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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1998
With public schools beleaguered by undisciplined students and the highly disciplined religious schools lobbying for vouchers, why not simply give vouchers to the most disruptive students in the public schools? To paraphrase Will Rogers: It would raise the IQ of both institutions. GENE HERD Sherman Oaks
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BUSINESS
July 8, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - A key state Senate committee is backing phone giant AT&T Inc. in a clash with regulators over how to update the state's LifeLine program that provides cut-rate phone service for 1.2 million low-income consumers who now must use old-fashioned land lines. The Senate Energy, Utilities and Communications Committee voted 6 to1 on Monday to support a bill turning LifeLine into a voucher system, providing discounts on phone services and getting rid of most oversight by the California Public Utilities Commission.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
State officials have urged school districts and charter schools to use $66 million in vouchers to buy technology before they expire next year. The warning, issued Friday, pertains to funding remaining from an antitrust settlement with Microsoft Corp. One set of vouchers must be redeemed by April; the other has a deadline in September. Most of the available dollars, $212 million, have been claimed, but substantial resources remain, including more than $10 million for the Los Angeles Unified School District, according to the state's most recent update on unused funds.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Fired up as once-unimaginable spending cuts start to slice the federal budget, Republicans are launching a new phase in their austerity campaign - resurrecting the party's cost-cutting plan to turn Medicare into a voucher-like system for future seniors. Despite public uncertainty Saturday about the $85 billion in so-called sequester cuts, Republicans now believe they have momentum to ask Americans to make tough choices on Medicare, as rising healthcare costs combine with an aging population to form a growing part of future deficits.
OPINION
April 16, 2011
There were winners and losers in the eleventh-hour spending compromise reached by President Obama, Senate Democrats and House Republicans. Among the conspicuous losers was the District of Columbia, which found itself overruled by Congress on two policy matters. First, the deal prohibits the use of public funds for abortion in the district. Second, it reinstates for five years a school voucher plan that leaders of the district opposed. Both actions are unjustifiable intrusions on the authority of the district government and dramatize the second-class status of the nation's capital.
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
JetBlue will give passengers aboard Flight 191 a one-way airfare refund and a voucher for double the amount of their original ticket, the company said online Wednesday. The compensation comes after the pilot of the plane flipped out during the Tuesday flight from New York to Las Vegas and had to be restrained by passengers. "We're extremely grateful to the customers who assisted with onboard security, and to all of the customers for following crew member instructions," the airline posted on its blog and Facebook page.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2011 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Transportation Department fined American Airlines $90,000 for failing to disclose a fee charged to passengers who redeem vouchers they get for voluntarily giving up seats on overbooked flights. An investigation by the federal agency found that American didn't tell passengers they would have to pay a $30 fee to redeem such vouchers by telephone or at airport ticket counters. The airline also didn't disclose that the vouchers could not be redeemed on its website. Airlines are allowed to oversell flights because some passengers usually cancel at the last minute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1997
The letter by Bruce Crawford ("Educators Must Heed the Public," June 8) has a familiar ring. Schools are failing; it's the fault of the teachers union (CTA) and government and vouchers are the solution. Rather than debating school performance (third- and fourth-grade science and math scores are among the highest in the world, so I guess things aren't that bad) or who's to blame, let's look at the fix (vouchers) that Mr. Crawford says is wanted by the electorate. I have a tough time believing California voters would pass a voucher initiative when voucher measures lost by margins of 70% to 30% in 1992 and 1993.
OPINION
September 3, 2000
The debate over school vouchers is wrong at its very core. The argument seems to be whether or not they improve test scores. That is entirely irrelevant. The real issue is whether or not liberty is a basic right or something that must be granted by an authority. I think vouchers are good simply because they put more choice and more liberty into the hands of citizens. And in doing so they support the idea that parents, not the government, are responsible for their families. School vouchers are pro-choice and pro-family.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
The Colorado Supreme Court ruled 4 to 3 that the state's school voucher program is unconstitutional because it strips local school boards of control over education. Colorado's voucher law -- the first in the nation since the U.S. Supreme Court said in 2002 that voucher programs were acceptable -- was never put into effect because of legal challenges. The law would have offered vouchers of $4,500 a year to public school students to help cover their tuition at private or parochial schools.
