Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVoter Registration United States
IN THE NEWS

Voter Registration United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 3, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 5 million people have been added to voter registration rolls in the eight months since the federal "motor voter" law took effect, the New York Times reported. The National Voter Registration Act allows citizens getting a driver's license to register to vote at the same time. If the registration surge continues, political experts estimate that by the turn of the century, four out of five adults will be registered to vote, compared with three of five now, the paper reported.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 21, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 3.4 million Americans signed up to vote thanks to a law requiring that they be allowed to register by mail or while renewing a driver's license. But most "motor voters" didn't motor to the polls. Turnout for last year's presidential election dropped even as registration hit a record high, a Federal Election Commission study found. In 1996, 73% of those eligible were registered and only 49% voted, the FEC said. Four years earlier, the comparable figures were 71% registered and 55% voting.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesse Jackson, perpetually late, is once again behind schedule. His black limousine has already pulled away from the curb outside Jim Hill High School here when a passenger points out the schoolgirl. She is inconsolable, sobbing loudly over her missed opportunity to meet the erstwhile Democratic presidential candidate. "Stop," Jackson commands the driver. "Where is she?"
NEWS
November 15, 1996 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In many places in the United States, more identification is required to check out a dogeared library copy of "The Grinch Who Stole Christmas" than to cast a ballot. To get a library card, one must show proof of residence, such as an electric bill. To become a registered voter, one is simply required to fill out an application and sign--under penalty of perjury--that one is a U.S. citizen.
NEWS
October 7, 1987
For the first time, the share of young blacks who voted surged significantly ahead of the percentage of young whites who went to the polls, the Census Bureau reported in a study of turnout for the non-presidential 1986 election. Turnout of people aged 18 to 24 for both groups edged down slightly, but still rounded off to 25% for young blacks, while falling to 22% for their white counterparts, the report found.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House, setting up another election-year confrontation with President Bush, approved legislation Tuesday that would simplify voter registration laws by permitting people to register by mail or as they apply for a driver's license. Democrats overrode angry Republican protests to pass the so-called "motor voter" bill, 268 to 153, in nearly a straight party-line vote. Barring a last-minute change of heart at the White House, the measure is almost certain to be vetoed.
NEWS
June 21, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 3.4 million Americans signed up to vote thanks to a law requiring that they be allowed to register by mail or while renewing a driver's license. But most "motor voters" didn't motor to the polls. Turnout for last year's presidential election dropped even as registration hit a record high, a Federal Election Commission study found. In 1996, 73% of those eligible were registered and only 49% voted, the FEC said. Four years earlier, the comparable figures were 71% registered and 55% voting.
NEWS
November 15, 1996 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In many places in the United States, more identification is required to check out a dogeared library copy of "The Grinch Who Stole Christmas" than to cast a ballot. To get a library card, one must show proof of residence, such as an electric bill. To become a registered voter, one is simply required to fill out an application and sign--under penalty of perjury--that one is a U.S. citizen.
NEWS
August 26, 1994 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson has ordered his Administration to defy the federal government and refuse to implement the so-called motor-voter registration law unless Congress forwards the money to pay for the program. The new law, intended to boost citizen participation in elections, requires the state by Jan. 1 to begin providing voter registration material to driver's license applicants and at a host of state and local government offices.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People who apply for or renew their driver's licenses could automatically be registered to vote under terms of an ambitious registration measure that was approved Wednesday by the Senate. But it faces a presidential veto. The "motor-voter" bill, which would register drivers unless they decline, would nationalize voter registration by mail and reach out to many other citizens by offering registration at welfare, unemployment and other government offices, beginning in 1994.
NEWS
September 3, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 5 million people have been added to voter registration rolls in the eight months since the federal "motor voter" law took effect, the New York Times reported. The National Voter Registration Act allows citizens getting a driver's license to register to vote at the same time. If the registration surge continues, political experts estimate that by the turn of the century, four out of five adults will be registered to vote, compared with three of five now, the paper reported.
NEWS
August 26, 1994 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson has ordered his Administration to defy the federal government and refuse to implement the so-called motor-voter registration law unless Congress forwards the money to pay for the program. The new law, intended to boost citizen participation in elections, requires the state by Jan. 1 to begin providing voter registration material to driver's license applicants and at a host of state and local government offices.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, overcoming a lengthy Republican filibuster, passed and sent to President Clinton on Tuesday a landmark bill intended to make voter registration easier for millions of Americans.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, ending a marathon Republican filibuster, approved landmark legislation Wednesday to simplify and liberalize the nation's voter registration laws. The so-called "motor voter" bill finally passed, 67 to 32. Approval came after Senate Republicans--in a potent early signal to the Clinton Administration--succeeded in wresting several key concessions from Democrats in return for ending a filibuster that had locked the Senate in a legislative stalemate for nearly two weeks.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House, setting up another election-year confrontation with President Bush, approved legislation Tuesday that would simplify voter registration laws by permitting people to register by mail or as they apply for a driver's license. Democrats overrode angry Republican protests to pass the so-called "motor voter" bill, 268 to 153, in nearly a straight party-line vote. Barring a last-minute change of heart at the White House, the measure is almost certain to be vetoed.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People who apply for or renew their driver's licenses could automatically be registered to vote under terms of an ambitious registration measure that was approved Wednesday by the Senate. But it faces a presidential veto. The "motor-voter" bill, which would register drivers unless they decline, would nationalize voter registration by mail and reach out to many other citizens by offering registration at welfare, unemployment and other government offices, beginning in 1994.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, ending a marathon Republican filibuster, approved landmark legislation Wednesday to simplify and liberalize the nation's voter registration laws. The so-called "motor voter" bill finally passed, 67 to 32. Approval came after Senate Republicans--in a potent early signal to the Clinton Administration--succeeded in wresting several key concessions from Democrats in return for ending a filibuster that had locked the Senate in a legislative stalemate for nearly two weeks.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, overcoming a lengthy Republican filibuster, passed and sent to President Clinton on Tuesday a landmark bill intended to make voter registration easier for millions of Americans.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesse Jackson, perpetually late, is once again behind schedule. His black limousine has already pulled away from the curb outside Jim Hill High School here when a passenger points out the schoolgirl. She is inconsolable, sobbing loudly over her missed opportunity to meet the erstwhile Democratic presidential candidate. "Stop," Jackson commands the driver. "Where is she?"
NEWS
October 7, 1987
For the first time, the share of young blacks who voted surged significantly ahead of the percentage of young whites who went to the polls, the Census Bureau reported in a study of turnout for the non-presidential 1986 election. Turnout of people aged 18 to 24 for both groups edged down slightly, but still rounded off to 25% for young blacks, while falling to 22% for their white counterparts, the report found.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|