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OPINION
January 17, 2009
In one of those seemingly technical cases that in fact have tremendous social significance, a tiny utility district in Austin, Texas, last week persuaded the U.S. Supreme Court to hear its argument for invalidating a critical piece of the 4-decades-old Voting Rights Act.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
A certain William Wachtel, the co-founder of WhyTuesday , an election reform group chaired by former UN Ambassador Andrew Young, wrote me over the weekend to complain that I treated Young harshly by criticizing his proposal to require Social Security to issue photo IDs. I called it "a terrible idea. " Norman Ornstein, a political scientist at the American Enterprise Institute and another co-founder of WhyTuesday, also defended the proposal, which Young mentioned at an event last week marking the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. Ornstein mounted his defense via Twitter , which only made Young's idea sound even shallower and more foolish.  What these gentlemen failed to do is explain why requiring Social Security to issue photo IDs is not a terrible idea.
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BUSINESS
April 19, 2012 | By Dawn Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
News Corp.'s board of directors temporarily suspended the voting rights of a portion of shares held by non-U.S. citizens to comply with U.S. law, according to a regulatory filing. The media conglomerate Wednesday suspended the half of the voting rights of foreign citizens who hold Class B shares in News Corp. The company said its board took the action to comply with U.S. law, which limits foreign ownership of broadcast licenses to no more than 25%. The decision would affect Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal bin Abdulaziz, who holds more than 56 million Class B shares.
OPINION
February 13, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Lending the authority of his office to an important and increasingly bipartisan cause, U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. this week called for states to do away with laws that prevent convicted felons from voting even after they have served their time. In a speech at Georgetown University, Holder noted that an estimated 5.8 million Americans are prohibited from voting because of felony convictions, and said that the impact of such exclusion on racial minorities was "disproportionate and unacceptable.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
A certain William Wachtel, the co-founder of WhyTuesday , an election reform group chaired by former UN Ambassador Andrew Young, wrote me over the weekend to complain that I treated Young harshly by criticizing his proposal to require Social Security to issue photo IDs. I called it "a terrible idea. " Norman Ornstein, a political scientist at the American Enterprise Institute and another co-founder of WhyTuesday, also defended the proposal, which Young mentioned at an event last week marking the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. Ornstein mounted his defense via Twitter , which only made Young's idea sound even shallower and more foolish.  What these gentlemen failed to do is explain why requiring Social Security to issue photo IDs is not a terrible idea.
OPINION
December 13, 1992
Voting is, in essence, the people's voice in their society. To propose, as Julian Nava does, that the right to vote be given to non-citizens is absolutely ludicrous ("Immigrant Rights Heats Up Mayoral Debate," Dec. 6). If immigrants wish to have a say in this society, they must become a part of this society. Nava states that " . . . the best way to bring them (resident aliens) into the mainstream is to allow them to participate in government." If these aliens wish to participate in our government, let them start by applying for citizenship.
NATIONAL
March 18, 2009 | Peter Wallsten and David G. Savage
The election of Barack Obama as president has been hailed as a crowning achievement of America's civil rights movement, the triumph of a black candidate in a nation with a history of slavery and segregation. But in a twist, Obama's success has emerged as a central argument from conservatives who say his victory proves that some of the nation's most protective civil rights laws can be erased from the books.
OPINION
January 29, 2014
Re "Fixing the Voting Rights Act," Editorial, Jan. 24 There isn't any legislation needed. The Supreme Court's decision last year was aimed at only one section of the Voting Rights Act; the rest remains in full force. As The Times recognizes, the Justice Department and civil rights groups are now using those other provisions to try to advance their agendas. All that's different is that lawyers have to prove racial discrimination before they can get court relief, which is the way every other civil rights law works.
OPINION
January 24, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
When the Supreme Court struck down a key portion of the Voting Rights Act last year, it seemed impossible that a divided Congress would be able to agree on new legislation that would satisfy the court's concerns and restore robust enforcement of the landmark civil rights law. But a creative new proposal may confound the cynics. Last June, the court by a 5-4 vote struck down the formula used in the Voting Rights Act to determine which states and localities must "pre-clear" voting procedures with the Justice Department or a federal court in Washington.
NEWS
January 16, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers announced Thursday bipartisan legislation that would restore key protections of the Voting Rights Act that were thrown out by the Supreme Court last summer. The bill would also establish new criteria to determine whether states need to seek federal approval for proposed changes to voting rules. The legislation is a response to the high court's ruling in June that Southern states had been unfairly singled out by the long-standing formula used to determine which states must seek federal "pre-clearance" before changing their voting laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2013 | By Jean Merl
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge, who earlier this year found the city of Palmdale to be in violation of the California Voting Rights Act, has ordered the city to hold a new by-district election for its four City Council posts. In a ruling dated last week and received by the involved parties over the weekend, Judge Mark V. Mooney ordered that the special election, to replace the balloting for council seats held last month, is to be conducted June 3, the same day as the California primary.
OPINION
October 4, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
It's been well over two months since the city of Palmdale was found to be in violation of the California Voting found to be in violation of the California Voting Rights Act. A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge concluded in July that city elections had been characterized by "racially polarized voting" and that the at-large system for electing the City Council and the mayor put blacks and Latinos at a disadvantage. This week, Judge Mark V. Mooney followed up by granting an injunction to halt the city's municipal at-large elections next month.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff, This post has been updated. See below for details.
WASHINGTON -- Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), the veteran civil rights activist, urged the country to remember and build on the progress of the last five decades during a speech at the 50th anniversary celebration of the March on Washington. "Sometimes I hear people saying, 'Nothing has changed,' " Lewis said. "Come and walk in my shoes. " Lewis, who was the youngest speaker at the original 1963 event, grew up in the cotton fields of Alabama and has served in Congress for more than 25 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
Reacting to a Supreme Court ruling that struck down part of the Voting Rights Act, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors approved a resolution Tuesday urging federal leaders to pass legislation to update the act so that it protects voters from disenfranchisement and passes Constitutional muster. “We want to keep democracy vibrant and make sure all those who wish to participate and have a right to participate not be denied” the ability to vote, said board chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas, who sponsored the motion along with Supervisor Gloria Molina.
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
SAN FRANCISCO -- Hillary Rodham Clinton continued her long, slow flirtation with the 2016 presidential campaign Monday, delivering the first in a promised series of speeches on restoring faith in government and other institutions corroded by cynicism. The topic of her first address, delivered before the American Bar Association convention in San Francisco, focused on voting rights and the recent Supreme Court decision striking down the heart of the historic 1965 Voting Rights Act. "Unless the hole opened up by the Supreme Court is fixed ... citizens will be disenfranchised, victimized by the law, instead of served by it," Clinton said,  and "that historical progress for a more perfect union will go backwards, instead of forward.
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