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Voting Age

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NEWS
November 29, 2011 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Texas Gov. Rick Perry campaigned in New Hampshire on Tuesday to tout his endorsement from Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, Ariz., but it was the GOP presidential candidate's misstatement of the voting age that caught the attention of reporters during a speech at St. Anselm College. Perry, who during a recent Republican presidential debate struggled for nearly a minute to remember the third agency on a list of three federal departments that he said he wanted to eliminate, slipped up just as he was wrapping up his prepared remarks at his third of four events in the Granite State.
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NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Monday marks the 42nd anniversary of the 26th Amendment to the Constitution, which says: “The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of age.” As President Obama noted on its 40th anniversary, “once proposed in Congress in 1971, the 26th Amendment was ratified in the shortest time span of any constitutional amendment in...
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NEWS
December 16, 1988 | From Reuters
India's lower house of Parliament on Thursday unanimously agreed to lower the voting age from 21 to 18.
NEWS
November 29, 2011 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Texas Gov. Rick Perry campaigned in New Hampshire on Tuesday to tout his endorsement from Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, Ariz., but it was the GOP presidential candidate's misstatement of the voting age that caught the attention of reporters during a speech at St. Anselm College. Perry, who during a recent Republican presidential debate struggled for nearly a minute to remember the third agency on a list of three federal departments that he said he wanted to eliminate, slipped up just as he was wrapping up his prepared remarks at his third of four events in the Granite State.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | From Associated Press
This fall's elections will see 7.8 million more U.S. residents of voting age than in the last midterm contests in 1990. The Census Bureau estimates that 193,650,000 U.S. residents will be 18 or older this November, 4.1 million more than in 1992 and 7.8 million more than in 1990. Not everyone who is old enough to vote does so. Some are not eligible because they are not U.S. citizens or are convicted felons. In 1990, 33.1% of those who were eligible voted.
OPINION
September 26, 2011 | Jim Newton
There are two conversations going on inside the L.A. County Hall of Administration about the delicate matter of redrawing maps for the supervisorial districts. Both will come to a head Tuesday, but only one will be publicly acknowledged. The surface conversation concerns the rising demographic significance of Latinos and the vague but consequential question of what constitutes "polarized voting. " One faction, led by Supervisor Gloria Molina, favors creating a second district that would include a majority of voting-age Latino citizens.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Monday marks the 42nd anniversary of the 26th Amendment to the Constitution, which says: “The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of age.” As President Obama noted on its 40th anniversary, “once proposed in Congress in 1971, the 26th Amendment was ratified in the shortest time span of any constitutional amendment in...
OPINION
March 14, 2004
Re "Giving New Meaning to 'Youth Vote,' " March 9: In 1971, 18-year-olds won the right to vote. They felt that if they were able to die for their country, they should be able to choose who was sending them. In a sense, that is what we as teenagers are asking. We are asking to choose who will affect our lives financially. We may not be old enough to fight the war going on now, but the decisions being made by our government will not only affect our generation but our generation's children, and we should have some influence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1986
"Two-thirds of American high-school juniors surveyed recently did not know that the Civil War was fought sometime between 1850 and 1900. One-third could not point to Great Britain, West Germany or France on a map. And one-half had never heard the names Winston Churchill and Josef Stalin. . . ." "Remember, these are 17-year-olds--one year short of voting age." Thanks to these quotes from the article by Secretary Bennett, after all these years, we finally know why Ronald Reagan got elected.
NEWS
March 4, 1988
Brazil's Constituent Assembly has voted to lower the voting age to 16. The action of the assembly, which is drafting a new constitution, would add about 10 million voters to the nation's electoral roll if the new constitution is ratified. The plan was approved by the assembly, 355 to 98. At present, voting is compulsory for all Brazilians 18 and over. Under the new constitutional provision, voting for those between the ages of 16 and 18 would be a right but not a legal obligation.
OPINION
September 26, 2011 | Jim Newton
There are two conversations going on inside the L.A. County Hall of Administration about the delicate matter of redrawing maps for the supervisorial districts. Both will come to a head Tuesday, but only one will be publicly acknowledged. The surface conversation concerns the rising demographic significance of Latinos and the vague but consequential question of what constitutes "polarized voting. " One faction, led by Supervisor Gloria Molina, favors creating a second district that would include a majority of voting-age Latino citizens.
NEWS
April 26, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Despite strong recent turnouts at the polls, Latinos trail other groups when it comes to voting, according to an analysis of census data released Tuesday by the Pew Hispanic Center. More than 6.6 million Latinos went to the polls in the recent November midterm election, making the group a rich prize for Democrats and Republicans in the 2012 cycle, which includes a battle for the presidency and control of both houses of Congress. The growing Latino population, particularly in the Southwest and West, makes the group a pillar of support  for Democrats, who have been the beneficiaries of votes by Latinos, who generally favor the party’s position on immigration reform.
IMAGE
December 26, 2010 | Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
Just like guests who obliviously kick back on your couch long after the holiday party has ended, the year winds down with a handful of things that have overstayed their welcome in the pop culture arena. We'd like to offer a gentle tap on the shoulder and a cab ride into anonymity for the following: Toning Footwear If those shoes performed as advertised, we'd all have Brooke Burke's badonkadonk and Kim Kardashian's curves by now. Enough said. The Bieber 'Do Unless your birth certificate says " Justin Bieber" on it, let the mop-of-swept-hair thing go, ahhight?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2009 | Bob Pool
Sylvia Levin, who set a record for civic-mindedness by personally registering more than 47,000 Californians to vote, died Thursday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications from a stroke. She was 91. The Santa Monica resident was a familiar sight in Westside communities where, for 36 years, she spent six days a week signing up new voters. Sundays were spent at the farmers' market in Westwood Village.
OPINION
October 29, 2008
Turnout for Tuesday's election is expected to be vast, but one group will be grievously underrepresented in many states. As many as 5 million felons are barred from exercising the most important duty of citizenship even though they have served their sentences or been released on parole. A disproportionate number of them are African Americans. According to the Sentencing Project, 13% of African American males are unable to vote because of felon-disenfranchisement statutes.
NEWS
April 23, 2005 | Sue Pascoe
Working on a reference book about the amendments to the U.S. Constitution, I was amazed to find how many concern voting issues. The 13th, 14th and 15th amendments, passed after the Civil War, dealt with citizenship and the right of former slaves to vote. The 17th provided for direct election of senators. The 19th gave the vote to women. The 23rd allowed residents of the District of Columbia that right. The 24th outlawed the poll tax, and the 26th lowered the voting age to 18.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2004 | Dana Parsons, Dana Parsons' column appears Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays. He can be reached at (714) 966-7821 or at dana.parsons@latimes.com. An archive of his recent columns is at www.latimes.com/parsons.
I'd committed myself Tuesday morning to finding someone of voting age who didn't intensely dislike -- oh, let's use the word, "hate" -- either George Bush or John Kerry. With tensions mounting a week before election day and Americans being told daily how divided they are and how duplicitous the presidential candidates and their backers are, was it possible to find a voter who didn't actually hate either man? Democrats didn't hate Dwight Eisenhower. Republicans didn't hate Jimmy Carter.
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