by Ferdinand and Isabella. That's a lot of ground to cover, greater geographically if not in chronological terms than Schama's last multi-volume work, a three-tome "History of Britain" published in 2000-02 that reached all the way back to 3500 BC. Like that work, the scale of "The Story of the Jews" was dictated by the requirement of a television documentary series, scheduled to begin airing on PBS toward the end of this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Passage of Power The Years of Lyndon Johnson Robert Caro Alfred A. Knopf: 736 pp., $35 "The Passage of Power," the fourth volume in Robert Caro's epic biography of Lyndon Baines Johnson, encompasses the period of LBJ's deepest humiliation and his greatest accomplishment. It is a searing account of ambition derailed by personal demons in Johnson's unsuccessful bid for the 1960 Democratic presidential nomination. It is a painful depiction of "greatness comically humbled" when Johnson gave up his unbridled authority as Senate majority leader to becomeJohn F. Kennedy's disdained vice president.
NEWS
July 15, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
A teaspoon is a teaspoon is a teaspoon … right? Not exactly, as researchers tested several household spoons used to give medicine, finding wide variations in capacity. The study took place in Attica, Greece, where 25 women allowed their teaspoons (71 total) and tablespoons (49 total) to be measured. A standard teaspoon measure is about 5 milliliters, and a tablespoon is about 14.9 milliliters. The teaspoons the researchers collected had capacities ranging from 2.5 ml to 7.3 ml. The volume of the various tablespoons ranged from 6.7 ml to 13.4 ml. Some homes had a variety of spoons with different volumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
Picking up the story from the first film with little more than a title card - no "previously on" recap here - Danish filmmaker Lars von Trier jumps right back into it with "Nymphomaniac: Volume II" as Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg) continues to recount her life as a sex addict to the man (Stellan Skarsgård) who found her slumped in the street and took her in. In "Volume II," Von Trier reveals that his "Nymphomaniac" project could also be called "The Hunger Games" for the way in which it explores the boundaries of need and want and the play between desire and demand.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - The federal government's online health insurance marketplace stumbled Monday as tens of thousands of Americans streamed to the HealthCare.gov website seeking to beat a midnight deadline for enrolling in coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Technicians were able to get the site back online after it went down in the early morning hours Monday, according to federal officials. But by midday, visitors to the site were getting an automated message alerting them that high volumes made it necessary to wait to set up an account or enroll in coverage.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Chad Terhune and Soumya Karlamangla
Strong consumer interest in Obamacare coverage ahead of Monday's enrollment deadline was leading to long waits and website trouble for some Californians. The Covered California exchange said sign-ups have been building throughout the week with about 80,000 people picking a health plan Monday through Thursday. An additional 150,000 households created an online account and started the shopping process in the last three days, officials said. That heavy volume was creating havoc, confusion and delays for many consumers, enrollment counselors and insurance agents trying to use the exchange's website.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
She shuffled and jerked. She collapsed on the Wiltern stage like a marionette, got up and then quickly dropped again. During "St. Johnny," the artist Annie Clark, her stark white hair jutting up and out, slithered and posed on stage stairs in overwrought exhaustion.   And through it all the versatile artist, who performs as St. Vincent, didn't miss a beat, whether ruling the upper ranges during vocal runs -- "people turn the TV on it looks just like a window," she offered on "Digital Witness" -- or barking out declarations and confessions, whether offering quick synchronized dance moves or pouring forth oft-dissonant, breathtaking guitar solos and distorted, metal-esque riffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
Danish filmmaker Lars von Trier understands the art and craft of making movies, the power the form is capable of combined with the skill and means to achieve it, about as well as anyone working in the world today. He also seems to believe in cinema as an apparatus for the creation of bad feelings, a means for exploring the bleakest of human emotions and the darkest corners of our souls. Lucky us? Even the title of his latest film, "Nymphomaniac: Volume 1," seems some odd combo of put-on and provocation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
AUSTIN, Texas -- As the South by Southwest music festival nears its end, quiet begins to beckon. It's the natural result of having been assaulted by noise -- in clubs and concert halls, but also simply walking down many streets here -- for four long days in a row. Eventually, inevitably, the ear requires relief. I found some Friday night, on the next-to-last evening of full programming at SXSW, in performances by London Grammar and Mark Kozelek. The latter show offered another welcome element: somewhere to sit. A young British trio that's already achieved big success at home, where it was nominated last month for a prize at the U.K.'s Grammy-equivalent Brit Awards, London Grammar plays hushed, electronic-edged love songs that can suggest Dido fronting the xx. And it was working hard in Austin to bring some of that buzz to an American audience, with five gigs over the course of four days, including a slot opening for Coldplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
You're not necessarily a history geek if you shed a tear during Steven Spielberg's excellent biopic “Lincoln,” which relates the struggle to pass the 13th Amendment to the Constitution and forever outlaw slavery. However, you are most certainly a history geek if you cry during the film's opening 15 minutes, when President Lincoln, played by Daniel Day-Lewis, listens to three young Union soldiers recite the Gettysburg Address back to him. That happened to me, Hector Tobar, proud U.S. history geek.
AUTOS
February 19, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Here are the five questions Tesla Motors Chief Executive Elon Musk needs to answer when the electric car company releases its fourth quarter and full-year financial results Wednesday afternoon. 1. Is a merger with Apple coming? Musk met with Adrian Perica, a former Goldman Sachs investment banker who heads Apple's mergers-and-acquisitions team, last year. Might Tesla -- and its astounding $25-billion market valuation for what really is a very small company -- be in play?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Whatever you might say about Simon Schama, one of our most prominent and accomplished narrative historians, you can't say he's afraid to tackle broad and challenging subjects. "The Story of the Jews" is the first of a two-volume work aimed at covering 3 millenniums, from 1000 BCE to the present day, with the break coming at 1492 and the expulsion of the Jews from Spain by Ferdinand and Isabella. That's a lot of ground to cover, greater geographically if not in chronological terms than Schama's last multi-volume work, a three-tome "History of Britain" published in 2000-02 that reached all the way back to 3500 BC. Like that work, the scale of "The Story of the Jews" was dictated by the requirement of a television documentary series, scheduled to begin airing on PBS toward the end of this month.
AUTOS
February 19, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Here are the five questions Tesla Motors Chief Executive Elon Musk needs to answer when the electric car company releases its fourth quarter and full-year financial results Wednesday afternoon. 1. Is a merger with Apple coming? Musk met with Adrian Perica, a former Goldman Sachs investment banker who heads Apple's mergers-and-acquisitions team, last year. Might Tesla -- and its astounding $25-billion market valuation for what really is a very small company -- be in play?
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