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Voting System

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NEWS
April 18, 2011 | Amy Reiter, Los Angeles Times
In the wake of all the what-went-wrong, post-Pia Toscano hand-wringing (not to mention the Casey Abrams near ouster) in recent weeks, there's been a lot of talk about a need to revisit the way voting works on "American Idol. " And the people doing the talking aren't just fans bereft of their favorite singers. "Idol" producer Nigel Lythgoe recently said the show might consider adopting a system in which "Idol" voters determined the bottom three, and then the judges decided which contestant would be sent home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
We've done the "Hustle. " (Wait. Wrong link. Try this .) We've been to outer space . Hell, we've even been blindfolded and taken on a spaceship all the way to Neptune . And now, tonight, at 5:30 p.m. PST, it all comes to a (we hope) glorious end with the 86th Academy Awards live from the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. What can we expect from tonight's show? Here are five moments to watch: OSCARS 2014: Full coverage | Complete list | Top nominees and winners What movie will win best picture?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2000
It's time to not only look at dumping the electoral college, but at creating a uniform voting system that can be used nationally. It's apparent that punch cards are too confusing for many people. One simple safeguard we ought to incorporate is photo ID. Except for absentee ballots, everyone casting a vote should bring a photo ID with them to validate who they say they are. To just stand there and say you are so and so, sign your name and get a ballot invites fraud. The whole thing screams for reform, and we need to do it by 2004!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
You should have your Oscar pool by now. Twenty-four categories. One hundred and twenty-one choices. And, no, "The Lego Movie" is not among them. (Next year. Next year.) We've been here for you for the last six months, starting back in September when "12 Years a Slave" and "Gravity" pulled to the front of the pack after wowing at the Telluride and Toronto film festivals. And here we are ... yes, same as it ever was , with the Oscars coming around the bend on Sunday. So, one last time, the envelopes, please.
OPINION
May 21, 2007
Re "No way to run an election," Opinion, May 17 Steven Hill and Lynn Serpe are right on with recommending ranked-choice voting. It's not just San Francisco but other countries, such as Ireland and Australia and increasingly Britain, successfully using it. Not only does it save money by eliminating the need for runoff elections, it captures the complexity of voter opinion. Voters can pick their first-choice candidate and party without fear because the whole concept of a "spoiler" is eliminated in that system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2003
Orange County will get a $26.1-million electronic voting system that will reshape the way voters cast ballots, the Board of Supervisors decided Tuesday. The state and federal government have allocated billions of dollars to upgrade local voting systems since the controversy over the Florida presidential vote in 2000, said Steve Rodermund, the county's interim registrar of voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An electronic voting system with a paper trail that was used in Nevada elections last year is the first approved for use in California. Secretary of State Kevin Shelley on Friday certified the Sequoia Voting Systems machine for use next year. The machine prints a paper record of a voter's choices, which the voter can double-check via computer screen for accuracy. San Bernardino County tested the Oakland-based company's machine in one precinct during the November presidential election.
OPINION
December 16, 2004
Re "For Some, the Race Remains Far From Over," Dec. 12: Your article about the presidential election neglects to bring out a key point: We cannot know if there was fraud in this election or any future elections until the system is fundamentally reformed. One measure that is absolutely essential is to require that all electronic voting machines produce a verifiable paper trail. In the meantime, the major discrepancies between exit polling and voter tallies are good reason to feel uneasy about the fairness of this election, and these doubts cannot be resolved until the raw exit poll data are subject to an independent analysis.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
An error with an electronic voting system gave President Bush 3,893 extra votes in suburban Columbus, elections officials said Friday. Franklin County's unofficial results had Bush receiving 4,258 votes to Democrat John Kerry's 260 votes in a precinct in Gahanna. Records show only 638 voters cast ballots in that precinct. Bush's total should have been recorded as 365, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2003 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
The Orange County Board of Supervisors will decide Tuesday whether to begin negotiations to buy a $25-million computerized voting system to replace aging punch-card machines that have caused numerous election-night snafus in recent years. The registrar of voters will present the board with three options but have recommended the Maximus/Hart InterCivic system rather than a popular touch-screen type. The Maximus/Hart machine uses a wheel that allows voters to highlight selected candidates.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
