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NEWS
November 29, 1996 | FAYE FIORE
It's election day. You leave work at 5 on the dot. You need to stop for milk and get home to see the children you have not seen all day. But first, you are going to vote for the next president of the United States. You navigate a level of rush hour traffic you did not know existed because you never leave work at 5 on the dot. You pull into the driveway of your neighborhood polling place just in time to hear on your car radio that the networks have projected a winner.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
November 23, 2012 | By Morley Winograd and Michael D. Hais
The lessons of the 2012 election are still being learned, but here's one we already know: We need to do more to increase voter participation. In many battleground states, the intense and highly partisan presidential campaign bumped up turnout percentages from 2008. But in most states, where the outcome of the presidential contest was predictable, voter participation fell from the historically high levels of four years ago. On top of that, there were embarrassingly long lines at the polls in many locations, something that hardly reflected positively on the nation's commitment to democracy.
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OPINION
November 23, 2012 | By Morley Winograd and Michael D. Hais
The lessons of the 2012 election are still being learned, but here's one we already know: We need to do more to increase voter participation. In many battleground states, the intense and highly partisan presidential campaign bumped up turnout percentages from 2008. But in most states, where the outcome of the presidential contest was predictable, voter participation fell from the historically high levels of four years ago. On top of that, there were embarrassingly long lines at the polls in many locations, something that hardly reflected positively on the nation's commitment to democracy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - When the California Legislature works, this is one example of how it works well. But one big caveat: We're talking about functional versus dysfunctional, leadership versus ineptitude - a system that is running smoothly rather than broken. We're not necessarily talking about a desired policy result. Sometimes you lose. (If you're a California Republican, you usually do in Sacramento.) First, the math: Gov. Jerry Brown and his legislative leader allies needed a majority vote in each house - 41 in the Assembly, 21 in the Senate - to spend the initial $8 billion in high-speed rail construction money ($4.7 billion in state bonds, $3.3 billion in federal grants)
NEWS
November 10, 1988
County Dukakis Bush Alameda 293,401 154,462 Alpine 230 306 Amador 5,071 6,743 Butte 29,420 38,551 Calaveras 5,634 7,576 Colusa 1,962 2,981 Contra Costa 157,561 144,291 Del Norte 3,569 3,688 El Dorado 19,092 3,698 Fresno 86,503 86,894 Glenn 2,894 4,943 Humboldt 28,683 20,597 Imperial 10,245 12,944 Inyo 2,597 4,907 Kern 52,454 85,647 Kings 9,154 12,130 Lake 9,549 9,126 Lassen 3,428 5,109 Los Angeles 1,312,162 1,174,215 Madera 10,475 12,989 Marin 63,316 41,607 Mariposa 2,959 3,719 Mendocino 16,844
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2011 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
Republican activists trying to overturn new state Senate districts began filing signed petitions Thursday for a California-wide referendum on the issue. Referendum proponents, calling themselves Fairness and Accountability in Redistricting (FAIR), have until Sunday to file the minimum 504,000 signatures needed to get the matter on the November 2012 ballot. FAIR charges that the maps, drawn for the first time by a citizens commission instead of the Legislature, bear "trademarks of gerrymandering" to favor Democrats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - When the California Legislature works, this is one example of how it works well. But one big caveat: We're talking about functional versus dysfunctional, leadership versus ineptitude - a system that is running smoothly rather than broken. We're not necessarily talking about a desired policy result. Sometimes you lose. (If you're a California Republican, you usually do in Sacramento.) First, the math: Gov. Jerry Brown and his legislative leader allies needed a majority vote in each house - 41 in the Assembly, 21 in the Senate - to spend the initial $8 billion in high-speed rail construction money ($4.7 billion in state bonds, $3.3 billion in federal grants)
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | BILL STALL and CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITERS
While confessing that "I am a city girl," Dianne Feinstein put on her western duds Sunday and stumped California's agricultural heartland, promising to be a friend of farming if elected governor but refusing to temper her strong support for Proposition 128, the sweeping environmental initiative. Feinstein and her Republican opponent, Sen. Pete Wilson, crisscrossed the San Joaquin Valley in search of the farm vote that conventional wisdom would concede to Wilson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- A proposed law against taking cellphones into California prisons passed a key vote Tuesday, but the measure would exempt prison employees ? considered a main source of phones used to arrange crimes from behind bars ? from screening by metal detectors as they go to work. Requiring prison guards to stand in line for airport-like security checks would cost the state millions, according to legislative analysts. That is because members of the politically powerful corrections officers union are paid for "walk time" ?
REAL ESTATE
October 21, 1990 | CATHERINE COLLINS, Collins, a veteran real estate reporter, writes from Washington on housing-related issues.
