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OPINION
June 28, 2012
Re "Romney's arithmetic," Opinion, June 24 When Ronald Reagan ran for office on a platform of avoiding deficits despite lower taxes and greater Pentagon spending, George H.W. Bush, his opponent in the 1980 GOP primary election, called that approach "voodoo economics," and rightly so considering that Reagan tripled the national debt by the time he left office. It looks as though Mitt Romney has adopted Reagan's platform. He proposes to increase defense spending by as much as 50% while cutting nonmilitary programs.
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OPINION
March 24, 2013 | By Brad Schiller
Two years before his death, Hugo Chavez tried to repeal the law of supply and demand, which says that free markets set the price: the higher the demand, the higher the price. Every producer who was willing to sell at that equilibrium price would be able to do so and every consumer willing and able to pay that price could acquire the product. Chavez despised the law because he believed it robbed the poor and unjustly profited producers. In its place, he persuaded the Venezuelan legislature to enact the 2011 Law on Fair Costs and Prices, a price-setting mechanism to ensure greater social justice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1985 | RICHARD CROMELIN
"SEVEN DAYS IN SAMMYSTOWN." Wall of Voodoo. I.R.S. Stan Ridgway is gone, taking with him the smirk and the sneer that defined the Wall's smart-ass, nightmare-in-the-fun-house stance. New singer Andy Prieboy is called on to imitate his predecessor's arch manner only a couple of times, but when he plays it straight he isn't distinctive enough to provide a strong focus for the band.
TRAVEL
February 3, 2013
THE BEST WAY TO PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI From LAX, Spirit, American, Delta, United and Copa offer connecting service (change of plane) to Port-au-Prince. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $708, including all taxes and fees. Have connections lined up in advance, preferably with someone who will meet you at the airport. Public transportation is confusing, subject to change and often conducted in overcrowded pickup trucks and on undersize motorcycles. There are buses and taxis from the airport, and the prices are alluringly low (about $1 per ride in one of the colorful little trucks called Tap-Taps)
BUSINESS
February 28, 1988
I am disappointed in James Flanigan's Jan. 24 column, "Baby Boomers Will Cushion Housing Slide." It reads like an advertisement for the real estate industry. When he quoted John Silvia of Kemper Financial Services saying that consumer debt should be measured against consumers' growing assets rather than against their current income, he was advocating voodoo economics. The value of assets, particularly of highly leveraged houses, is elusive. It fluctuates wildly with the economy (just look at Houston)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Farewell, Fred Voodoo A Letter from Haiti Amy Wilentz Simon & Schuster: 352 pp., $27 When an earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, killing thousands, Amy Wilentz tried to stay away. This wasn't easy for her to do. The Haitian people, their language and the unique beauty and madness of their country have been her obsession for a quarter-century. Indeed Wilentz, a Los Angeles writer and award-winning journalist, knows Haiti as well as any American writer has known a country that's not her own. Wilentz, author of the acclaimed book "The Rainy Season," didn't go to Haiti because she couldn't stand the idea of seeing that country of proud dreamers treated as just another group of pathetic disaster victims.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1986 | JANICE ARKATOV
It's the last night of Carnival, New Orleans, 1900. Marie Laveau (a local voodoo priestess) "has a life-or-death problem she's facing," said playwright Frank Gagliano, "and the people--a music critic and a soprano--are coming to her with their problems, to have them solved magically. Even if they were skeptical before, it's gotten so bad that she's their last resort. But on this night, everything is different. Because Marie does not need them as clients, but victims. . . ."
NEWS
November 2, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Haiti mourned its dead Tuesday in the heart of Port-au-Prince's main cemetery, voodoo worshipers offered rum, food and flowers at the skull-topped cross of Baron Samedi, leader of the spirits that rule Haiti's Day of the Dead. Christians held candles in one hand and trowels in the other, offering blessings and promising repairs for hundreds of desecrated tombs, the work of impoverished grave robbers, that stand as silent and grim testimony to Haiti's prolonged despair.
