Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVoyager
IN THE NEWS

Voyager

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1989
Thank you, Tony Taylor, for your piece on the remarkable journey of Voyager (Op-Ed Page, Aug. 6). As I read the Opinion Section, this was the only item that made me proud to be a member of the human race and a participant or supporter of human activities. All else in the entire section described or was based on hate and discontent, malfeasance and corruption, dishonesty and dishonor, war and unrest, terror and reprisal, the list goes on and on, a paean to man's venality. Meanwhile, 12 years on its way and at the threshold of the limits of our solar system, Voyager continues to perform and to prepare to continue its tremendous journey.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The 1939 sailing of the German ship the St. Louis -- popularized in the book and movie "Voyage of the Damned" -- was a painful precursor to the Holocaust. Now, 75 years later, a November cruise will recall some of that ill-fated trip. The hopes of the 937 Jewish refugees who boarded the St. Louis in Hamburg, Germany, to flee Hitler's Nazi regime were dashed when their plan to land in Cuba and await transport to the U.S. was denied. The U.S. also didn't allow them to enter, and the ship was sent back to Europe.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
September 13, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
You can't spot Voyager 1 as it leaves the solar system's heliosphere, but the National Radio Astronomy Observatory can, and did it just for kicks. Well maybe not for kicks, but scientists were interested in how well their array of 10 radio telescopes, stretching from Hawaii to St. Croix, Virgin Islands, could plot the spacecraft, which is more than 11 billion miles from Earth. Usually, those instruments home in on the faint radio signals from quasars, black holes and the like. They also routinely track NASA's Cassini spacecraft, out around Saturn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - The Kaufmans are again defending their decision to attempt a round-the-world sailing venture with their two young children - a voyage that ended with the family being rescued hundreds of miles at sea when 1-year-old Lyra became sick. In Twitter messages Thursday, Charlotte Kaufman and her husband, Eric, said they "have been happy with the maritime life we have been able to share with our daughters.  ... Children have been sailing on boats for a long time and the modern cruising family dates back several decades.
SCIENCE
September 12, 2013 | By Monte Morin, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
NASA confirmed Thursday that after 36 years of space travel and months of heated debate among scientists, Voyager 1 has indeed left our solar system and had entered interstellar space more than a year ago. "Voyager has boldly gone where no probe has gone before, marking one of the most significant technological achievements in the annals of the history of science," said John Grunsfeld, NASA's associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By David Ng
Voyager 1, the NASA space probe that left Earth in 1977, has officially exited the solar system and is now the first manmade object to enter interstellar space. And it took with it classical music. NASA on Thursday made the big announcement that the probe, which is 12 billion miles from the sun, probably left the solar system a year ago. Among the objects Voyager 1 is carrying as it travels toward deep space is the so-called "Golden Record" -- a 12-inch gold-plated copper disk that contains greetings, images, sounds and recordings of music intended to be heard by extraterrestrial intelligence.  RELATED: Voyager 1 has left the solar system The music selection on Voyager skews noticeably classical, with the inclusion of seven classical selections out of a total of 27 tracks.
SCIENCE
September 12, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Now that Voyager 1 has safely reached interstellar space, scientists who have spent decades working on the mission at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory can finally breathe a sigh of relief. "We've had 30 years of fear that something could go wrong," said Torrence Johnson, a senior research scientist at JPL who worked on Voyager camera equipment. "There were white-knuckle moments. " Those fears are gone now. The Voyager 1 probe, first conceived in 1972 and launched in 1977, has exited the sun's heliosphere , considered by many to be the informal boundary of the solar system.
SCIENCE
March 20, 2013 | By Monte Morin
It's rare for scientists to include personal sentiments in peer-reviewed journals. For the most part, scientific studies are dry, clinical affairs. Yet there are moments when a paper will end on a poignant or sentimental note, and it usually involves the passing of one of the authors. Such was the case in a study appearing online Wednesday in Geophysical Research Letters about Voyager 1 nearing the threshold of interstellar space. While study authors interpreted data taken from Voyager's sensors to mean that the spacecraft had, on Aug. 25, 2012, "exited the main solar modulation region" and entered "the local interstellar medium," NASA officials responded quickly on Wednesday by saying they don't believe the probe has yet escaped our solar system.