From New Jersey to Los Angeles, builders and developers, lenders and housing advocates are joining hands to build shelters for the homeless, construct affordable rental property or provide below-market financing for low-income buyers. For example, the Local Initiative Support Corp. is the intermediary for public and private sector parterships designed to fund and build low-income housing nationwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2011 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
Republican activists trying to overturn new state Senate districts began filing signed petitions Thursday for a California-wide referendum on the issue. Referendum proponents, calling themselves Fairness and Accountability in Redistricting (FAIR), have until Sunday to file the minimum 504,000 signatures needed to get the matter on the November 2012 ballot. FAIR charges that the maps, drawn for the first time by a citizens commission instead of the Legislature, bear "trademarks of gerrymandering" to favor Democrats.
OPINION
July 16, 2011
Though it is rare, the occasional American presidential election goes to the loser of the popular vote, an outcome that undermines basic notions of fairness and democracy and is an artifact of the nation's ancient electoral system. Advocates of a popular vote system have persuaded both houses of the California Legislature to adopt a measure that would lend California's support to that idea. Gov. Jerry Brown should sign it. In drafting the U.S. Constitution, the framers created a two-tiered system for electing presidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- A proposed law against taking cellphones into California prisons passed a key vote Tuesday, but the measure would exempt prison employees ? considered a main source of phones used to arrange crimes from behind bars ? from screening by metal detectors as they go to work. Requiring prison guards to stand in line for airport-like security checks would cost the state millions, according to legislative analysts. That is because members of the politically powerful corrections officers union are paid for "walk time" ?
BUSINESS
September 5, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
An insurance industry-backed bill that would make it easier for auto insurers to persuade motorists to fix their dents only at company-selected garages won a key vote Friday in the state Senate and should be on the governor's desk next week. Insurers say the bill is needed so that they can give policyholders full information about the benefits of having work done at select auto body shops. Those advantages include lifetime guarantees, fast turnarounds and quality repairs, the insurers say. But opponents -- an unlikely coalition of car dealers, auto body shops, trial attorneys and consumer activists -- contend the bill would weaken safeguards against "steering," an illegal practice in which motorists are pushed with a combination of economic incentives and penalties into taking their cars to certain body shops.
OPINION
May 20, 2009 | Joe Mathews, Joe Mathews, a contributing writer to Opinion, is an Irvine senior fellow at the New America Foundation.
The special election is over. The griping is not. Here's one pair of complaints airing more often than "Law & Order" reruns: Why does California keep having special elections? And why are we forced to digest so many measures on the same ballot? Those are good questions -- and still relevant even with Tuesday's election mercifully in our rearview mirror. In the weeks ahead, legislative leaders will have to seek a new budget-cutting deal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2008 | Phil Willon, Times Staff Writer
Hillary Rodham Clinton has munched on tacos in East Los Angeles and Barack Obama has joked around on Southern California's top Spanish-language radio program "Piolin por la Manana," both carefully orchestrated attempts to connect with wavering, undecided Latino voters like stay-at-home mother-of-two Denise Mendoza. "I think it's funny, comical even," said Mendoza, 25, of Glendale, who has tuned into most of the presidential debates and surfed through the candidate's websites.
OPINION
May 20, 2009 | Joe Mathews, Joe Mathews, a contributing writer to Opinion, is an Irvine senior fellow at the New America Foundation.
The special election is over. The griping is not. Here's one pair of complaints airing more often than "Law & Order" reruns: Why does California keep having special elections? And why are we forced to digest so many measures on the same ballot? Those are good questions -- and still relevant even with Tuesday's election mercifully in our rearview mirror. In the weeks ahead, legislative leaders will have to seek a new budget-cutting deal.
NEWS
March 7, 1996 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The Fresno lawmaker who pushed for years to get California voters into the thick of the presidential nomination process by moving the primary from June to March said this week he will work for more far-reaching reforms after this month's balloting. A more rational system would be to have five regional primaries nationwide, said state Sen. Jim Costa (D-Fresno), who began working for an earlier primary when he was in the Assembly in the early 1980s.
NEWS
June 15, 2000 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the California Legislature prepares for a showdown vote today on the state budget, welfare has emerged as a sticking point in passage of the $100-billion spending plan. Republicans, whose votes are needed for the requisite two-thirds passage, are complaining angrily that Democrats want to roll back welfare reform by making more people eligible. They point to a proposal that would exempt a recipient's first car, regardless of value, as proof that Democrats are bent on expanding welfare rolls.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | FAYE FIORE
It's election day. You leave work at 5 on the dot. You need to stop for milk and get home to see the children you have not seen all day. But first, you are going to vote for the next president of the United States. You navigate a level of rush hour traffic you did not know existed because you never leave work at 5 on the dot. You pull into the driveway of your neighborhood polling place just in time to hear on your car radio that the networks have projected a winner.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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