Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVonetta Flowers
IN THE NEWS

Vonetta Flowers

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 26, 2006 | Jemele Hill, Orlando Sentinel
To us, it's gibberish. To her, it's heavenly. To us, it sounds like, "Waaaaa, Waaaaa!" To Vonetta Flowers, no sound was ever so promising. To us, it's sixth place. Americans don't come to the Winter Olympics for that. To Flowers, it's as good as a gold medal. Better, even. "There are so many people that would love to be in our shoes," Flowers said, "whether they finish first or last." Flowers, an American bobsledder, never did see (or hear) it like everyone else.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 26, 2006 | Jemele Hill, Orlando Sentinel
To us, it's gibberish. To her, it's heavenly. To us, it sounds like, "Waaaaa, Waaaaa!" To Vonetta Flowers, no sound was ever so promising. To us, it's sixth place. Americans don't come to the Winter Olympics for that. To Flowers, it's as good as a gold medal. Better, even. "There are so many people that would love to be in our shoes," Flowers said, "whether they finish first or last." Flowers, an American bobsledder, never did see (or hear) it like everyone else.
Advertisement
SPORTS
February 21, 2002 | Bill Plaschke
The color combination is deep, striking, tough enough for the Pittsburgh Steelers, pretty enough for a sunflower. But, for 78 years, absent from the Winter Olympics. Until this week, when a bundled-up track star from the Deep South painted the town with it. Black and gold. Forever in the person of Vonetta Flowers, the first African American gold medalist in Winter Olympic history. Black and gold. How beautiful it looked. How sadly strange it looked. For those who dominate these winter sports, it seems that gold medals sometimes come from birth or geography.
SPORTS
February 21, 2002 | Bill Plaschke
The color combination is deep, striking, tough enough for the Pittsburgh Steelers, pretty enough for a sunflower. But, for 78 years, absent from the Winter Olympics. Until this week, when a bundled-up track star from the Deep South painted the town with it. Black and gold. Forever in the person of Vonetta Flowers, the first African American gold medalist in Winter Olympic history. Black and gold. How beautiful it looked. How sadly strange it looked. For those who dominate these winter sports, it seems that gold medals sometimes come from birth or geography.
SPORTS
February 20, 2002 | BARRY TEMKIN, TRIBUNE OLYMPIC BUREAU
There were Jean Racine and Gea Johnson, a soap opera in a sled. And there were Sandra Prokoff and Susi-Lisa Erdmann, the seemingly unbeatable German pilots. Whoever dreamed that Jill Bakken, an afterthought in the tumultuous buildup to the inaugural women's Olympic bobsled competition, and Vonetta Flowers, a track star who had planned to retire from sports after failing to make the U.S. 2000 Summer Games team, would steal the spotlight Tuesday, not to mention the first gold medal in the event?
SPORTS
February 20, 2002
Two-women bobsled G Jill Bakken-Vonetta Flowers, United States S Sandra Prokoff-Ulrike Holzner, Germany B Susi Erdmann-Nicole Herschmann, Germany Men's 1.5k cross-country skiing G Tor Arne Hetland, Norway S Peter Schlickenrieder, Germany B Cristian Zorzi , Italy Women's 1.
SPORTS
February 21, 2006
Shauna Rohbock and Valerie Fleming of the U.S. are in third place after two runs and in fair shape to win a medal when the four-run, two-day women's bobsled competition concludes tonight. Their time of 1:55:02 is .09 of a second behind leaders Sandra Kiriasis and Anja Schneiderheinze (1:54.93) of Germany. The U.S. team of Vonetta Flowers, the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympic champion, and driver Jean Prahm, is ninth and probably won't earn a medal.
SPORTS
February 24, 2002
Feb. 9 Freestyle skiing: Women's moguls: Shannon Bahrke, silver; speedskating: Men's 5,000: Derek Parra, silver. Feb. 10 Snowboard: Women's halfpipe: Kelly Clark, gold. Feb. 11 Snowboard: Men's halfpipe: Ross Powers, gold; Danny Kass, silver; Jarret Thomas, bronze. Feb. 12 Freestyle skiing: Men's moguls: Travis Mayer, silver; speedskating: Men's 500: Casey FitzRandolph, gold; Kip Carpenter, bronze. Feb. 13 Alpine skiing: Men's combined: Bode Miller, silver. Feb.
OPINION
February 28, 2002
Before we wrap up the Olympic Games and ship them off into history, we need to include a balance sheet of sorts. I offer this: Cons: Salt Lake City selection scandal; fuss over endorsements; drug accusations; Russia's denouncement of a second gold medal in pair skating, then demand for a second gold in women's figure skating; Russia's charge of bias in freestyle aerial skiing, ice dancing, cross-country and skiing; South Korea's charge in speed skating.
SPORTS
August 26, 2007 | From the Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Sheila Johnson grew up dreaming of playing the violin, not tennis. Even so, Althea Gibson inspired her. Her school's orchestra director would take the violinists to the courts in the belief swinging a racket would help them in drawing their bows. During those outings, Johnson learned about Gibson, who broke tennis' color barrier in 1950.
SPORTS
February 20, 2002 | BARRY TEMKIN, TRIBUNE OLYMPIC BUREAU
There were Jean Racine and Gea Johnson, a soap opera in a sled. And there were Sandra Prokoff and Susi-Lisa Erdmann, the seemingly unbeatable German pilots. Whoever dreamed that Jill Bakken, an afterthought in the tumultuous buildup to the inaugural women's Olympic bobsled competition, and Vonetta Flowers, a track star who had planned to retire from sports after failing to make the U.S. 2000 Summer Games team, would steal the spotlight Tuesday, not to mention the first gold medal in the event?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|