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NEWS
September 7, 1988 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
From the moment Dan Quayle was picked by George Bush last month, comparisons between the young, blond Indiana senator and actor Robert Redford made the presidential campaign suddenly sound like a casting call. In his quest for the vice presidency, some Republican pros stated, Quayle would certainly be a big hit with women, a bridge over the so-called gender gap. "He runs well in Indiana among women," a male Indiana delegate said. But is it true? Do looks make a candidate?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
As Los Angeles faces the possibility of having no women holding elected office at City Hall come July, some of California's most well-known female politicians joined forces to promote Wendy Greuel's mayoral bid. Greuel was endorsed by U.S. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who appeared Thursday alongside other politicians who had already endorsed Greuel, including Sen. Barbara Boxer, and Reps. Janice Hahn and Judy Chu. In the evening, Boxer headlined a fundraiser for Greuel that was also hosted by EMILY'S List, an organization devoted to promoting pro-choice, Democratic women.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
As Los Angeles faces the possibility of having no women holding elected office at City Hall come July, some of California's most well-known female politicians joined forces to promote Wendy Greuel's mayoral bid. Greuel was endorsed by U.S. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who appeared Thursday alongside other politicians who had already endorsed Greuel, including Sen. Barbara Boxer, and Reps. Janice Hahn and Judy Chu. In the evening, Boxer headlined a fundraiser for Greuel that was also hosted by EMILY'S List, an organization devoted to promoting pro-choice, Democratic women.
OPINION
March 1, 2013
After more than a year of bitter partisan fighting, Congress on Thursday finally reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act, including new provisions that will extend the law's protections for gay, lesbian, transgender and Native American victims of domestic violence. It's about time. There is no rational explanation for why lawmakers took so long to reauthorize this legislation, which was first enacted in 1994 and had been renewed twice with broad bipartisan support. Admittedly, the revised law covers a broader group of victims.
OPINION
March 1, 2013
After more than a year of bitter partisan fighting, Congress on Thursday finally reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act, including new provisions that will extend the law's protections for gay, lesbian, transgender and Native American victims of domestic violence. It's about time. There is no rational explanation for why lawmakers took so long to reauthorize this legislation, which was first enacted in 1994 and had been renewed twice with broad bipartisan support. Admittedly, the revised law covers a broader group of victims.
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | From Reuters
The Church of England synod voted Tuesday in favor of women becoming priests in a historic decision taken against the advice of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Robert A. K. Runcie. The decision by the synod, the church's parliament, to pass church legislation allowing the ordination of women is the first major hurdle the new law must pass in a process that could take up to four years.
NEWS
June 1, 1987
The elite California Club, for 100 years an all-male institution, announced today it has asked its members to vote by the end of the month for a change in its bylaws that would allow the admission of women as regular members.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Members of Skull and Bones, the oldest and most prestigious secret society at Yale University in New Haven, Conn., will vote next month on whether to admit women to the all-male club. The vote by the 700 members is an attempt to resolve the divisive issue without having to face a showdown in court. Conservative columnist William F. Buckley Jr. and seven other Skull and Bones members had obtained a temporary injunction from a Superior Court judge stalling plans for the induction of women.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1995 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Only 75 years ago, after decades of bitter struggle, women finally won the right to vote. Today only a minority of Americans, men and women, choose to exercise their voting rights. That fact gives "Susan B. Anthony Slept Here," tonight's chirpy celebration of the passing of the 19th Amendment, an ironic resonance. "20/20" reporter Lynn Sherr hosts the show, which is based on the book she co-wrote with Jurate Kazickas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1995 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anyone interested in the cause of intelligent television has to be grateful for producer Lucy Pollak's two-hour "American Experience" special, "One Woman, One Vote." Many viewers--especially young, female ones--should gain something from this narrative history of the U.S. campaign to secure women's right to vote. But will those young, female viewers, along with everyone else, still be awake by the time the suffragists end their 72-year campaign in triumph in 1920?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1995 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Only 75 years ago, after decades of bitter struggle, women finally won the right to vote. Today only a minority of Americans, men and women, choose to exercise their voting rights. That fact gives "Susan B. Anthony Slept Here," tonight's chirpy celebration of the passing of the 19th Amendment, an ironic resonance. "20/20" reporter Lynn Sherr hosts the show, which is based on the book she co-wrote with Jurate Kazickas.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Members of Skull and Bones, the oldest and most prestigious secret society at Yale University in New Haven, Conn., will vote next month on whether to admit women to the all-male club. The vote by the 700 members is an attempt to resolve the divisive issue without having to face a showdown in court. Conservative columnist William F. Buckley Jr. and seven other Skull and Bones members had obtained a temporary injunction from a Superior Court judge stalling plans for the induction of women.
NEWS
September 7, 1988 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
From the moment Dan Quayle was picked by George Bush last month, comparisons between the young, blond Indiana senator and actor Robert Redford made the presidential campaign suddenly sound like a casting call. In his quest for the vice presidency, some Republican pros stated, Quayle would certainly be a big hit with women, a bridge over the so-called gender gap. "He runs well in Indiana among women," a male Indiana delegate said. But is it true? Do looks make a candidate?
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | From Reuters
The Church of England synod voted Tuesday in favor of women becoming priests in a historic decision taken against the advice of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Robert A. K. Runcie. The decision by the synod, the church's parliament, to pass church legislation allowing the ordination of women is the first major hurdle the new law must pass in a process that could take up to four years.
NEWS
June 1, 1987
The elite California Club, for 100 years an all-male institution, announced today it has asked its members to vote by the end of the month for a change in its bylaws that would allow the admission of women as regular members.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher
WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama signed into law Thursday the Violence Against Women Act, formally ending a battle fought in Congress in the last year over controversial changes to the act. In a public ceremony in Washington, Obama said this year's legislation expands an act that has altered the culture surrounding domestic violence in America. The bill extends federal aid to gay, immigrant and tribal victims, while adding services for its original beneficiaries and a large voting bloc: women.
NEWS
April 29, 1991 | From Associated Press
Women joined men for the first time Sunday at the Appenzell-Rhodes Interior annual meeting, where voting on local matters is carried out by a show of hands in the town square. The assembly, or Landsgemeinde, dates to the Middle Ages. Men traditionally carry swords or bayonets to indicate their voting eligibility. Women were issued yellow cards to certify that they could take part in Sunday's meeting. About half of the 4,000 people attending were women.
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