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BUSINESS
October 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Los Angeles Times Plans Limited Employee Buyout: In reaction to continuing difficulties in the Southern California economy, The Times announced a limited voluntary buyout aimed at reducing overall staff by about 100 positions, for a savings of at least $5 million annually. The reduction would include 30 full-time editorial positions, some of them from the newspaper's non-daily zone sections, which are being converted to a tabloid format.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1993
About 90 Metropolitan Transportation Authority employees have decided to take the agency's early retirement program this week, officials said Thursday. In an effort to cut costs and eliminate duplication, MTA officials estimated that the agency could trim 246 employees as a result of the merger last spring of the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission and the Southern California Rapid Transit District.
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NEWS
October 3, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like thousands of other Americans in this time of corporate belt-tightening, Jim Waller has just taken a buyout, a one-time cash payment as an incentive to retire early. "I'm 54. I had put in 34 years," Waller said. "It was a very hard decision. I agonized until the last minute. . . . But I feel like I'm getting a start on a new career." That would all seem ordinary except for one thing. Waller's employer is not just another company but, as it is known to insiders, "The Company": the CIA.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Los Angeles Times Plans Limited Employee Buyout: In reaction to continuing difficulties in the Southern California economy, The Times announced a limited voluntary buyout aimed at reducing overall staff by about 100 positions, for a savings of at least $5 million annually. The reduction would include 30 full-time editorial positions, some of them from the newspaper's non-daily zone sections, which are being converted to a tabloid format.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1993
About 90 Metropolitan Transportation Authority employees have decided to take the agency's early retirement program this week, officials said Thursday. In an effort to cut costs and eliminate duplication, MTA officials estimated that the agency could trim 246 employees as a result of the merger last spring of the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission and the Southern California Rapid Transit District.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Early-Retirement Offers Often Rejected: Most Americans offered such packages have turned them down, and some view them as a signal to leave only slightly subtler than "a dead fish on the desk," a University of Michigan study found. University economist Charles Brown said the research found that six out of 10 of those who got such an offer--about 6% of the U.S. work force--opted to keep their jobs.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Conrail to Eliminate 900 Nonunion Jobs: The Philadelphia-based freight railroad said the cuts are to be made through early-retirement and voluntary-separation programs over the next three years--but that involuntary actions may be taken if the reduction goal is not met. The company said recent snow, ice and flooding, combined with a sluggish economy, "put substantial pressure" on its goal to exceed first-quarter 1995 performance, to which it is committed. It also said Chairman James A.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chase to Sell $2.2 Billion in Assets: Chase Manhattan Corp. said it is selling the U.S. and Canadian assets of its Chase Manhattan Leasing Co. subsidiary for $2.2 billion. New York-based Chase, the nation's third-largest banking company, said the sale is part of its ongoing restructuring.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1993 | JACK SEARLES
Ventura County's largest private employer, Thousand Oaks-based GTE California, will continue the downsizing that has reduced about 1,000 jobs annually from its payroll over the past dozen years, but it's too early to tell how many positions will be lost this year. As it has in the past, GTE will try to avoid layoffs while paring its labor costs in 1993.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
Modest but steady newspaper advertising growth and unexpectedly strong results in professional and textbook publishing helped Times Mirror Co. boost its third-quarter income from continuing operations to $39.8 million from $15.2 million a year ago, although net income fell. Times Mirror, parent of the Los Angeles Times, announced Thursday that it logged net income of $52.3 million, or 41 cents a share, in the quarter ended Sept. 25, compared to $77.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like thousands of other Americans in this time of corporate belt-tightening, Jim Waller has just taken a buyout, a one-time cash payment as an incentive to retire early. "I'm 54. I had put in 34 years," Waller said. "It was a very hard decision. I agonized until the last minute. . . . But I feel like I'm getting a start on a new career." That would all seem ordinary except for one thing. Waller's employer is not just another company but, as it is known to insiders, "The Company": the CIA.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Early-Retirement Offers Often Rejected: Most Americans offered such packages have turned them down, and some view them as a signal to leave only slightly subtler than "a dead fish on the desk," a University of Michigan study found. University economist Charles Brown said the research found that six out of 10 of those who got such an offer--about 6% of the U.S. work force--opted to keep their jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1993 | DOUG McCLELLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
1,339 of whom work at corporate headquarters in Ventura County--financial incentives to retire early or quit. GTE officials said the number of employees who will actually be laid off in two months depends on how many others opt for the voluntary retirement and separation programs. A company spokesman said he did not know how many of the 300 employees who were given layoff notices work in Ventura County.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
Times Mirror Co., its newspaper group beginning to recover from the recession, Thursday reported a fourth-quarter profit of $161.8 million, contrasted with a year-earlier loss of $61.7 million. The Los Angeles-based publishing and cable television concern said the latest earnings, equal to $1.26 a share, were aided by a $131.7-million gain from the sale of its broadcast TV stations to Argyle Television Holdings Inc.
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