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OPINION
November 4, 2002
I was so pleased to read that doctors can no longer be accountable for suggesting marijuana use to patients when needed ("Medical Pot Use Given a Boost," Oct. 30). I just finished a year of treatments for breast cancer. While in chemotherapy treatment, nothing could control my severe nausea and vomiting. I was prescribed the so-called best prescription drug: Zofran. I even had it in IV form. After being so weak from vomiting that I didn't have enough strength to crawl back into bed, I tried marijuana following my fourth chemo treatment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
March 1, 2014 | Jessica Q. Ogilvie
Chandra Wilson, who stars as Dr. Miranda Bailey on the ABC series "Grey's Anatomy," knows what it's like on the other side of the prescription pad. And she knows what it's like to advocate for an ill child. Her 20-year-old daughter has long struggled with mitochondrial disease, disorders caused by problems with the mitochondria, which generate energy for the cells. -- How did you first know that something was wrong? The first manifestations were cyclical vomiting syndrome.
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NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved a drug to treat the severe nausea and vomiting that some women experience during early pregnancy. The Canadian-made medication will be marketed as Diclegis. It is the only prescription medication approved for pregnant women experiencing "morning sickness" that does not go away with a bland diet of small meals that are low in fat. Diclegis was once known and marketed in the United States as Bendectin and taken by as many as one in 10 pregnant women.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Kelly Clarkson is happy to be pregnant, but she's really not enjoying the physical  process very much at all. As far as she's concerned, morning sickness goes way beyond morning, and the whole "glow" thing is a big fat lie. Clarkson told Ellen DeGeneres on Friday, while promoting her new Christmas album, that women who are bubbly about how great pregnancy is and how little they feel sick are definitely off her friend list right now. "I want...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2002
As a psychologist who specializes in and teaches a university course on the psychology of modern music, I appreciate Steve Hochman's review of Neil Young's "Are You Passionate?" (April 7). The cathartic value of music can't be valued enough in this age of new rage. But there's a marked difference between vomiting up emotions like the band Disturbed does so disturbingly, or delivering those same bottled-up emotions with both grit and grace. When it comes to the latter, Neil Young is king.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A small college is shutting down for several days after 100 students and staff members were sickened by a virus that causes a type of stomach flu. Students and faculty have been afflicted with severe nausea and vomiting at Babson College in Wellesley, west of Boston. State Department of Public Health spokesman Tom Lyons says the norovirus is "miserable" but isn't life-threatening. He says most people get better after a few days. The college is expected to be closed until at least Wednesday while campus buildings are cleaned.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1998
Re "Movies Ad Nauseam" (by Amy Wallace, May 12): If any Hollywood big shots are reading this, here's a word to the wise: The last thing people want or need is more on-screen vomiting. Believe me, movie audiences are quite capable of leaping the gap from the character who looks sickened to his or her off-screen retching, and figuring out what exactly is happening, without your having to show us every last viscous drop. What's next, on-screen defecation? Of course, sometimes in-your-face heaving serves a legitimate artistic purpose, as did Linda Blair's memorable pea soup geyser in "The Exorcist."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2006
REGARDING writer Caitlin Flanagan ["The Mother Lode," by Gina Piccalo, April 12], the happy housewife: That snickering sound you hear is 100,000 working moms gleefully laughing at the thought of Flanagan embarking on her book tour. As soon as she gets on the plane, the family gerbil will die, the 8-year-old twins will come down with fever and vomiting, the plumbing will spring a leak and the husband will score a business trip, all of which will require that housewife Flanagan cancel the book tour and return home on the very next flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
A new vaccine to prevent the potentially deadly whooping cough is effective in 71% of cases and produced no side effects, according to a study of 3,450 Swedish children. published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, causes a severe cough that lasts for about six weeks and can result in vomiting, choking, an inability to breathe and injury to the brain due to lack of oxygen. The vaccine used in the Swedish study is awaiting approval for use by the Food and Drug Administration.
