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Voting Eligibility

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NEWS
April 17, 1986 | MICHELE L. NORRIS, Times Staff Writer
Against the advice of two attorneys, school Trustee Caroline Coleman cast the crucial third vote for a measure that will reimburse her for $12,721 in attorney fees she spent during her felony embezzlement trial earlier this year. School district attorney Howard Knee and a lawyer in the Los Angeles County counsel's office had recommended that Coleman not vote on the reimbursement measure, saying she might have a conflict of interest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that "Latino-bashing is alive and well in Orange County," a community leader Wednesday told a group of politically active women that he believes Latino voters have been attacked by the media and government investigators because Latino power is increasing. "The day will come when we manage the Southwest," said Amin David, leader of the Latino advocacy group Los Amigos. "Help us prepare for this. Don't keep bucking us down."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1995 | from Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County election officials said Monday that newly enlisted members of Ross Perot's Reform Party are eligible to vote in today's local elections as long as they were duly registered voters before switching to the Perot organization last month. However, those who were not registered to vote in the county before signing registration cards with the Reform Party in October cannot vote today, said officials of the county registrar-recorder's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1997 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Latino leaders stood firm Wednesday behind Hermandad Mexicana Nacional, a day after documents laid out in detail the organization's alleged role in registering hundreds of noncitizens to vote. Prominent members of Orange County's Latino community said that none of the evidence revealed this week had shaken their belief that Hermandad, a Latino rights organization, has been unfairly smeared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1997 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Latino leaders stood firm Wednesday behind Hermandad Mexicana Nacional, a day after documents laid out in detail the organization's alleged role in registering hundreds of noncitizens to vote. Prominent members of Orange County's Latino community said that none of the evidence revealed this week had shaken their belief that Hermandad, a Latino rights organization, has been unfairly smeared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1996 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest number of potential voters in history have registered in Los Angeles County, making the nation's biggest county more of an electoral prize than ever in the upcoming presidential race and other campaigns. County Registrar-Recorder and Clerk Conny McCormack said that 3.9 million residents were registered to vote as of the Oct. 7 deadline for most residents. As many as 21,000 new citizens scheduled to be sworn in during the next few days can register until Oct. 29.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's top election official decided Thursday that more than 700 Los Angeles County residents--who registered to vote but said they are not U.S. citizens--should be excluded from the voter rolls for the upcoming presidential election. After questions were raised by The Times, Secretary of State Bill Jones directed voter registrars in the state's 58 counties not to put noncitizens on the voter rolls after they filled out voter registration forms under the state's new "motor voter" law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that "Latino-bashing is alive and well in Orange County," a community leader Wednesday told a group of politically active women that he believes Latino voters have been attacked by the media and government investigators because Latino power is increasing. "The day will come when we manage the Southwest," said Amin David, leader of the Latino advocacy group Los Amigos. "Help us prepare for this. Don't keep bucking us down."
NEWS
April 29, 1991 | From Associated Press
Women joined men for the first time Sunday at the Appenzell-Rhodes Interior annual meeting, where voting on local matters is carried out by a show of hands in the town square. The assembly, or Landsgemeinde, dates to the Middle Ages. Men traditionally carry swords or bayonets to indicate their voting eligibility. Women were issued yellow cards to certify that they could take part in Sunday's meeting. About half of the 4,000 people attending were women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1992 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Granting an exception to gift-reporting laws, a state ethics agency has allowed an Anaheim City Council majority to retain voting eligibility on the planned $3-billion Disneyland expansion, despite council members' acceptance of thousands of dollars' worth of free park tickets last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1996 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest number of potential voters in history have registered in Los Angeles County, making the nation's biggest county more of an electoral prize than ever in the upcoming presidential race and other campaigns. County Registrar-Recorder and Clerk Conny McCormack said that 3.9 million residents were registered to vote as of the Oct. 7 deadline for most residents. As many as 21,000 new citizens scheduled to be sworn in during the next few days can register until Oct. 29.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's top election official decided Thursday that more than 700 Los Angeles County residents--who registered to vote but said they are not U.S. citizens--should be excluded from the voter rolls for the upcoming presidential election. After questions were raised by The Times, Secretary of State Bill Jones directed voter registrars in the state's 58 counties not to put noncitizens on the voter rolls after they filled out voter registration forms under the state's new "motor voter" law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1995 | from Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County election officials said Monday that newly enlisted members of Ross Perot's Reform Party are eligible to vote in today's local elections as long as they were duly registered voters before switching to the Perot organization last month. However, those who were not registered to vote in the county before signing registration cards with the Reform Party in October cannot vote today, said officials of the county registrar-recorder's office.
NEWS
April 17, 1986 | MICHELE L. NORRIS, Times Staff Writer
Against the advice of two attorneys, school Trustee Caroline Coleman cast the crucial third vote for a measure that will reimburse her for $12,721 in attorney fees she spent during her felony embezzlement trial earlier this year. School district attorney Howard Knee and a lawyer in the Los Angeles County counsel's office had recommended that Coleman not vote on the reimbursement measure, saying she might have a conflict of interest.
OPINION
September 21, 2005
IF IT IS TRUE, as former President Jimmy Carter said, that Americans have lost faith in their voting system, then he and former Secretary of State James A. Baker III have lost a significant opportunity to help them restore it. A bipartisan commission led by Carter and Baker released a report Monday that proposes many reasonable ways to make voting a smoother and more trustworthy process -- but stops far short of addressing what really keeps people from the polls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1996 | MARY F. POLS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
THOUSAND OAKS-After struggling for more than two years to gain union representation, nurses at Columbia Los Robles Hospital/Medical Center learned Friday that they had triumphed with a solid 167-104 vote favoring unionizing.
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