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Von Dutch

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BUSINESS
April 20, 2004 | Arlene Martinez, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. District Court judge upheld an injunction Monday against the former owner of Von Dutch Originals, banning Michael Cassel from using the clothing company's logo until a trademark infringement case is heard later this year. Cassel sought to remove the injunction, which was issued Feb. 11 in Los Angeles by Judge Christina A. Snyder, and asked Snyder to instead bar Von Dutch Originals from selling the trademark.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
During the car-crazy 1950s in Southern California, Dean Jeffries was one of the first hot rodders to chop, channel and soup-up automobiles. His distinctive paint jobs and sculpted body work attracted many admirers to his auto shop, including the likes of James Dean, Steve McQueen and A.J. Foyt. A legendary car painter and customizer who made the "Monkeemobile" and the original Green Hornet's "Black Beauty," Jeffries died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Hollywood. He was 80 and had been in declining health.
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NEWS
September 26, 1992
Von Dutch, 63, who pioneered artistic pin-striping on sport cars and hot-rods in the 1940s and 1950s. The reclusive artist, whose real name was Kenneth Howard, embellished automobiles with what one critic described as "Brancusi spires, cool fine lines etched like spider tracings." He befriended actor and auto enthusiast Steve McQueen and built the Winton Flyer, the yellow automobile featured in McQueen's film "The Reivers."
BUSINESS
March 25, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Former Von Dutch chief executive and clothier Tonny Sorensen — who gained recognition for popularizing a trucker cap bearing the company name and using celebrities to promote the brand — has left his own signature on his personal residence in Beverly Hills and put it on the market at $6.9 million. The gated Midcentury Modern was built in 1961 but completely redone by the Danish entrepreneur. He combined his love of minimalism and high-quality materials in the single-story, 6,000-square-foot home.
OPINION
September 9, 2002
As "Car Painter Earned His Stripes" (Sept. 2), your feature on the legendary Southern California pinstriper, suggests, "everyone who knew him or even spent five minutes with him has some crazy tale." Absolutely true, and here's my "crazy tale." In the 1960s, Von Dutch worked out of his garage in Reseda. One rainy evening he lifted a piece of footprint-and-paint-laden cardboard from the floor of his workshop and announced to no one in particular that "some idiot's going to pay me $100 for this."
NEWS
August 6, 2001
I was aghast to read about the Kustom Kulture movement ("The Counterculture Rat Pack," July 24) without a single reference to its progenitor, the late, great Von Dutch. He was the model for Ed "Big Daddy" Roth, having invented modern pinstriping, as well as monster "weirdo" art. He also, to answer the writer's open question, was the man who put the "K" in Kustom. To call the Kustom Kulture exhibition at the Laguna Art Museum the originator of the phrase is wrong. That entire exhibition was initially proposed to ape the Western Exterminator Exhibit at the Zero One Gallery a full five years prior to the 1992 Laguna show.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2004 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
When Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie tried working as Arkansas milkmaids in an episode of their reality show "The Simple Life," things ended badly, with the pair soaked in spilt milk. But their orange camouflage Von Dutch truckers' caps made an impression. Within hours, the hats were selling on EBay for three times their retail value. The Von Dutch brand, named for a seminal L.A. car customizer, has hit critical mass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2002 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today, the stripes that emphasize an automobile's shape are made of stick-on tape. But in the 1950s and '60s, an ill-tempered Southern Californian with an outlaw imagination pinstriped original designs by hand and turned pinstriping into an art form. This week, the first solo art show devoted to that car-culture pioneer--the late Von Dutch--opens on the Cal State Northridge campus. The irascible Dutch would have hated the show, or any exhibition honoring him, his admirers say.
AUTOS
August 2, 2006 | SUSAN CARPENTER
I was ready to rumble. Bring the bike on Wednesday, I told the guy. Noon. I'll be waiting in the empty parking lot at 45th and Figueroa. The driver from Von Dutch Kustom Cycles was late, but when he wheeled the Dutch Angel into the lot, all was forgiven. The behemoth 113-cubic-inch V-twin was tricked out with slick candy-stick pin-striping, a high-end racing motor and enough chrome for a lady to check out her helmet hair. If I were a guy, I would've whistled.
MAGAZINE
September 7, 2003 | VICTORIA NAMKUNG
Von Dutch is dead; long live Von Dutch. In the years after World War II, a visionary auto customizer named Kenneth "Von Dutch" Howard unleashed pinstriping, airbrushed hot rod flames and winged eyeballs on L.A. out of various Southland auto shops, and the collective unconscious hasn't been the same since. Von Dutch's art was lowbrow, rude and deliriously gorgeous, and a half-century later the hot rod surrealist is also a fashion icon.