Oscar balloting ended Tuesday, which means two things: (1) Academy members no longer have to feel guilty about not watching that "12 Years a Slave" screener, and (2) it's time to gather The Envelope's Buzzmeter panelists together for one last powwow before the show Sunday. Here, in the first of two installments, Entertainment Weekly's Anthony Breznican, Fandango's Dave Karger, Anne Thompson from Thompson on Hollywood, the Los Angeles Times' Betsy Sharkey and Glenn Whipp, and Gold Derby's Tom O'Neil call the close best-picture race, debate whether an "American Hustle" shutout is in the cards and offer their choices for the season's most overhyped story.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
The last time Oscar voters surprised with a best picture winner came eight years ago when Jack Nicholson opened the evening's final envelope, arched those famous eyebrows and announced "Crash. " He then mouthed the word " Whoa!" Most years, Hollywood insiders have a good idea who will go home with an Academy Award. By the time the Oscars are handed out at the end of a long awards season, clear favorites have emerged from earlier contests.  FULL COVERAGE: Oscars 2014 Going into Sunday's 86th Academy Awards, there are front-runners in the acting, directing and writing categories.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - A ballot measure to overturn a Republican-backed state bill that made sweeping changes to Arizona election law was certified this week as having more than enough valid signatures, but on Friday opponents vowed to challenge those signatures in court. The effort to block the measure is the latest round in a growing fight in Arizona that revolves around voter participation and allegations of fraud. Democrats contend that the Republican-led Legislature passed the measure in June as part of a bigger movement to make it more difficult for minorities to vote and third-party candidates to run in the state.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
An Arizona plan to tighten voter registration would create a two-tiered voting system in time for next year's elections but affect only several thousand people, some of whom could be denied participation in state and local elections, state officials said Tuesday. Voting rights activists, however, said that many more eligible voters probably would choose not to participate because of confusion over the new plan, which is expected to be challenged in court. The new system will essentially have separate voter rolls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
When Anaheim Mayor Tom Tait was elected nearly three years ago, he was the easy favorite. The Republican had the support of the city's longtime outgoing mayor and its business community. He ran on a ticket alongside two winning council candidates. Tait was well poised to wield power. Three years later, Tait's positions on controversial issues have so angered former allies that he has become a lone wolf, constantly at odds with the rest of the City Council. Last year, the council voted to slash his staff budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- The California secretary of state's office and counties have wasted millions of dollars in federal funds on failed or ineffective voting systems, the state auditor found in a report released Thursday. Auditor Elaine Howle said counties have spent $22 million in federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) funds “replacing voting systems with new systems that counties and voters cannot fully use.” The auditor noted that $4.4 million was spent on a new statewide computerized voter registration database, known as VoteCal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2005 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles city election results were delayed for several hours Tuesday night because dense fog grounded the helicopters that normally fly ballots downtown from distant parts of the city. City Clerk Frank Martinez said a new voting system, being used by his office for the first time, also slowed the counting because officials took extra time to inspect the ballots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2006 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Ventura County election officials are replacing their decades-old punch-card voting system in time for the June 6 primary election. After more than 30 years of voting with punch cards, most county voters will now mark their choices with ink. Those who have trouble seeing the ballots or using the pens will be able to vote on computer touch screens. County officials say their new systems will serve Spanish-speaking voters better and ensure that those who are disabled can cast secret ballots.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
When Isaac Galvan won a seat on the Compton City Council last month, the 26-year-old made history, becoming the first Latino elected to the council. But as The Times' Abby Sewell and Angel Jennings reported Monday, Galvan's victory is already at risk of being eclipsed by questions about his failure to file any of the required campaign finance disclosures for the primary and runoff elections, as well as his decision to hire an aide with criminal convictions for political misconduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2013 | By Frank Shyong and Joseph Serna
In a new critique of how minorities are treated in the Antelope Valley, a judge has ruled that Palmdale violated state voting laws by maintaining an election system that stymied Latinos and blacks from winning office. The judge's findings come a month after the U.S. Justice Department accused Palmdale, Lancaster and the L.A. County Sheriff's Department of a systematic effort to discriminate against minorities who received low-income subsidized housing. Federal officials said deputies conducted widespread unlawful searches of homes, improper detentions and used unreasonable force that specifically targeted blacks and Latinos.
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