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TRAVEL
August 18, 1991
I absolutely agree with Jack Adler's article concerning traveler confusion with connecting terms such as "direct" and "nonstop" ("Seeking Truth in Air Advertising," July 21). As a flight attendant for 13 years, I can vouch for the numerous misunderstandings. This must be uniformly changed. I believe that a basic consumer marketing principle should be, if the majority of your consumers are using a product incorrectly, then the directions should be changed. LESLIE DeBICCAR Hermosa Beach
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
A man who worked security for Michael Jackson testified Wednesday that he introduced the singer to Conrad Murray, the doctor who later administered the fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol to the singer more than two years later. Jeffrey Adams testified he was "positive" the first time Jackson and Murray met was in February 2007. Adams' video deposition, given under oath, was played to jurors in the wrongful death lawsuit filed by Jackson's mother and three children against concert promoter and producer AEG Live and three of its executives.
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MAGAZINE
September 15, 1991
Foster slammed UCLA Extension for its extensive roster of writing classes and for its outlandish names, such as "If You Can Talk, You Can Write." I recently took "If You Can Talk,You Can Write" from Joel Saltzman at UCLA Extension. I cannot vouch for other adorably titled writing courses at UCLA, but this one is a winner. It was the best, most productive and creative six weeks I've spent in years. CARRIE FREEMAN North Hollywood
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Reprising his role as one of the campaign's top surrogates, Bill Clinton testifies on behalf of President Obama's capacity to boost employment in a new campaign ad launched Thursday. The spot represents how the Obama campaign feels Clinton can best help the president's reelection bid, using what they say is Clinton's strong credibility on the economy to confront Republican attacks on the president's job record. In the ad, Clinton says that the Obama plan to grow the middle class mirrors “what happened when I was president.” “This election to me is about which candidate is more likely to return us to full employment,” Clinton says in the 30-second spot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1994
I would like to respond to your article about the proposed Newport Beach Backpacker's Hostel ("Backpacker Hostel Plan to Be Heard," April 21). I am a single mother in my 40s and I have lived in Newport Beach for 34 years. I was privileged to be able to backpack throughout Europe several times in my youth because I stayed exclusively in hostels. In those days, my budget was $2 a day for food and lodging. If it weren't for the safety and security of the hostels, I wouldn't have had the delightful experiences that I did. I can vouch that there are strict rules and conditions.
OPINION
August 11, 2008
Re "Psychotherapy increasingly takes a back seat to pills, study finds," Aug. 5 The headline on the article is wholly misleading. It implies that psychotherapy in general is being replaced by medication. As a psychologist with a busy private practice, I can vouch that this couldn't be further from the truth. The real headline should be "Psychiatrists provide less psychotherapy due to lower compensation rates." Research has substantiated that sometimes, under certain conditions, medication does work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1996
As a loyal Republican, I was offended by your Column One article in the July 7 Times ("GOP in O.C.: Setting Sights on the State"). You claim that on election day in Orange County the drill is always the same: Each Republican "must state his or her name and then point to another person who can vouch that he or she is, indeed, a registered Republican." You claim "this ritual continues until the last person is . . . vouched for." Who told you that story? I am serving in my 10th (and last)
SPORTS
September 19, 1996 | EARL GUSTKEY
Is Chad Morton, at 5 feet 8 and 170 pounds, too small to be a full-time tailback? Mike Garrett, USC's athletic director, doesn't think so. Garrett won the 1965 Heisman Trophy at USC at 5-9 and 185 pounds. "Chad could carry the ball 20 to 50 times a game and be at no more risk for injury than a 200-pounder," he said. "He's special. He's the most talented running back I've seen around here in 12 years."
OPINION
March 10, 2002
In the ongoing debate over school vouchers, one reason for having vouchers goes unsaid: They can provide parents leverage in dealings with school districts. A top-heavy district bureaucracy and go-along school board might react differently to angry parents holding petitions with hundreds of signatures threatening student departure. The threat of loss of hundreds of thousands of dollars--if not millions--might cause districts to pay heed to parents' voices. Actually using a voucher to remove a child from a district would be a secondary effect.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
The state's chief elections officer is standing by its touch-screen voting machines after a review prompted by complaints that some of the devices had incorrectly recorded votes. Secretary of State Betty Ireland says a technician from manufacturer Election Systems & Software has checked all the iVotronic machines in Putnam and Jackson counties. A handful of residents in each had alleged that machines switched their votes from Democratic to Republican candidates in several races. Ireland has asked all 55 county clerks to recalibrate their machines each morning during early voting, which runs until Nov. 1, and on election day, Nov. 4.
