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Voucher Initiative

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000
As the presidents of the teacher associations in the Santa Clarita Valley, representing more than 2,000 teachers, we strongly urge a no vote on Proposition 38, the voucher initiative. Teachers have joined other supporters of public education this fall in a forceful campaign to defeat this threat to our schools. This coalition includes Gov. Gray Davis, the state PTA, the California School Boards Assn., the Assn. of California School Administrators, Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn., California Professional Firefighters and the California Nurses Assn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000
As the presidents of the teacher associations in the Santa Clarita Valley, representing more than 2,000 teachers, we strongly urge a no vote on Proposition 38, the voucher initiative. Teachers have joined other supporters of public education this fall in a forceful campaign to defeat this threat to our schools. This coalition includes Gov. Gray Davis, the state PTA, the California School Boards Assn., the Assn. of California School Administrators, Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn., California Professional Firefighters and the California Nurses Assn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1993 | MAIA DAVIS
The argument over the school voucher initiative on the state ballot heats up again today with a pro and con forum in Oxnard. Sponsored by the local chapter of Ross Perot's organization United We Stand America, the forum will be held at 2 p.m. at the Fremont Junior High School auditorium, 1130 N. M St. The Rev. Norm Walker, principal of Cochran Baptist School in Simi Valley, will argue in favor of Proposition 174.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California's school voucher initiative is headed for a decisive defeat on Nov. 7, a new Los Angeles Times poll has found. Two-thirds of likely voters who were polled said they plan to vote against Proposition 38, a hotly contested measure that would provide a $4,000 voucher for every California schoolchild to attend a private or a religious school. Twenty-seven percent said they supported it and 7% were undecided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1993
Assemblywoman Paula Boland (R-Granada Hills) endorsed Prop. 174 on Friday, even though the school voucher initiative trails badly in the polls. "Our most affluent families do exercise choice by buying a home in the neighborhood of their choice, or by sending their children to private schools," Boland said in a statement. "However, the poor do not have that kind of choice, and their children are the ones that can least afford a poor education . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1993 | MAIA DAVIS
Although they have held back from taking a stand on the school-voucher initiative, student leaders at Ventura College will hold two forums to inform classmates and the public about the issue. The college's associated student body will hold both forums Wednesday. To accommodate both day and evening students, one session will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the campus quadrangle and the other will run from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the college theater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1993 | ROBERT BARKER
A coalition of parents, community leaders and educators from Huntington Beach, Fountain Valley and Westminster has formed the West Orange County Local Organization Committee to Educate Against the Voucher. The organization is planning to launch a campaign on Sept. 1 to defeat Proposition 174, the Education Vouchers Initiative constitutional amendment, in the November election. The group will form a speakers' bureau, staff a telephone bank and walk precincts as election time nears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1993
The Orange Unified School District will sponsor a community forum Wednesday about the statewide voucher initiative on the ballot Nov. 2. Mike Kilbourn, director of special services for the Orange County Department of Education, will argue against the initiative, which would give parents about $2,600 toward each student's tuition at a private school of their choice. Frank L. Ury, a member of the Saddleback Unified School District Board of Education, will speak for the measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1993
As a teacher, I feel I have to respond to the Valley Commentary column (Aug. 8) by pollster Arnold Steinberg on the school voucher initiative. Although Mr. Steinberg works for the Yes on 174 campaign, he obviously has not read the initiative. Mr. Steinberg states that California tax dollars go to public schools with no accountability--"based solely on number of bodies." In reality, Proposition 174 creates the very system that he rails against. Proposition 174 would give private voucher schools $2,600 for each child enrolled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1993 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As thousands of children began the first day of school Tuesday in Los Angeles and throughout the state, opponents of the controversial school voucher initiative launched a series of political salvos against a November statewide ballot measure they say could destroy public education in California. In Los Angeles, a coalition of 36 civil rights and good-government groups compared backers of Proposition 174, the voucher initiative, to "snake oil peddlers."
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
With California's vouchers-for-all initiative seriously lagging in the polls, advocates and opponents are pondering what a defeat would mean for the future of the national voucher movement. Proposition 38's loss in the Golden State could slow the crusade's momentum, but it is unlikely to squelch the campaign altogether, academics and policy watchers say.
NEWS
October 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Opposition to a hard-fought school voucher initiative on California's November ballot is growing, a poll released Friday shows. Proposition 38 would let parents use $4,000 in taxpayers' money to send their child to a private school. The Field Poll found that 52% of likely voters who were surveyed oppose Proposition 38, while 36% support it and 12% are undecided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000
A Sept. 25 letter writer says, "Everyone will lose should the school voucher initiative pass." Well, I believe everyone will gain (especially students). He maintains parents will discover $4,000 will not pay for private schools. The average cost is $4,200. He also claims public schools will lose revenue. The state pays about $6,500 per student to the public school system. It will be saving $2,500 per student. He maintains private schools will lose autonomy. Wrong again--these schools were teaching long before public schools were in business and will be teaching long after the public school system has destroyed itself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2000 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A statewide initiative that would allow parents to use taxpayer money to send their children to private schools could divert millions of dollars in state money from Ventura County's general services and local public schools. Proposition 38, which will appear on the November ballot, would give parents a $4,000-per-child credit, or voucher, to help pay for private school tuition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2000
Re "It's Not a Good Choice for Our Poor Families," Commentary, July 27: John E. Coons and Stephen D. Sugarman have three fundamental flaws in their argument against Prop. 38, the school voucher initiative. The first is that it would only benefit the rich who can afford private schools. I send two children to private school, and the cost is about $3,300 per student annually. The second is that we would have students from rich families fleeing public schools. Not only have poor families benefited most from existing voucher programs, but assuming that their supposition were true, then Prop.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backers of the November school voucher initiative released a letter Wednesday that they say shows that one of their initiative's most prominent opponents had shopped around its endorsement. The letter to Silicon Valley businessman Timothy C. Draper, the man who launched Proposition 38, was written by Bill Lord-Butcher, a political consultant hired by the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn.
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