TRAVEL
February 3, 2013
Passenger safety on cruise safety Regarding "Shipshape?" by Mary Forgione, Jan. 27: Having spent 20 years in the Navy and witnessing multiple fires, collisions and floods with trained crews barely keeping it together, I cannot imagine getting on a ship with 4,000 untrained passengers and expecting a positive outcome in a disaster. The fact that more people didn't die on the Costa Concordia was sheer luck. Mike Benbrook El Cajon   Let's hear it for the good guys!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
When teachers walked off the job in Chicago last month, they were pushing back largely against education priorities pursued by the Obama administration: revamped teacher evaluations, more charter schools and diminished job security for school employees. These issues are also high on the education agenda of Republican challenger Mitt Romney. When it comes to fundamental education issues, in fact, the presidential candidates have similar positions: Both support an overhaul in how teachers are evaluated, calling for students' standardized test scores as one measure of teachers' effectiveness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
State officials have urged school districts and charter schools to use $66 million in vouchers to buy technology before they expire next year. The warning, issued Friday, pertains to funding remaining from an antitrust settlement with Microsoft Corp. One set of vouchers must be redeemed by April; the other has a deadline in September. Most of the available dollars, $212 million, have been claimed, but substantial resources remain, including more than $10 million for the Los Angeles Unified School District, according to the state's most recent update on unused funds.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2012 | By Wailin Wong
CHICAGO - Call it a daily deal, with a twist. Nearly four years after Groupon introduced the concept, smaller rivals that had sought to replicate the Chicago giant's early, explosive success are making tweaks to take advantage of lessons learned - sometimes painfully. "There was a large amount of exuberance for the first couple of years in the industry, and now players - both on the daily deals side and on the merchant end - have gotten very sophisticated about what works and what doesn't," said Jim Moran, co-founder of Yipit, a deals aggregator that also tracks sector data.
OPINION
September 11, 2012
Re "Romney's radical vision," Opinion, Sept. 7 Jonathan Zimmerman states that Mitt Romney's education plan would "allow students to enroll in better schools outside their own district," and that, "for the first time, a major political candidate has suggested that kids in a poor public school district should be allowed to enroll in a wealthier one. " This "radical" vision is already a reality. In California, charter schools are required by law to accept students from anywhere in the state.
OPINION
September 7, 2012 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
As schools around the country open their doors for the fall term, here's a quick end-of-summer quiz: Which major presidential candidate has offered the most radical proposal to change public education? And here's a hint: It's not Barack Obama. Emphasizing high-stakes tests and charter school expansion, Obama has simply continued - or accelerated - the policies handed down by George W. Bush in his signature education reform, No Child Left Behind. By contrast, Mitt Romney has put forth a plan that could completely transform the way Americans organize and fund public schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1998
Alan Bonsteel and Carlos A. Bonilla's case for vouchers based on the lawsuits filed against the Compton Unified School District (Commentary, Nov. 29) is unfair and counterproductive to the efforts of the administrators, teachers, staff, parents and students in this district who are working together to provide a comprehensive quality education for all students. We assure you that the Compton Unified School District has turned the corner in its recovery from years of fiscal and academic mismanagement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2000
Re "The Business Model Won't Fix Schools," Opinion, Sept. 3: Dorothy Shipps is mistaken when she articulates that the "corporate model" will not fix schools. For this experiment to succeed, it must follow business methods. Society would need to pay competitive incomes before it could demand competitive results. No business could survive in private commerce without paying competitive incomes while demanding competitive performance. Of course, those in private commerce who do not perform are dismissed.
OPINION
April 18, 2012
In a few months, the Los Angeles County Housing Authority will begin allowing rent subsidies to be granted to homeless ex-convicts on parole or probation. The move is controversial, with some critics complaining that it rewards criminals, giving them special treatment and moving them to the front of the line for the limited and much-sought-after subsidies. But that's shortsighted. Homeless ex-convicts, including many who committed only minor, nonviolent crimes, don't go away if they don't get housing aid. Although there are risks associated with the new rule, they're risks worth taking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
Homeless convicts on probation or parole are now eligible for government-subsidized housing under a new housing plan approved by Los Angeles County supervisors. The change, which officials said was intended to help reduce chronic homelessness, would give some ex-prisoners priority over thousands of non-offenders who are awaiting government housing assistance, officials said. "We're doing this to try to get homeless off the street," said Emilio Salas, the Los Angeles County housing authority's deputy executive director.
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