Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVoluntary Water
IN THE NEWS

Voluntary Water

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The City Council today approved a voluntary water conservation plan designed to cut consumption by at least 10%, rejecting Mayor Tom Bradley's call for mandatory rationing. By a 12-1 vote, council members approved the rationing ordinance proposed by Councilwoman Joan Milke Flores as an alternative to Bradley's plan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 24, 1997 | GEORGE SKELTON
Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren last week held a news conference to accuse Toys R Us and some toy makers of price fixing. He also gave a speech outlining his views on California's most critical long-term problem--water. Guess which event was all but ignored by the news media? It wasn't the toy show. "Before I went to that press conference," Lungren recalls, "I said to my people, 'Do I really have to do this? I feel a little awkward standing up there with a pink Barbie dollhouse.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1990 | PSYCHE PASCUAL
The city of Moorpark will mount a campaign to get residents and area farmers to use less water under a voluntary water conservation program the City Council has unanimously adopted. The council wants to cut water use by 10%. Farmers use 45% of the 40 million gallons of water consumed annually in Ventura County Waterworks District No. 1, an area that includes the city of Moorpark and surrounding farms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1997
The Times is correct to define 1997 as a "crucial time for water planning" for Southern California (editorial, March 20). In fact, the Metropolitan Water District has been preparing for the emerging era when California must live within its fair share of water from the Colorado River. Metropolitan set the pace in 1989 for equitable, voluntary water transfers from agricultural areas to urban areas with a program to save more than 100,000 acre-feet of water per year in the Imperial Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1991
Starting next month, San Diegans will be asked to cut their water use 30%. Figuring out how to implement the cuts falls on local water districts, most of whom have established a series of mandatory conservation steps. Except, that is, the city of San Diego, where the City Council continues to go along with Mayor Maureen O'Connor's wishful thinking that residents will cut back voluntarily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1991
LINDA BRANNON, Poway "It's not a question of voluntary vs. mandatory, or two little words as Mayor Maureen O'Connor says. When you are at the bottom of the pipeline, you better cooperate. We are beyond conservation. There is not time for that. It's wrong to mislead the public that they are going to be OK." Brannon household of four used 440 gallons a day during the most recent billing period. FRANK CHENELLE, National City "(The city of San Diego) just didn't want to be dictated to.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soundly rejecting Mayor Tom Bradley's mandatory water rationing plan, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday gave final approval to a voluntary plan that includes the city's first fines for flagrant water wasters. In a 12-1 vote, the council sent Bradley a conservation plan that calls for mandatory rationing only if the city's residents and businesses fail to cut overall water usage by 10% in any month. Bradley signed the new ordinance Tuesday afternoon and it will take effect in several days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1991
I am writing with regard to the story "Mayor's Water Use Soars With 2nd Meter" (March 17). At the moment my family of five members are practically bathing in a teacup and keeping our water consumption to under 250 gallons per day, compared to her honor's 3,248 per day. My reason for writing is to find out how we too can get a second water meter. The mayor has one for her "fish and trees," and, while we cannot boast of a fish pond, we do have birds, trees and flowers that live in our garden, along with a lovable dog that also enjoys the great outdoors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1990
After two months of voluntary water conservation, residents and businesses in Brea have cut consumption by 20%--double what the city had hoped to achieve. In June the City Council passed an ordinance instituting a water management program. The first phase of that program called for a voluntary 10% cut in water use. Although Patrick McCarron, director of maintenance services, expected Brea residents to respond, "I was surprised to see the actual numbers," he said.
NEWS
February 28, 1991
An ordinance imposing fines for misusing water and surcharges for excessive use was adopted Tuesday by the Lakewood City Council, making it the sixth city in the Southeast area to take such action against the drought. The measure, which calls for voluntary water reduction of 10%, goes into effect immediately.
OPINION
July 17, 1994
Congratulations for your comprehensive account of the historic first transfer of Central Valley Project water to urban Southern California ("Tapping Into the Heartland," July 3). Whenever treading uncharted courses, it's only natural that those who are involved express concerns. It should be noted, however, that the Metropolitan Water District is not excluding local irrigation districts in the San Joaquin Valley in arranging voluntary water transfers. In fact, discussions now are under way with the Central California Irrigation District about incorporating the Areias dairy farm transaction into a district-to-district water transfer, and with other water agencies in the San Joaquin Valley.
OPINION
December 26, 1993
Recent articles outline proposed new protections by the Environmental Protection Agency for fisheries in the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta (Dec. 15-16). These regulations will result in significant cutbacks in water allocations to Southern California. The Department of Water Resources recently released a water plan for California that predicts chronic shortages due to a population growth in Southern California that will create a demand for water far in excess of what the existing water infrastructure can provide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | CAITLIN ROTHER
Camrosa Water District customers may soon be able to use as much water as they did in 1989 without paying a penalty. Bills that customers receive next month might reflect the lack of water conservation penalties, which are expected to be lifted at the next board meeting, board President Jeffrey C. Brown said. The board had already lowered the district's water conservation requirements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992 | TERRY SPENCER
Because of recent heavy rains, the Public Utilities Department will ask the City Council today to lower the voluntary water conservation goal for residents and businesses from 15% to 10%. Under the proposal, residents and businesses would also no longer be fined for watering lawns between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m., washing down sidewalks or operating decorative fountains, although such actions will still be discouraged.
NEWS
January 23, 1992
The City Council voted unanimously this week to suspend the city's mandatory 10% water use reduction plan and return to a voluntary program. Under the new program, residents are asked to voluntarily cut their water use by 10%. Residents have cut their water use by an average of 22.8% over the last six months, Public Works Director Robert K. Sandwick said. Sandwick said that the city saved water even during the summer and that recent rainstorms have helped replenish the city's water supply.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1991 | JANET BERGAMO
A report released last week suggests that the success of Fillmore's voluntary water conservation program varies with the weather. Figures compiled by the city's Public Works Department show that during an unusually cool July this year, citizens used 16% less water than in July, 1990. But in October, with its unusually warm weather, consumption was only 1% lower than the same month last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | CAITLIN ROTHER
Camrosa Water District customers may soon be able to use as much water as they did in 1989 without paying a penalty. Bills that customers receive next month might reflect the lack of water conservation penalties, which are expected to be lifted at the next board meeting, board President Jeffrey C. Brown said. The board had already lowered the district's water conservation requirements.
OPINION
July 17, 1994
Congratulations for your comprehensive account of the historic first transfer of Central Valley Project water to urban Southern California ("Tapping Into the Heartland," July 3). Whenever treading uncharted courses, it's only natural that those who are involved express concerns. It should be noted, however, that the Metropolitan Water District is not excluding local irrigation districts in the San Joaquin Valley in arranging voluntary water transfers. In fact, discussions now are under way with the Central California Irrigation District about incorporating the Areias dairy farm transaction into a district-to-district water transfer, and with other water agencies in the San Joaquin Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1991 | TED JOHNSON
The Yorba Linda Water District board approved voluntary water conservation measures Thursday under which residents will be asked to reduce their water consumption by 18%. The board held off on making the measures mandatory, hoping that customers will reach conservation goals on their own, without the threat of surcharges on their water bills. Board members are also hoping that the recent rains will help the situation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1991 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL
The city of Oxnard decreased water use by 4.4% in February compared to last year, and 7.8% in January under a voluntary water conservation program the City Council adopted last year. The city consumed 1,397 acre-feet of water in February, compared to 1,461 acre-feet in February, 1990. One acre-foot of water typically takes care of the water needs of two typical families for one year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|