AUTOS
August 2, 2006 | SUSAN CARPENTER
I was ready to rumble. Bring the bike on Wednesday, I told the guy. Noon. I'll be waiting in the empty parking lot at 45th and Figueroa. The driver from Von Dutch Kustom Cycles was late, but when he wheeled the Dutch Angel into the lot, all was forgiven. The behemoth 113-cubic-inch V-twin was tricked out with slick candy-stick pin-striping, a high-end racing motor and enough chrome for a lady to check out her helmet hair. If I were a guy, I would've whistled.
AUTOS
June 21, 2006 | Tom Nolan, Special to The Times
You can trace the term "hot rod" -- short for "hot roadster" -- back to 1939, when it was used to describe a sort of speedy vehicle certain Southern Californians were constructing out of factory-issue Detroit automobiles. These outlaw enthusiasts would take a '32 Ford V-8 roadster, say, and remove its fenders (and anything else that might be giving it extra weight), trick it up and produce a fairly decent-looking and extremely fast car.
MAGAZINE
May 7, 2006
The article "Jesse James Wants to Take You From Dork to Cool in 20 Minutes" (by Elizabeth Khuri, Men's Fashion Issue, April 9) quotes James referring to Von Dutch and other clothing companies: "They're all copying everything right from us and making bank off it. And they don't make motorcycles, they don't build cars, they don't know how to weld and fabricate and have this whole lifestyle and shop." Each of these statements is false. Von Dutch has existed since 1996, and from what I understand, James has only been creating his budget-priced apparel for about three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2006 | Justin Fenton, Baltimore Sun
SITTING in a cluttered auto shop in a sleepy southern Pennsylvania farm town, 45-year-old artist Robert Schroeder confessed that he's worried about groupies finding him. They want to give the mild-mannered automotive detailing artist their demo CDs. They want autographs. They want concert tickets. Don't ask him, he says -- he's just the pinstriper for the famed New Jersey band Bon Jovi. "The chicks flip out," Schroeder said.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2004 | Arlene Martinez, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. District Court judge upheld an injunction Monday against the former owner of Von Dutch Originals, banning Michael Cassel from using the clothing company's logo until a trademark infringement case is heard later this year. Cassel sought to remove the injunction, which was issued Feb. 11 in Los Angeles by Judge Christina A. Snyder, and asked Snyder to instead bar Von Dutch Originals from selling the trademark.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2004 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
When Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie tried working as Arkansas milkmaids in an episode of their reality show "The Simple Life," things ended badly, with the pair soaked in spilt milk. But their orange camouflage Von Dutch truckers' caps made an impression. Within hours, the hats were selling on EBay for three times their retail value. The Von Dutch brand, named for a seminal L.A. car customizer, has hit critical mass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
During the car-crazy 1950s in Southern California, Dean Jeffries was one of the first hot rodders to chop, channel and soup-up automobiles. His distinctive paint jobs and sculpted body work attracted many admirers to his auto shop, including the likes of James Dean, Steve McQueen and A.J. Foyt. A legendary car painter and customizer who made the "Monkeemobile" and the original Green Hornet's "Black Beauty," Jeffries died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Hollywood. He was 80 and had been in declining health.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For its 75th anniversary next year, Laguna Art Museum is developing an exhibit that will explore Southern California's custom-car culture of the 1950s and '60s, an era known for racy, pin-striped hot rods, the bubble-topped "Beatnik Bandit," and the rotund rodent "Ratfink." Tentatively titled "Custom Culture," the planned exhibit will feature three leading figures of the genre, all of whom worked in Los Angeles or Orange Counties, museum director Charles Desmarais said.
MAGAZINE
September 7, 2003 | VICTORIA NAMKUNG
Von Dutch is dead; long live Von Dutch. In the years after World War II, a visionary auto customizer named Kenneth "Von Dutch" Howard unleashed pinstriping, airbrushed hot rod flames and winged eyeballs on L.A. out of various Southland auto shops, and the collective unconscious hasn't been the same since. Von Dutch's art was lowbrow, rude and deliriously gorgeous, and a half-century later the hot rod surrealist is also a fashion icon.
OPINION
September 9, 2002
As "Car Painter Earned His Stripes" (Sept. 2), your feature on the legendary Southern California pinstriper, suggests, "everyone who knew him or even spent five minutes with him has some crazy tale." Absolutely true, and here's my "crazy tale." In the 1960s, Von Dutch worked out of his garage in Reseda. One rainy evening he lifted a piece of footprint-and-paint-laden cardboard from the floor of his workshop and announced to no one in particular that "some idiot's going to pay me $100 for this."
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