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Von Stroheim

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Since it's often claimed that the greatest loss in the history of the cinema is the 32 reels that Metro cut from Erich Von Stroheim's "Greed" (1923), it is important to remember that the 10 that remain were enough to get it voted as one of the 12 best films of all time by an international jury at the Brussels Exposition of 1958. As tragic as the fate of "Greed" was, it remains, even in truncated form, timelessly dazzling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
He was the "Man You Love to Hate." Considered by some to be the director who most influenced European filmmakers, he was admired by the likes of France's Jean Renoir and the Soviet Union's Sergei Eisenstein. During the silent era, he was a contemporary of such directors as Cecil B. DeMille and D.W. Griffith.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2002 | DENNIS MCLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Josef Erich von Stroheim, an award-winning motion picture and television sound editor who was also the son of the legendary silent film director Erich von Stroheim, has died. He was 79. Von Stroheim died March 22 at Valley Presbyterian Hospital in Van Nuys of complications from lung cancer.
MAGAZINE
February 29, 2004 | Patrick J. Kiger
1920-1930s * Not content to start wars and pick U.S. presidents, publisher William Randolph Hearst's real ambition, according to "The Chief," David Nasaw's 2000 Hearst biography, was to make classy costume epics featuring his paramour, Marion Davies. Some of Davies' silent-era efforts actually did boffo box office, but Hearst's fondness for overly lavish sets ate up the profits. * Joseph P.
NEWS
March 16, 1995 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers film for the Times Orange County Edition.
"Greed" was probably Erich von Stroheim's greatest achievement. It was also his greatest disappointment. This seminal example of silent filmmaking, one of a short list of movies that defined the medium during the '20s, was a trial for Von Stroheim from the start. In adapting Frank Norris' popular novel, "McTeague," Von Stroheim spent hard months shooting in San Francisco, the desert and mountain locales.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
He was the "Man You Love to Hate." Considered by some to be the director who most influenced European filmmakers, he was admired by the likes of France's Jean Renoir and the Soviet Union's Sergei Eisenstein. During the silent era, he was a contemporary of such directors as Cecil B. DeMille and D.W. Griffith.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Four films directed by "the man you love to hate," two very, very long epics, Bogey's last bad-guy movie and a ghostly screwball comedy head the pack of oldies recently making their DVD bows. They make up a diverse group that nonetheless together offers an antidote to the patriotic fare filling TV screens at the moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999 | BILL DESOWITZ, Bill Desowitz is a frequent contributor to Calendar
How do you reconstruct "Greed," the most notoriously mutilated masterpiece in film history, without the rest of Erich von Stroheim's grim tapestry of love, fate, heredity and lust for gold in San Francisco of the 1920s? Simple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1994
One unmentioned factor in the European interest in Death Valley ("A Hot Spot for Vacationers," Aug. 29) was the 1970 film, "Zabriskie Point," by Michelangelo Antonioni. Gorgeously photographed, the film was about youth rebellion. Another Death Valley connection is the Frank Norris naturalistic novel, "McTeague," written in 1899. Erich von Stroheim's film adaptation, "Greed," was made in 1924. The finale of the novel takes place in Death Valley, so Von Stroheim took his actors Gibson Gowland and Jean Hersholt there for filming under the blazing sun. Hersholt recalled the experience as the most grueling of his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS
"Joseph, you better get out here fast!" exclaimed a distraught Gloria Swanson, on the telephone to Miami and her lover, Joseph Kennedy, father of a future President of the United States and at that moment the backer of what was to be one of the most ambitious silent films ever attempted. "Our director," she continued, "is a madman!"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Four films directed by "the man you love to hate," two very, very long epics, Bogey's last bad-guy movie and a ghostly screwball comedy head the pack of oldies recently making their DVD bows. They make up a diverse group that nonetheless together offers an antidote to the patriotic fare filling TV screens at the moment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2002 | DENNIS MCLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Josef Erich von Stroheim, an award-winning motion picture and television sound editor who was also the son of the legendary silent film director Erich von Stroheim, has died. He was 79. Von Stroheim died March 22 at Valley Presbyterian Hospital in Van Nuys of complications from lung cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind every silver-haired guy sitting at the table with a scrapbook on his lap and a plate of pretzels and dip at his elbows is one heck of a story. Hal shot movie footage of the A-bomb test on Bikini Atoll and can tell you what it's like to fly above a mushroom cloud. Joe snapped pictures of the Allies liberating German concentration camps. Donnie almost died, camera in hand. He got trapped on a hilltop in South Vietnam and watched the enemy cut down his platoon from 70 men to six.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind every silver-haired guy sitting at the table with a scrapbook on his lap and a plate of pretzels and dip at his elbow is one heck of a story. Hal shot movie footage of the A-bomb test on Bikini Atoll and can tell you what it's like to fly above a mushroom cloud. Joe snapped pictures of the Allies liberating German concentration camps. Donnie almost died camera in hand. He got trapped on a hilltop in South Vietnam and watched the enemy cut down his platoon from 70 men to six.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999 | BILL DESOWITZ, Bill Desowitz is a frequent contributor to Calendar
How do you reconstruct "Greed," the most notoriously mutilated masterpiece in film history, without the rest of Erich von Stroheim's grim tapestry of love, fate, heredity and lust for gold in San Francisco of the 1920s? Simple.
MAGAZINE
March 22, 1998 | Susan King
"Intolerance" (1916) budget: about $2.5 million domestic gross: not available D.W. Griffith's landmark 1915 "Birth of a Nation" had audiences lining up to pay an unheard-of $2. That wasn't the case with "Intolerance." Two years in the making, with 45 stars and 10,000 extras, the film, into which Griffith had sunk $386,000, was released just as America entered World War I, and its pacifist theme left audiences cold.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind every silver-haired guy sitting at the table with a scrapbook on his lap and a plate of pretzels and dip at his elbows is one heck of a story. Hal shot movie footage of the A-bomb test on Bikini Atoll and can tell you what it's like to fly above a mushroom cloud. Joe snapped pictures of the Allies liberating German concentration camps. Donnie almost died, camera in hand. He got trapped on a hilltop in South Vietnam and watched the enemy cut down his platoon from 70 men to six.
NEWS
March 16, 1995 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers film for the Times Orange County Edition.
"Greed" was probably Erich von Stroheim's greatest achievement. It was also his greatest disappointment. This seminal example of silent filmmaking, one of a short list of movies that defined the medium during the '20s, was a trial for Von Stroheim from the start. In adapting Frank Norris' popular novel, "McTeague," Von Stroheim spent hard months shooting in San Francisco, the desert and mountain locales.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1994
One unmentioned factor in the European interest in Death Valley ("A Hot Spot for Vacationers," Aug. 29) was the 1970 film, "Zabriskie Point," by Michelangelo Antonioni. Gorgeously photographed, the film was about youth rebellion. Another Death Valley connection is the Frank Norris naturalistic novel, "McTeague," written in 1899. Erich von Stroheim's film adaptation, "Greed," was made in 1924. The finale of the novel takes place in Death Valley, so Von Stroheim took his actors Gibson Gowland and Jean Hersholt there for filming under the blazing sun. Hersholt recalled the experience as the most grueling of his career.
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