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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2000
In your Dec. 23 editorial ("No 'Florida' Here") you write, "But the computer retains a record of each vote cast." As someone who works in the field of computer security, this gives me no assurance. I have no way of knowing that the record retained correctly reflects what I confirm on the touch screen, other than "trust" in the programmer. We all know programmers never make mistakes. (Have you used Word lately?) A better solution would be to have the system print a machine- and human-readable record of the vote and a receipt for the vote, with the printed record going into the ballot box for counting purposes.
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BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Wish you could vote online? Who doesn't? For those of us who do everything from shopping to banking from the comfort of our computers, waiting in long lines to do something as simple as putting a few inky marks on a piece of a paper feels like the equivalent of chiseling your vote in stone. Hasn't anyone invented some technology that we can tap or click on without having to leave the house or the office to make this all go faster and more efficiently? The answer is yes and no. There are several people and companies working on technologies that would allow people to use their computers to vote.
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BUSINESS
July 8, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission voted 4-1 on Thursday to limit companies' use of an important anti-takeover strategy. The commission adopted a so-called one-share, one-vote rule limiting the circumstances under which the stock exchanges and the over-the-counter market may list or quote the price of securities with unequal voting rights. But the commission in Washington substantially watered down the rule before adopting it.
WORLD
March 4, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Caesar Ahmed
Three polling stations in Baghdad were struck by explosions that killed at least 14 people Thursday, an apparent attempt to sow fear before elections Sunday that Iraqis hope will stabilize their country after years of bloodshed. The attacks were launched as security forces and hospital patients cast the first ballots in the parliamentary elections that will choose the next four-year government. The bombings came a day after similar assaults in the northeastern city of Baqubah that killed more than 30 people.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Wish you could vote online? Who doesn't? For those of us who do everything from shopping to banking from the comfort of our computers, waiting in long lines to do something as simple as putting a few inky marks on a piece of a paper feels like the equivalent of chiseling your vote in stone. Hasn't anyone invented some technology that we can tap or click on without having to leave the house or the office to make this all go faster and more efficiently? The answer is yes and no. There are several people and companies working on technologies that would allow people to use their computers to vote.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
Prompted by a wave of concern after the death of a municipal employee, the West Hollywood City Council declared Monday that the city will not discriminate against AIDS victims in hiring or granting health benefits. The City Council also agreed to match employee contributions toward a $12,000 emergency fund that is intended to help city workers stricken by the disease.
WORLD
October 20, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
After three days and 35 rounds of voting, Guatemala and Venezuela agreed Thursday to a timeout until next week in their deadlocked contest for a U.N. Security Council seat. Latin American and Caribbean diplomats hope to come up with a compromise candidate by the time voting resumes Wednesday, after the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr on Monday and Tuesday.
WORLD
November 20, 2004 | Esther Schrader and Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writers
Despite the recent U.S. offensive to wrest Fallouja from militants, security in many Sunni Muslim-dominated areas of Iraq has worsened, thwarting reconstruction efforts and threatening planned January elections, U.S. officials said Friday. Security in the so-called Sunni Triangle, as well as the northern city of Mosul, is poorer than it was six weeks ago, said William Taylor, director of the reconstruction office at the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1999 | COLL METCALFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two hours of deliberation, a Simi Valley jury Thursday cleared a security guard accused in a lawsuit of torching an auto dealership two years ago so he could be a hero. Jurors decided unanimously that Michael Sinclair, 43, did not start the November 1996 fire that gutted the Mike Wallace Ford dealership in Oxnard. The early morning blaze caused more than $3 million in damage, including the destruction of several new cars, and sent two firefighters to the hospital.
WORLD
March 4, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Caesar Ahmed
Three polling stations in Baghdad were struck by explosions that killed at least 14 people Thursday, an apparent attempt to sow fear before elections Sunday that Iraqis hope will stabilize their country after years of bloodshed. The attacks were launched as security forces and hospital patients cast the first ballots in the parliamentary elections that will choose the next four-year government. The bombings came a day after similar assaults in the northeastern city of Baqubah that killed more than 30 people.
WORLD
October 20, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
After three days and 35 rounds of voting, Guatemala and Venezuela agreed Thursday to a timeout until next week in their deadlocked contest for a U.N. Security Council seat. Latin American and Caribbean diplomats hope to come up with a compromise candidate by the time voting resumes Wednesday, after the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr on Monday and Tuesday.
WORLD
November 20, 2004 | Esther Schrader and Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writers
Despite the recent U.S. offensive to wrest Fallouja from militants, security in many Sunni Muslim-dominated areas of Iraq has worsened, thwarting reconstruction efforts and threatening planned January elections, U.S. officials said Friday. Security in the so-called Sunni Triangle, as well as the northern city of Mosul, is poorer than it was six weeks ago, said William Taylor, director of the reconstruction office at the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2000
In your Dec. 23 editorial ("No 'Florida' Here") you write, "But the computer retains a record of each vote cast." As someone who works in the field of computer security, this gives me no assurance. I have no way of knowing that the record retained correctly reflects what I confirm on the touch screen, other than "trust" in the programmer. We all know programmers never make mistakes. (Have you used Word lately?) A better solution would be to have the system print a machine- and human-readable record of the vote and a receipt for the vote, with the printed record going into the ballot box for counting purposes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1999 | COLL METCALFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two hours of deliberation, a Simi Valley jury Thursday cleared a security guard accused in a lawsuit of torching an auto dealership two years ago so he could be a hero. Jurors decided unanimously that Michael Sinclair, 43, did not start the November 1996 fire that gutted the Mike Wallace Ford dealership in Oxnard. The early morning blaze caused more than $3 million in damage, including the destruction of several new cars, and sent two firefighters to the hospital.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission voted 4-1 on Thursday to limit companies' use of an important anti-takeover strategy. The commission adopted a so-called one-share, one-vote rule limiting the circumstances under which the stock exchanges and the over-the-counter market may list or quote the price of securities with unequal voting rights. But the commission in Washington substantially watered down the rule before adopting it.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
Prompted by a wave of concern after the death of a municipal employee, the West Hollywood City Council declared Monday that the city will not discriminate against AIDS victims in hiring or granting health benefits. The City Council also agreed to match employee contributions toward a $12,000 emergency fund that is intended to help city workers stricken by the disease.
NEWS
November 12, 1988 | CLAUDIA LUTHER and STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writers
Orange County's GOP chairman said Friday that he had agreed to use party funds to hire Election Day observers at polls in the 72nd Assembly District, but that the chief consultant to the district's Republican candidate decided that those observers should be uniformed guards. Controversy erupted Tuesday when the guards showed up at 7 a.m.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Bidding for a heavy turnout, Iranian authorities extended voting by two hours in Friday's presidential elections, which parliamentary Speaker Hashemi Rafsanjani was favored to win in a landslide. The polls finally closed at 7 p.m., according to a report of the Iranian national news agency monitored here. The result is not expected to be released until Sunday. Rafsanjani, a centrist, faced token opposition from a single candidate, former Agriculture Minister Abbas Sheibani.
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