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Voter Registration Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, the Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project launched an ambitious campaign to add 30,000 Latino voters to the rolls in the San Fernando Valley. The disappointing news was that only about 10,000 Latinos had been registered by the time the project ran out of money and shut its Reseda office in 1998.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000
With only four days remaining to register to vote in the Nov. 7 election, Secretary of State Bill Jones on Friday toured local retail stores taking part in a special voter registration drive. "Today, we're hitting music and book stores . . . encouraging shoppers to register to vote when they pick up the latest CD or book," Jones said. More than 220 Wherehouse Music, Borders Books & Music and independent bookstores participated in Entertainment Day as part of the campaign.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1998 | BOB RECTOR, Bob Rector is op-ed editor for the Valley and Ventura County editions
Richard Quevedo is co-chairman of the Southwest Voter Project's program to register Latino voters in the San Fernando Valley. Using volunteers, the group is blanketing schools, churches and shopping areas to register as many eligible Latino voters as possible in time for the June and November elections, an effort that could significantly alter Valley voting and political demographics. Quevedo recently talked about his group's efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, the Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project launched an ambitious campaign to add 30,000 Latino voters to the rolls in the San Fernando Valley. The disappointing news was that only about 10,000 Latinos had been registered by the time the project ran out of money and shut its Reseda office in 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1998 | NONA YATES
Monday is the last day to register to vote in the June 2 primary. * Who may register: You must be a U.S. citizen, at least 18 years old on or before election day, and a California resident for 29 days before the election. If you move within 28 days of the election, you may vote by returning to your former precinct or by obtaining an absentee ballot for that precinct. If you are in prison or on parole for a felony conviction, you are ineligible to vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1992
On the last weekend to register to vote before the Nov. 3 election, San Fernando Valley Democrats walked two major streets Saturday urging people to stop at street-corner registration booths and sign up to cast ballots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1992 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Jesse Jackson, in Los Angeles as part of a nationwide effort to register new voters, told groups of welfare recipients and inner-city high school students Friday that by voting, they can control "the destiny of America." "We face tremendous odds in urban America," Jackson told the 800 students gathered in the auditorium of Fremont High School in South-Central Los Angeles. "Nobody will save us but us. And by voting, you can take back some of that power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1993
Monday is the deadline for registering to vote in the June 8 Los Angeles municipal election. If you have moved or changed your name or party affiliation, you must re-register to vote. To be eligible to vote, you must be at least 18 by Election Day, a U.S. citizen residing in the city of Los Angeles 29 days before the election and you cannot be a felon in prison or on parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1989 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
Gloria Molina is running against nobody. So the Los Angeles city councilwoman has put her money and effort into registering voters in a poor, predominantly Latino district that has the city's lowest political participation. Nobody is not a disparaging term directed at nonentity candidates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000
With only four days remaining to register to vote in the Nov. 7 election, Secretary of State Bill Jones on Friday toured local retail stores taking part in a special voter registration drive. "Today, we're hitting music and book stores . . . encouraging shoppers to register to vote when they pick up the latest CD or book," Jones said. More than 220 Wherehouse Music, Borders Books & Music and independent bookstores participated in Entertainment Day as part of the campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1998 | NONA YATES
Monday is the last day to register to vote in the June 2 primary. * Who may register: You must be a U.S. citizen, at least 18 years old on or before election day, and a California resident for 29 days before the election. If you move within 28 days of the election, you may vote by returning to your former precinct or by obtaining an absentee ballot for that precinct. If you are in prison or on parole for a felony conviction, you are ineligible to vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1998 | BOB RECTOR, Bob Rector is op-ed editor for the Valley and Ventura County editions
Richard Quevedo is co-chairman of the Southwest Voter Project's program to register Latino voters in the San Fernando Valley. Using volunteers, the group is blanketing schools, churches and shopping areas to register as many eligible Latino voters as possible in time for the June and November elections, an effort that could significantly alter Valley voting and political demographics. Quevedo recently talked about his group's efforts.
NEWS
December 1, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Texas-based nonprofit group has launched an unprecedented drive to register 35,000 Latino voters in the San Fernando Valley, an effort that could reshape the area's political landscape. To achieve its goal, the Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project is relying on some unusual tactics, such as appealing to potential voters in high schools, on community college campuses and in churches with large Spanish-speaking congregations.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
The African American Vote Project kicks off today at its Crenshaw district office, in the hopes of spurring apathetic blacks to participate in the election process. The project, a statewide effort under the auspices of the state Democratic Party, seeks to register African American voters and ensure that they vote. Organizers say they are looking to Los Angeles' black community to take the lead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1993 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a quick, one-phrase cram course in Korean, 14 enthusiastic Los Angeles high school students of African, Latino and Chinese ancestries teamed up Saturday with the Korean American Coalition to register new voters in the heart of Koreatown. "Yoo kwon ja im-ni-ka?" ("Are you a registered voter?") Jessie Calvillo, Monica Perez, and Sylvia Ezirim, all 10th-graders, asked shoppers at the posh Koreatown Plaza, the Korean equivalent of the Beverly Center, at 928 Western Ave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1993
Monday is the deadline for registering to vote in the June 8 Los Angeles municipal election. If you have moved or changed your name or party affiliation, you must re-register to vote. To be eligible to vote, you must be at least 18 by Election Day, a U.S. citizen residing in the city of Los Angeles 29 days before the election and you cannot be a felon in prison or on parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to bolster the feeble electoral clout of recent immigrants, Latino advocates Monday kicked off a drive to encourage hundreds of thousands of foreign-born Southern Californians to become U.S. citizens and vote. "Citizenship is our political voice," said Los Angeles City Councilman Mike Hernandez, who was among those at City Hall unveiling the ambitious effort sponsored by the National Assn. of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1987 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
At the upper end of Haines Canyon Avenue, where goats browse on a stubbly hillside 2,000 feet above sea level and snowflakes swirl in a cold spring wind, people talk about the rest of Los Angeles as if it were the Casbah--a place to lose their wallets or their virtue. Part of Tujunga in the San Fernando Valley, Haines Canyon belongs to the city's northern tier, one of the fastest growing, most well-off areas of town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to bolster the feeble electoral clout of recent immigrants, Latino advocates Monday kicked off a drive to encourage hundreds of thousands of foreign-born Southern Californians to become U.S. citizens and vote. "Citizenship is our political voice," said Los Angeles City Councilman Mike Hernandez, who was among those at City Hall unveiling the ambitious effort sponsored by the National Assn. of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1992
On the last weekend to register to vote before the Nov. 3 election, San Fernando Valley Democrats walked two major streets Saturday urging people to stop at street-corner registration booths and sign up to cast ballots.
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