HEALTH
March 1, 2014 | Jessica Q. Ogilvie
Chandra Wilson, who stars as Dr. Miranda Bailey on the ABC series "Grey's Anatomy," knows what it's like on the other side of the prescription pad. And she knows what it's like to advocate for an ill child. Her 20-year-old daughter has long struggled with mitochondrial disease, disorders caused by problems with the mitochondria, which generate energy for the cells. -- How did you first know that something was wrong? The first manifestations were cyclical vomiting syndrome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores and Hailey Branson-Potts
The accused serial killer who died Thursday was found by deputies in his Orange County jail cell shaking and vomiting, a sheriff's spokesman said Friday. Itzcoatl “Izzy” Ocampo, 25 -- who was accused of killing six people, including four homeless men, a woman and her son -- was set to appear in court for a pre-trial hearing in January. Deputies discovered an ill Ocampo inside his single-man cell and transported him to Western Medical Center in Santa Ana on Wednesday about 6:35 p.m., said Lt. Jeff Hallock.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | By Emily Alpert, Los Angeles Times
Bryan Piperno was just 9 years old when he began keeping his secret. The Simi Valley youngster tossed out lunches or claimed he ate elsewhere. As he grew older, he started purging after eating. Even after his vomiting landed him in the emergency room during college, he lied to hide the truth. Piperno, now 25, slowly fended off his eating disorder with time and care, including a stay in a residential treatment facility. But surveys show a rising number of teenage boys in Los Angeles now struggle with similar problems.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved a drug to treat the severe nausea and vomiting that some women experience during early pregnancy. The Canadian-made medication will be marketed as Diclegis. It is the only prescription medication approved for pregnant women experiencing "morning sickness" that does not go away with a bland diet of small meals that are low in fat. Diclegis was once known and marketed in the United States as Bendectin and taken by as many as one in 10 pregnant women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2012 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
One night in 2009, during a drunken conversation, Jacqueline Viens said her father told her why her stepmother had recently vanished. Dawn Viens had been needling him and he just wanted to sleep, Jacqueline Viens recalled her father saying. He'd tried barricading their bedroom door with a dresser to keep his wife out. When that didn't work, David Viens tied her up and taped her mouth, according to his daughter. The next morning, Dawn Viens was dead. Jacqueline Viens said her father told her that his wife had choked on her own vomit.
HEALTH
March 22, 2010 | By Marc Siegel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Mercy" NBC 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 10 Episode: "I'm Fine" The premise: Nurse Chloe Payne ( Michelle Trachtenberg) is taking care of Molly, an 11-year-old who has been admitted to Mercy Hospital with right upper-quadrant abdominal pain and intractable vomiting. When Molly suddenly develops a heart arrhythmia (ventricular tachycardia), Dr. Joe Briggs ( James Van Der Beek), the hospital's ICU chief, shocks Molly back into a normal rhythm with a defibrillator.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2009 | Associated Press
. -- More than 50 followers of spiritual guru James Arthur Ray had endured five days of fasting, sleep-deprivation and mind-altering breathing exercises when he led them into a sweat lodge ceremony near Sedona. People were vomiting in the stifling heat, gasping for air and lying lifeless on the floor, according to participant Beverley Bunn. One man was burned when he crawled into hot rocks, seemingly unaware of what he was doing, she said. "These people, including myself, were really just searching for a better way to live and a better life," she said.
HEALTH
March 22, 2010 | By Marc Siegel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Mercy" NBC 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 10 Episode: "I'm Fine" The premise: Nurse Chloe Payne ( Michelle Trachtenberg) is taking care of Molly, an 11-year-old who has been admitted to Mercy Hospital with right upper-quadrant abdominal pain and intractable vomiting. When Molly suddenly develops a heart arrhythmia (ventricular tachycardia), Dr. Joe Briggs ( James Van Der Beek), the hospital's ICU chief, shocks Molly back into a normal rhythm with a defibrillator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2008 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Comic actor John Ritter died on his daughter's 5th birthday in September 2003. The next day, his widow, actress Amy Yasbeck, told the girl that her dad's death was unavoidable. Since then, Yasbeck has come to believe the story she told their daughter Stella was wrong. "The doctors told it to me like I was 5 and I told it to her like she was 5," Yasbeck said in an interview with The Times. "The truth is, it's a lot more complicated and it's a lot more sad."
SCIENCE
May 15, 2009 | Shari Roan
Chemotherapy could soon become less grueling. Simply adding about half a teaspoon of ginger to food in the days before, during and after chemotherapy can reduce the often-debilitating side effects of nausea and vomiting, a large, randomized clinical trial has found. And a newer type of anti-nausea drug, when added to standard medications, can help prevent such side effects as well.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2009 | Associated Press
Elizabeth Edwards writes in a memoir being published this month that news of her husband's affair made her vomit in a bathroom. "I cried and screamed, I went to the bathroom and threw up," Edwards, 59, writes in her book, "Resilience." Edwards says her husband, John, admitted the betrayal just days after declaring in 2006 that he would seek the Democratic presidential nomination. She says she wanted him to drop out to protect the family from media scrutiny, but stood by his side anyway.
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