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Vonessa Martin

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM
The story so far for the Furious Theatre Company brings to mind a soul music classic by Otis Redding: 2,000 miles they roamed, to make a loading dock their home. But unlike the lonely, bereft fellow bewailing a life gone wrong in Redding's "[Sittin' on] The Dock of the Bay," the six young, unheralded proprietors of the fledgling Furious troupe have been so awash in good luck leading up to this weekend's debut that they find it almost stunning.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM
The story so far for the Furious Theatre Company brings to mind a soul music classic by Otis Redding: 2,000 miles they roamed, to make a loading dock their home. But unlike the lonely, bereft fellow bewailing a life gone wrong in Redding's "[Sittin' on] The Dock of the Bay," the six young, unheralded proprietors of the fledgling Furious troupe have been so awash in good luck leading up to this weekend's debut that they find it almost stunning.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
One man's homeland security is the source of another's alienation in Yussef El Guindi's effective, troubling chamber piece, "Back of the Throat," now playing at Pasadena Playhouse's upstairs Balcony Theatre. Following unspecified "attacks" by Muslim extremists on U.S. soil, twentysomething writer Khaled (Ammar Mahmood) receives a friendly house call from a couple of government agents (Anthony Di Novi and Doug Newell).
NEWS
August 1, 2002 | David C. Nichols
Theater Noise--Alex Jones' slashing 1997 drama of the perils of economic depression frequently suggests a latter-day "Look Back in Anger." It begins with teenage factory worker Dan (Damaso Rodriquez) bringing pregnant bride Becky (Vonessa Martin) to their new home, a shoddy Black Country government housing flat (strikingly designed by Shawn Lee). The grimy comic atmosphere soon darkens, as blaring techno music from next door awakens the couple on their first night and thereafter.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2009
If you think that getting in touch with your inner primitive is the ideal antidote to the sterility of modern civilization, San Francisco-based playwright Peter Sinn Nachtrieb's "Hunter Gatherers" urges you to reconsider. In a razor-sharp staging from Furious Theatre Company, Nachtrieb's bitingly hilarious black comedy spares neither savages nor saints as a polite dinner party devolves into an orgy of pent-up rage, sex and bloodshed. An exotic gourmet meal is the annual tradition with which two 35-year-old couples celebrate their enduring friendship, but this year chef Richard (Doug Newell)
NEWS
September 26, 2002 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Furious Theatre Company, an up-and-coming group that has recently staged two well-regarded U.S. premieres, tests its creative mettle on a classic in "The Playboy of the Western World" at the Armory Northwest in Pasadena. It's hard to believe that John Millington Synge's fiercely poetic comedy occasioned riots when first produced by the Abbey Theatre in 1907.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2005 | David C. Nichols;Philip Brandes
A hearty crew of players and designers take on 17th century English pulp in "The Fair Maid of the West, Parts I & II." This Furious Theatre Company assault on Thomas Heywood's antique saga of a barmaid-turned-swashbuckler works best as tongue-in-cheek trinket. The prolific Heywood wrote Part 1 around 1600, Part 2 in 1630. The gap between Elizabethan and Jacobean tastes compels adaptors James C. Leary and Damaso Rodriguez (who also directs).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2005 | Steven Oxman;Rob Kendt;David C. Nichols
"You always looked so old to me, Grandma," says adult malcontent George Barberie to the matriarch who dominated his traumatic Brooklyn childhood. "Now, we're the same age." The comment, delivered by actor Greg Mullavey with irony and anguish, signals the gist of "4318 Clarendon Road" at the West Valley Playhouse. George Tricker's memory play about a spiky Italian American clan and the adult survivor who recalls them hides accessible points within workaday observations.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2002 | David C. Nichols, Diane Haithman, Philip Brandes, Daryl H. Miller
Echoes of John Osborne permeate "Noise," receiving its U.S. premiere by the Furious Theatre in Pasadena. Alex Jones' slashing 1997 drama of the perils of economic depression frequently suggests a latter-day "Look Back in Anger." It begins with teenage factory worker Dan (Damaso Rodriquez) bringing pregnant bride Becky (Vonessa Martin) to their new home, a shoddy Black Country government housing flat (strikingly designed by Shawn Lee).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2005 | David C. Nichols;Philip Brandes;Rob Kendt
"You stepped over the line." Those words, which begin "The Shape of Things," supply the first clue to Neil LaBute's dark comic take on the subjectivity of surface truth. In its Los Angeles County premiere, this icily effective Furious Theatre mounting hides sober motives behind a hip, cynical facade. A London smash in its 2001 Almeida Theatre premiere, "Shape of Things" moved to Broadway, then became a LaBute-directed 2003 film.
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