WORLD
February 9, 2010 | By Scott Kraft
When President Franklin Delano Roosevelt arrived here in 1934 to mark the end of America's occupation of Haiti, he insisted on toasting the hand-over with local Barbancourt rum. Two decades later, the visiting Vice President Nixon personally mixed a Barbancourt rum collins for Haiti's president (who was, ahem, a whiskey drinker). And every voodoo priest and priestess in Haiti knows that soaking the ground with the golden rum -- not the three-star version, mind you, but the five-star, aged twice as long -- can raise the spirits of the dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
In January 2010, after years of coveting an airy corner retail space at the intersection of 9th and Spring Street in downtown L.A.'s Fashion District, Eduardo Castillo signed the lease for Pattern Bar. To celebrate, he promptly started an entirely different nightclub. For most of the last two years, L.A.'s experimental dance music fans have clawed each other to ribbons trying to figure out a way into Voodoo, Castillo's once-a-month private house party that's hosted some of the fastest-rising names in local and international electronica for about 100 hand-curated friends a night.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Author Amy Wiltenz joined us from New York, where she's on tour with her new book "Farewell, Fred Voodoo: A Letter from Haiti. " Published this month by Simon & Shuster, "Farewell, Fred Voodoo" is a compelling work of reportage and memoir that recounts the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake that killed thousands in Haiti. Reviewing it in The Times, I called it "excellent and illuminating" and "a love letter to -- and a lament for -- Haiti. " In our interview, Wilentz, a Los Angeles resident, discusses her initial reluctance to return to Haiti in the wake of the earthquake, despite having written a book and dozens of magazine articles about its struggles with poverty and dictatorship.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Farewell, Fred Voodoo A Letter from Haiti Amy Wilentz Simon & Schuster: 352 pp., $27 When an earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, killing thousands, Amy Wilentz tried to stay away. This wasn't easy for her to do. The Haitian people, their language and the unique beauty and madness of their country have been her obsession for a quarter-century. Indeed Wilentz, a Los Angeles writer and award-winning journalist, knows Haiti as well as any American writer has known a country that's not her own. Wilentz, author of the acclaimed book "The Rainy Season," didn't go to Haiti because she couldn't stand the idea of seeing that country of proud dreamers treated as just another group of pathetic disaster victims.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012
Make yours a happy holiday at a "Swingin' Christmas" with Big Bad Voodoo Daddy at Disney Hall. The popular swing revival band will turn Christmas classics such as "Jingle Bells" and "Blue Christmas" into big-band ragers that will have you tapping your toes in no time. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., L.A. 8 p.m. Fri. Prices vary. (323) 850-2000, http://www.laphil.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By Karen Wada
The last decade has been a grim one for Haiti, the Caribbean country having endured hurricanes, floods, political turmoil and a massive earthquake. But amid the devastation, something rich and vibrant has emerged. "The horror of these years has inspired extraordinarily original and powerful art," says Donald J. Cosentino, a UCLA professor emeritus and Haitian art specialist. A new exhibition at UCLA's Fowler Museum illustrates how the nation's artists have responded to adversity by embracing and expanding on cultural traditions, especially the religion of voodoo.
OPINION
June 28, 2012
Re "Romney's arithmetic," Opinion, June 24 When Ronald Reagan ran for office on a platform of avoiding deficits despite lower taxes and greater Pentagon spending, George H.W. Bush, his opponent in the 1980 GOP primary election, called that approach "voodoo economics," and rightly so considering that Reagan tripled the national debt by the time he left office. It looks as though Mitt Romney has adopted Reagan's platform. He proposes to increase defense spending by as much as 50% while cutting nonmilitary programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
In January 2010, after years of coveting an airy corner retail space at the intersection of 9th and Spring Street in downtown L.A.'s Fashion District, Eduardo Castillo signed the lease for Pattern Bar. To celebrate, he promptly started an entirely different nightclub. For most of the last two years, L.A.'s experimental dance music fans have clawed each other to ribbons trying to figure out a way into Voodoo, Castillo's once-a-month private house party that's hosted some of the fastest-rising names in local and international electronica for about 100 hand-curated friends a night.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1987 | CHRIS WILLMAN
* * * * "HAPPY PLANET." Wall of Voodoo. I.R.S. Cynics' choice Wall of Voodoo will never, ever be characterized as "happy" campers, but the music here has turned more pleasant by a long shot. And that may be a big minus for many. Abrasive elements have been phased out in favor of a smoother, blander wash of keyboards, and the distinctive guitar parts have unfortunately been placed way down in the mix.
WORLD
January 22, 2010 | By Joe Mozingo
The night was filled with voices, murmuring then gathering together then rising into hymns and chants that carried far in the balmy air. This was the time for God and for spirits. On a road next to the central cemetery, residents of a small slum were lying on mattresses and pieces of cardboard set out on the broken pavement. A woman started to hum a Christian song, and soon rallied a chorus, singing and dancing and clapping for rhythm. " K em kontan Jesus renmem, aleluya ," they sang -- joyously, not mournfully.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
There were more witnesses when Jeffrey and Kathryn Elliott renewed their vows in the lobby of a doughnut shop than at their first wedding in Hawaii. This time, instead of family and friends, the ceremony was observed by a ring of delighted tourists snapping pictures on their cellphones while a skinny "voodoo priest" in battered Chuck Taylors and a mask fashioned from a paper bag officiated over their declaration of love. The couple ? she's a technical writer for Microsoft; he's a management consultant ?
BUSINESS
December 20, 2010 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
Connie Pentek's company might be saved by a voodoo doll. Pentek, who lives in Santa Clarita, started out in 1992 creating and selling homemade items influenced by the look of the French countryside. She and her husband, Gustav, lovingly made items such as hand-gilded lampshades and candle sconces fashioned from roof tiles. But apart from these pieces, Pentek created a novelty item that she initially made as a gift for friends. It was a stuffed doll with a muslin exterior, adorned with hand-written symptoms of aging that could be pricked, voodoo style, with a pin. Sales of the French-inspired items plummeted in recent years, especially as the economy soured.
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