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TRAVEL
October 11, 1987 | ERIC FRIEDHEIM, Friedheim is editor/publisher of Travel Agent magazine.
Question: Does the federal government require tour operators to maintain bonds to protect travelers? Answer: There's no such law, except for charter operators who must post bond and place your money in escrow until the trip is completed. Members of the U.S. Tour Operators Assn. voluntarily are bonded, as are about 40 tour firms belonging to the American Society of Travel Agents. Your agent can identify them.
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NEWS
March 8, 1991 | ANNE C. ROARK and ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The federal government and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons have begun the nation's first large-scale voluntary testing program to determine the percentage of surgeons who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, the cause of AIDS. More than 100 technicians and counselors hired by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control are expected to test about 3,000 orthopedists this week and next at the academy's annual meeting in Anaheim.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1991 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may not have been an environmental breakthrough when California Amplifier decided last year to stop emitting ozone-damaging chemicals from its manufacturing plant. After all, the Camarillo-based company had been a "pretty small source" of pollution, according to Karl Krause, manager of the engineering section of the Ventura County Air Pollution Control District. Nevertheless, David Nichols, California Amplifier's president, remembers thinking: "We're part of the problem. Do we have to be?"
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an unexpected consequence of a gun control law that took effect Jan. 1, the names of people admitted for mental health treatment at California hospitals are being recorded in state law enforcement computers. Although meant to keep firearms away from those who are considered dangerous to themselves or to society, the practice also applies to psychiatric patients who voluntarily check themselves in for treatment and have no history of violent behavior.
NEWS
January 30, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His grandfather was a forced laborer in Japan's coal mines, but college student Lee Soo Hyun came from South Korea to Tokyo voluntarily to study Japanese and build bridges between the two countries. Over the weekend, the 26-year-old Lee died a hero to both nations. He and another good Samaritan, a Japanese photographer, were hit by a train Friday night as they tried to rescue an apparently drunk man who had fallen onto the tracks.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Monte Morin
La Preferida Inc. is voluntarily recalling 56,808 29-ounce cans of La Preferida Whole Pinto Beans, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Thursday. "The manufacturer's preliminary inspection indicates 420 cans may not have been fully processed, which could result in product contamination by spoilage organisms or by pathogens, which could lead to illness if consumed," the FDA said. "To date, there have been no reported injuries or adverse events associated with the consumption of this product.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Nestle USA has voluntarily recalled some of its California Pizza Kitchen and DiGiorno frozen pizzas after the products were found to contain clear plastic pieces, the company said. The affected products include:  -- California Pizza Kitchen crispy thin-crust white pizza. -- California Pizza Kitchen limited edition grilled chicken with Cabernet sauce. -- DiGiorno crispy flatbread pizza Tuscan style chicken. -- DiGiorno pizzeria! bianca/white pizza. The company said it initiated the recall after some customers complained about finding bits of plastic in their pizza.
WORLD
October 22, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Prisoners detained without charges. Prisons operating outside the legal system. Limits on free speech and the Internet. Legitimate voters prevented from casting their ballots. Sanctioned kidnappings. Witch hunts and torture. It's all part of life, says the Russian government - in the United States. The Russian Foreign Ministry on Monday issued a 56-page report in Russian and English titled, " On the Human Rights Situation in the United States . " The report, distributed at hearings held by the International Affairs Committee of Russia's lower house of parliament, was the first such full examination of the U.S. human rights record issued here since the fall of communism in 1991.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Arthur Rudolph, 83, a former Nazi rocket scientist who helped develop the Apollo moon-landing program, will voluntarily return to West Germany to avoid a Canadian deportation hearing, an immigration official in Toronto said. Rudolph, who lived in the United States for 20 years, was accused of directing a missile factory where hundreds of laborers died. He voluntarily gave up his American citizenship and left the United States in 1984 after he was threatened with deportation.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | TRACY WOOD and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The route from USC's fraternity row to the 901 Club on Figueroa Street is marked by broad painted stripes running three blocks, a symbol of the bar's importance to the social life of the campus' affluent "Greeks." The "9-Oh," as the raucous college bar is affectionately known, is where inhibitions, like IDs, are checked at the door. For one fraternity--the prestigious and well-connected Alpha Tau Omega house--it is a path well traveled.
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