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Volunteers In Parole Organization

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armando Lopez came to this country from Mexico with his mother when he was a baby. When he was 7, she gave him up for adoption. At 16, he was skipping school and hanging out with boys who had joined a gang. That year, he was convicted of assault with a deadly weapon and second-degree murder. He spent the next seven years in jail with the California Youth Authority. Now 25, he is out on his own.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armando Lopez came to this country from Mexico with his mother when he was a baby. When he was 7, she gave him up for adoption. At 16, he was skipping school and hanging out with boys who had joined a gang. That year, he was convicted of assault with a deadly weapon and second-degree murder. He spent the next seven years in jail with the California Youth Authority. Now 25, he is out on his own.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1995 | ALAN EYERLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trust did not come easily to parolee Jennifer Gregor, a former crack addict who spent nearly a decade living on the streets of Santa Ana or confined to a cell. So when a lawyer she had never met suddenly wanted to be her friend, Gregor's streetwise suspicions took over. "Who would want to help me?" Gregor wondered. But Irvine attorney Lisa J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1995 | ALAN EYERLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trust did not come easily to parolee Jennifer Gregor, a former crack addict who spent nearly a decade living on the streets of Santa Ana or confined to a cell. So when a lawyer she had never met suddenly wanted to be her friend, Gregor's streetwise suspicions took over. "Who would want to help me?" Gregor wondered. But Irvine attorney Lisa J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1991 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forging a new life after seven years in prison for murder is hard enough, and Nino Paz decided the 1 1/4-inch tattoo on his right wrist created more difficulties. "There are a lot of wrongs you can't right. Some things can never be changed, and will always stick with you, but this is one of the things I could correct for myself," said the 23-year-old from the Los Angeles area who is on parole in San Diego.
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