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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1996 | SCOTT HARRIS
It's one of the curious traditions of American democracy: Our most important elections are always staged a few days after Halloween. Coincidence? Maybe not. I'm beginning to think maybe there's a reason buried deep in the American psyche. Halloween hasn't always been about kids playing dress-up and cutely pretending to extort neighbors with the threat of trick or treat. It has its roots in ancient customs that encourage people to face their deepest fears.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 24, 2012
Re "The DIY generation," Opinion, May 20 Neal Gabler points out what to me is puzzling and disturbing: the public's - particularly the young public's - perception of President Obama as disappointing and ineffective. Their response: Forget using the voting booth as a means for change and instead get out there and meet social needs directly. Doing it yourself is a welcome first step. This young public, though - and the voting public as a whole - should now leverage its DIY response.
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OPINION
October 24, 2011
Californians tend to feel the same way about their initiative system as they do about Congress or the Legislature: They blame the collective body for a host of ills, but they like their own representatives just fine. Likewise, voters frequently express impatience with the onslaught of election-day measures, but they will vigorously protect their right to sign a petition or vote for a particular measure they believe is crucial. So how can California simultaneously wrest back some control over the initiative process and keep intact what has become virtually a birthright: the people's power to adopt laws and constitutional amendments at the voting booth?
OPINION
October 24, 2011
Californians tend to feel the same way about their initiative system as they do about Congress or the Legislature: They blame the collective body for a host of ills, but they like their own representatives just fine. Likewise, voters frequently express impatience with the onslaught of election-day measures, but they will vigorously protect their right to sign a petition or vote for a particular measure they believe is crucial. So how can California simultaneously wrest back some control over the initiative process and keep intact what has become virtually a birthright: the people's power to adopt laws and constitutional amendments at the voting booth?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2000
Less than 50% of eligible voters recognize their own self-interest by voting. It seems perverse that people will risk all for freedom when survival is involved, but when it is offered just down the block at the voting booth, well, either the issues are too complicated, or all politicians are corrupt, or "my vote doesn't matter." What the eligible nonvoter doesn't take into account is that the voting booth is the first refuge of his freedom and a counterforce to chauvinists who have prejudiced beliefs in the superiority of their own groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1988
An estimated 80% of Orange County's 1,183,166 registered voters are expected to go to the polls Tuesday, Registrar Don Tanney said. The 2,116 polling places will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. The county registrar of voters office is adding 30 phone lines to help voters who have questions on Election Day. The number is (714) 567-7600. There were 650,348 Republicans and 410,644 Democrats registered in the county as of Oct. 11, the final day of registration for Tuesday's election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2000
Using Caltech's and MIT's brainiacs is a great idea for developing a new voting machine (Dec. 15). The example of a machine that is as easy to use as an ATM gives me the chills. I have a 79-year-old mother who will not touch an ATM. I have stood in line behind people who have great difficulty getting 20 bucks out. More power to the brain power, but the task seems more difficult than putting an ATM in every voting booth. BRUCE CHRISTENSEN South Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990
After reading Daniel M. Weintraub's article "Campaigns Try Putting Stars in Voters' Eyes" (Part A, Oct. 28), I am not sure who to be most angry at: A society so saturated by media sound bites that it is duped into making important political decisions by rewinding that videotape brain and playing back those commercials in the voting booth or at media moguls who have literally seized not only the mind of the voter but also of the politician. What have we come to when a politician spends more time and money on PR consultants and marketing evaluators than he does with his constituents discussing the issues?
OPINION
October 27, 2004 | Letty Cottin Pogrebin, Letty Cottin Pogrebin, a founding editor of Ms. Magazine, is a co-founder of GrannyVoter.org. Her most recent book is "Three Daughters" (Penguin Books, 2003).
Last primary day, I let my eldest grandson, Ethan, 7, cast my vote. We stood in line at my polling place and entered the voting booth together. He pulled the metal bar to close the curtain. In the hush of that small enclosure, I told him, "Today, you're helping me vote for the candidates I've chosen. But when you grow up, you'll be able to decide for yourself." His blue eyes widened with the wonder of that power.
