Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVoucher Schools
IN THE NEWS

Voucher Schools

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1993
As a teacher, I feel I have to respond to the column by pollster Arnold Steinberg on the school voucher initiative. Although Mr. Steinberg works for the "Yes on 174 campaign," he obviously has not read the initiative. Mr Steinberg states that currently California tax dollars go to public schools with no accountability--"based solely on number of bodies." In reality, Proposition 174 creates the very system that he rails against. Proposition 174 would give private voucher schools $2,600 for each child enrolled (or $2,600 for each body)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 3, 2003 | Walt Gardner, Walt Gardner, who taught for 28 years in the Los Angeles Unified School District, writes frequently on education.
It's been nearly half a century since Milton Friedman first rattled the educational world with his radical proposal to use vouchers to offer choice to parents disaffected with their local public schools. Since then, his ideas have gained increasing acceptance. Supporters of choice are convinced that only the existence of an open educational marketplace can rescue failing schools from the chokehold that vested interests exert, particularly on poor and minority students.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1993
As a teacher, I feel I have to respond to the Valley Commentary column (Aug. 8) by pollster Arnold Steinberg on the school voucher initiative. Although Mr. Steinberg works for the Yes on 174 campaign, he obviously has not read the initiative. Mr. Steinberg states that California tax dollars go to public schools with no accountability--"based solely on number of bodies." In reality, Proposition 174 creates the very system that he rails against. Proposition 174 would give private voucher schools $2,600 for each child enrolled.
OPINION
September 15, 2002
Re "Charter School Money," letters, Sept. 6: In his letter to The Times regarding charter school funding, Alan Bonsteel, a school voucher advocate, lies about charter school funding when he says they receive only 60% of what the public schools receive. He knows better. In fact, many charter schools receive more funding than public schools because they often receive large gifts and grants from private foundations. At a minimum they receive the same amount, dollar for dollar. This is another feeble attempt to make excuses for the underwhelming success of some charter schools.
OPINION
September 15, 2002
Re "Charter School Money," letters, Sept. 6: In his letter to The Times regarding charter school funding, Alan Bonsteel, a school voucher advocate, lies about charter school funding when he says they receive only 60% of what the public schools receive. He knows better. In fact, many charter schools receive more funding than public schools because they often receive large gifts and grants from private foundations. At a minimum they receive the same amount, dollar for dollar. This is another feeble attempt to make excuses for the underwhelming success of some charter schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1993 | ROBERT BARKER
A coalition of parents, community leaders and educators from Huntington Beach, Fountain Valley and Westminster has formed the West Orange County Local Organization Committee to Educate Against the Voucher. The organization is planning to launch a campaign on Sept. 1 to defeat Proposition 174, the Education Vouchers Initiative constitutional amendment, in the November election. The group will form a speakers' bureau, staff a telephone bank and walk precincts as election time nears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000
As the presidents of the teacher associations in the Santa Clarita Valley, representing more than 2,000 teachers, we strongly urge a no vote on Proposition 38, the voucher initiative. Teachers have joined other supporters of public education this fall in a forceful campaign to defeat this threat to our schools. This coalition includes Gov. Gray Davis, the state PTA, the California School Boards Assn., the Assn. of California School Administrators, Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn., California Professional Firefighters and the California Nurses Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1993
The list of prominent individuals who rightly oppose Proposition 174 continues to grow. Proposition 174 is, of course, the statewide initiative on the November ballot that would supply parents with taxpayer-supported vouchers worth about $2,500 a year that they could use at private or parochial schools. Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2000
As a teacher in a public high school as well as an education columnist for L.A. Parent magazine, I am outraged at the presence of Prop. 38 on the November ballot. Prop. 38 is the most extreme and expensive educational proposal in California history. It would hurt local public schools by siphoning away their funding. It would create a system of unregulated voucher schools that are not accountable to the taxpayers supporting them with billions of dollars. Prominent educational researchers have called Prop.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Both sides in the hard-fought battle over school vouchers have launched increasingly strident and misleading advertisements as the vote on Proposition 38 draws closer. The added exposure on the airwaves and in political mailers has done little to clarify the central question of the proposition--whether students should be eligible for $4,000 vouchers of public funds to help them attend private schools.
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether to fund private schools with public money is a question that divides educators just as sharply as U.S. Supreme Court justices, who are considering a Cleveland program that allows children to attend religious schools at government expense. But the divide among educators is not simply between the public sector, which complains that school vouchers sap already struggling neighborhood schools, and the private sector, which stands to benefit from the windfall of government money.
OPINION
February 20, 2002 | RALPH G. NEAS
In the petition he filed last year on behalf of the Bush administration, U.S. Solicitor General Theodore B. Olson urged the U.S. Supreme Court to hear an appeal of a Cleveland school voucher case, which he said involved a program assisting "the parents of students enrolled in failing public schools." Olson was successful--in more ways than one.
NEWS
November 8, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California's universal voucher initiative suffered a decisive defeat late Tuesday, while an effort to make it easier to pass local school construction bond measures clung to a narrow lead. Proposition 38 sought to provide a $4,000 voucher to any student in kindergarten through 12th grade wishing to attend a private school. The hotly debated measure would have created the most sweeping voucher program in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2000
As a teacher in a public high school as well as an education columnist for L.A. Parent magazine, I am outraged at the presence of Prop. 38 on the November ballot. Prop. 38 is the most extreme and expensive educational proposal in California history. It would hurt local public schools by siphoning away their funding. It would create a system of unregulated voucher schools that are not accountable to the taxpayers supporting them with billions of dollars. Prominent educational researchers have called Prop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000
As the presidents of the teacher associations in the Santa Clarita Valley, representing more than 2,000 teachers, we strongly urge a no vote on Proposition 38, the voucher initiative. Teachers have joined other supporters of public education this fall in a forceful campaign to defeat this threat to our schools. This coalition includes Gov. Gray Davis, the state PTA, the California School Boards Assn., the Assn. of California School Administrators, Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn., California Professional Firefighters and the California Nurses Assn.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Both sides in the hard-fought battle over school vouchers have launched increasingly strident and misleading advertisements as the vote on Proposition 38 draws closer. The added exposure on the airwaves and in political mailers has done little to clarify the central question of the proposition--whether students should be eligible for $4,000 vouchers of public funds to help them attend private schools.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
California voters have turned sharply and solidly against Proposition 174, the school voucher initiative, in the last month under the assault of a $6-million advertising campaign by opponents, the Los Angeles Times Poll has found. Two weeks before the Nov. 2 special statewide election, the voucher proposal trailed among registered voters by 59% to 26%. Those who said they were likely to vote opposed the measure by an even greater margin, 66% to 27%.
NEWS
May 3, 2003 | Walt Gardner, Walt Gardner, who taught for 28 years in the Los Angeles Unified School District, writes frequently on education.
It's been nearly half a century since Milton Friedman first rattled the educational world with his radical proposal to use vouchers to offer choice to parents disaffected with their local public schools. Since then, his ideas have gained increasing acceptance. Supporters of choice are convinced that only the existence of an open educational marketplace can rescue failing schools from the chokehold that vested interests exert, particularly on poor and minority students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2000 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In South-Central Los Angeles, which has some of the lowest performing public schools in a district that has careened from crisis to crisis, preschoolers at the private Marcus Garvey School were completing a lesson on the solar system. Down the corridor, another teacher was preparing to introduce her kindergarten class to the periodic table of elements. In buildings painted red, black and green--the colors of black liberation--Garvey's African American students take on calculus in fifth grade.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|