NATIONAL
November 29, 2011 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Trying to blunt a backlash from Republicans who balked at his support for tuition benefits for children of illegal immigrants, Rick Perry sought to reassure voters of his law-and-order credentials Tuesday: He brought in Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Arizona to vouch for his toughness on border security. Pledging to "detain and deport every illegal alien who is apprehended in this country," Perry repeatedly promised to devote thousands of National Guard troops, as well as Border Patrol agents, to securing the border within a year.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer
The celebrity endorsements of former KB Home Chief Executive Bruce Karatz resumed Friday morning when billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad took the witness stand to defend the character of the man federal prosecutors say made millions of dollars in illegal profits by secretly backdating stock options. Broad, who co-founded the company that became KB Home in 1957 and later operated SunAmerica insurance company, told jurors that he had known Karatz for 38 years and considered him to be a man of impeccable integrity.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Former KB Home chief Bruce Karatz turned to a powerful ally Thursday in his defense against stock-options backdating charges, presenting former Los Angeles Mayor Richard J. Riordan as the first of his character witnesses. Riordan, who served as mayor from 1993 to 2001, told jurors at the federal courthouse in Los Angeles that he's known Karatz for 30 years, considers him a close friend and does not believe Karatz would knowingly commit a crime. "I think he's an outstanding character who respects the law. He has a very high level of integrity," said Riordan, whose voice was so powerful that defense attorney John Keker instructed him to back away from the microphone.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
The state's chief elections officer is standing by its touch-screen voting machines after a review prompted by complaints that some of the devices had incorrectly recorded votes. Secretary of State Betty Ireland says a technician from manufacturer Election Systems & Software has checked all the iVotronic machines in Putnam and Jackson counties. A handful of residents in each had alleged that machines switched their votes from Democratic to Republican candidates in several races. Ireland has asked all 55 county clerks to recalibrate their machines each morning during early voting, which runs until Nov. 1, and on election day, Nov. 4.
OPINION
August 11, 2008
Re "Psychotherapy increasingly takes a back seat to pills, study finds," Aug. 5 The headline on the article is wholly misleading. It implies that psychotherapy in general is being replaced by medication. As a psychologist with a busy private practice, I can vouch that this couldn't be further from the truth. The real headline should be "Psychiatrists provide less psychotherapy due to lower compensation rates." Research has substantiated that sometimes, under certain conditions, medication does work.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2006 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Jack Chang flashes a crooked smile. His discolored teeth crowd together like old tombstones. "I know why you come!" the Taiwanese-born cafe owner exclaims to Donna Cooke, one of his most loyal customers. "You want more peanut milk!" Chang schemed up the unlikely beverage when his teeth, loosened by gum disease, drove him to find a painless way to consume peanuts, a favorite food since childhood. The creation had unexpected benefits, Chang says: It cured his gums and even slowed his baldness.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2000 | Associated Press
Federal auto safety officials will ask Mitsubishi to vouch for the quality of cars it has sold in the United States, after the auto maker's parent company admitted to systematically concealing consumer complaints in Japan. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration was preparing a letter to Mitsubishi Motor Sales of America, posing questions about the safety of cars sold to Americans. NHTSA has no evidence that Mitsubishi had failed to report problems with its cars to U.S. authorities.
OPINION
January 8, 2006
DURING THE FIRST FEW YEARS of a school voucher program in Cleveland in the 1990s, many parents exercised their newfound freedom of educational choice by enrolling their children in private schools that ferried students to and from home in taxis. So much for spending money in the classroom. Eventually, public outrage over the waste of tax dollars ended that practice. But it remains a prime example of how parental choice doesn't necessarily lead to better education.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2004 | From Associated Press
A federal judge in Birmingham, Ala. has rejected a challenge by Richard Scrushy, the fired chief executive of HealthSouth Corp., to the new corporate fraud law adopted after a series of major accounting scandals. In the first court test of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act -- which requires top executives of public corporations to vouch for the financial reports of their companies -- U.S. District Judge Karon O.
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