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Voluntary Hospitals Of America Inc

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August 2, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
Robert W. O'Leary will resign as chief executive of the St. Joseph Health System in Orange to become president and chief executive of Voluntary Hospitals of America Inc., a Dallas organization that provides services to a nationwide network of hospitals, officials said Tuesday. O'Leary, 45, has served as president and chief executive at St. Joseph Health System since 1983. The health-care organization, owned by the Sisters of St.
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BUSINESS
December 24, 1992
Bergen Brunswig, the nation's second-largest drug wholesaler, said Wednesday that it has completed negotiations with a nonprofit Texas hospital chain to keep it as a customer in the wake of a buyout of an Alabama competitor. In purchasing Durr-Fillauer Medical Inc. of Montgomery, Ala., in September for $470 million, Bergen Brunswig demanded that the smaller company's two top customers continue to do business with the combined concern.
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BUSINESS
December 24, 1992
Bergen Brunswig, the nation's second-largest drug wholesaler, said Wednesday that it has completed negotiations with a nonprofit Texas hospital chain to keep it as a customer in the wake of a buyout of an Alabama competitor. In purchasing Durr-Fillauer Medical Inc. of Montgomery, Ala., in September for $470 million, Bergen Brunswig demanded that the smaller company's two top customers continue to do business with the combined concern.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
Robert W. O'Leary will resign as chief executive of the St. Joseph Health System in Orange to become president and chief executive of Voluntary Hospitals of America Inc., a Dallas organization that provides services to a nationwide network of hospitals, officials said Tuesday. O'Leary, 45, has served as president and chief executive at St. Joseph Health System since 1983. The health-care organization, owned by the Sisters of St.
NEWS
April 25, 1989 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
The closure of Central Pathology Services Medical Group last week for allegedly misreading too many Pap smears not only sent doctors scurrying for other laboratories. The state order also left many women wondering how best to insure the accuracy of their test results. Of course, no medical test is 100% foolproof. But the Pap smear--a routine test for the detection of cancer of the cervix and other medical abnormalities--presents special problems. Depending on the skills of the technologist screening a Pap smear and the physician obtaining the cell sample, false-negative rates can range dramatically.
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