OPINION
May 24, 2012
Re "The DIY generation," Opinion, May 20 Neal Gabler points out what to me is puzzling and disturbing: the public's - particularly the young public's - perception of President Obama as disappointing and ineffective. Their response: Forget using the voting booth as a means for change and instead get out there and meet social needs directly. Doing it yourself is a welcome first step. This young public, though - and the voting public as a whole - should now leverage its DIY response.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2009 | David G. Savage
The Supreme Court served notice Friday it may make a far-reaching change in civil rights law this year and knock down a pair of long-standing rules that give special protections to minorities in the workplace and in the voting booth. The justices, after meeting privately, announced they had voted to hear two cases that concern the lingering role of race in American life. The cases could put the court on a collision course with the incoming Obama administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2008 | STEVE LOPEZ
The moment was captured by Times photographer Gary Friedman in August, when Maria Reyes, an 86-year-old native of El Salvador, became a U.S. citizen. "Look at this," Friedman said at the time, dropping a copy of his picture on my desk. He had been at the ceremony working on an unrelated assignment but was struck by this scene. I could see why. The picture of Reyes holding her small U.S. flag has an Ellis Island quality to it, tinted with loss and hope.
OPINION
August 27, 2008
Re "Pulpit and ballot," editorial, Aug. 21 Archbishop Raymond Burke may be focused on the relationship between religion, abortion and politics; however, Catholic voters are united in their aversion to mixing politics and religion. In a recent poll by Catholics for Choice, 70% of those polled said that the views of Catholic bishops were unimportant to them in deciding for whom to vote, and 73% said that they believed Catholic politicians were under no religious obligation to vote on issues as the bishops recommend.
WORLD
June 28, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
James Moyo's eyes blinked open at 5 a.m. Friday, an election day that promised despair. Moyo felt profound gloom, yet he could not let go of a thread of hope that maybe Zimbabwe would be brave enough to vote against President Robert Mugabe. "I was thinking, 'Today, I am going to vote. But, yes! I am going to vote for the party of my choice!' " Moyo said, noting that opposition candidate Morgan Tsvangirai remained on the ballot though he had withdrawn this week from the presidential runoff.
OPINION
July 31, 2007 | JONAH GOLDBERG
Can you name all three branches of government? Can you name even one? Do you know who your congressman is? Your senators? Do you even know how many senators each state gets? If you know the answers to these questions (and you probably do because you're a newspaper reader), you're in the minority. In fact, the data have long been settled. A very high percentage of the U.S.
OPINION
November 2, 2004 | Leo Rangell, Leo Rangell is honorary president of the International Psychoanalytic Assn. and a clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA. His book "The Mind of Watergate: An Exploration of the Compromise of Integrity" was published by W.W. Norton & Co. in 1980.
Deciding how to vote or whether to vote is a complex path. As in all decision-making, although the final act can take but a second, it is the result of a process that can reach down to your bootstraps and recapitulate your entire history. Every time you act, you first unconsciously assess the risks. Then you make a move, which is special for each situation and traverses a different and unique path in every person.
NEWS
October 30, 2000 | LAURA SESSIONS STEPP, WASHINGTON POST
Early on the morning of Election Day, Lisa Benenson of Montclair, N.J., will drag her son and daughter, 8 and 11, into the family van and head for the polls singing "God Bless America" in a really loud, off-key voice. Her kids, Will and Anya, will slip into the voting booth with her as they have every Election Day and watch as their mom selects her preferred candidates. Then the three will drive to school, singing "This Land Is Your Land."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1993 | DERMOT D. GIVENS of Los Angeles comments about the alleged vote-suppression tactics in the recent New Jersey gubernatorial election. and
When I step into a voting booth, I feel the powerlessness of my slave ancestors, the suffering of my grandparents and the anguish of my parents, who fought for me to have my civil rights. When I feel it I am compelled to vote. I feel the determination of the freedom riders, the strength of the civil-rights marchers and the commitment fo Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. I feel the dogs biting, the billy clubs striking, the sting of the water from the fire hoses. I feel the blood of all those who died.
OPINION
October 27, 2004 | Letty Cottin Pogrebin, Letty Cottin Pogrebin, a founding editor of Ms. Magazine, is a co-founder of GrannyVoter.org. Her most recent book is "Three Daughters" (Penguin Books, 2003).
Last primary day, I let my eldest grandson, Ethan, 7, cast my vote. We stood in line at my polling place and entered the voting booth together. He pulled the metal bar to close the curtain. In the hush of that small enclosure, I told him, "Today, you're helping me vote for the candidates I've chosen. But when you grow up, you'll be able to decide for yourself." His blue eyes widened with the wonder of that power.
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