OPINION
February 18, 2014 | By Edward C. Stone
The Voyager 1 spacecraft is the first human-made object to venture into interstellar space. Even if defined only by distance, the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory twin Voyagers are America's greatest space adventure. They've been flying successfully for more than 36 years and are billions of miles from home. What isn't widely known is that they almost never made it out there. The first proposed mission in the late 1960s was for four spacecraft to take advantage of a rare alignment of the four outer planets of the solar system; Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune would all be on the same side of the sun. However, in December 1971, NASA decided it couldn't afford the $1-billion price tag for a 12-year "grand tour" mission with four spacecraft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1986
In a sidebar to the coverage of the epic flight of Voyager (Dec. 24), you identified the builders of the second and third aircraft to circle the earth. Your readers might like to know that the first aircraft to circumnavigate the globe were a pair of Douglas World Cruisers, designed and built in Santa Monica. The average flying speed of that journey was 78 m.p.h., just 37 m.p.h. slower than Voyager's 115 m.p.h. NISSEN DAVIS Rancho Palos Verdes
TRAVEL
April 6, 2014 | By Jen Leo
Here's the latest trip-planning website that can help you craft your own guidebook. Name: http://www.BonVoyaging.com What it does: It's a Web bookmarking tool that lets you collect and store your travel itineraries, complete with maps and the ability to download and share. Cost: Free What's hot: This website has two things that will keep me coming back: its beautiful, design-friendly layout, and the ability to print out a PDF of my itinerary. I love being able to access my travel plans from my smartphone or tablet, as well as sharing with my friends on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, but I'm still a paper girl at heart.
SCIENCE
March 26, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
It began with a cryptic announcement of a press conference in Brazil where “an international team of astronomers” would announce “a surprise discovery in the outer solar system.” If that sounds intriguing to you, you're not alone. In the 27-odd hours between the time the heads-up reached folks' email in-boxes and the press conference (which kicks off at 3 p.m. local time (11 a.m. PDT) at Brazil's  National Observatory in Rio de Janeiro), clever people took to Twitter to make their best guesses about what this surprise discovery might be. The predictions make reference to the ill-fated Comet ISON, Neil deGrasse Tyson's reboot of “Cosmos,” the Voyager spacecraft and even the 1990s sitcom “Friends.” The European Southern Observatory tweeted Wedned say morning that “Some of your #ESOrumors are really funny.
OPINION
February 18, 2014 | By Edward C. Stone
The Voyager 1 spacecraft is the first human-made object to venture into interstellar space. Even if defined only by distance, the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory twin Voyagers are America's greatest space adventure. They've been flying successfully for more than 36 years and are billions of miles from home. What isn't widely known is that they almost never made it out there. The first proposed mission in the late 1960s was for four spacecraft to take advantage of a rare alignment of the four outer planets of the solar system; Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune would all be on the same side of the sun. However, in December 1971, NASA decided it couldn't afford the $1-billion price tag for a 12-year "grand tour" mission with four spacecraft.
OPINION
December 25, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Today is the day Christians around the world celebrate one of the central miracles of the New Testament: the birth of God's son on Earth. Since then, the "miracle" bar has been lowered and the label has been secularized, attached by the media to all manner of unexpected and wondrous feats - from rescue workers finding a baby alive in the rubble five days after the devastating Haitian earthquake in 2010 to the U.S. Olympic hockey team's stunning upset...
TRAVEL
December 22, 2013 | By Catherine Watson
The trans-Atlantic eclipse voyage was organized by Betchart Expeditions ([800] 252-4910, http://www.betchartexpeditions.com ), a California-based company specializing in science-oriented travel. It offers about two dozen science-themed trips a year to destinations around the globe. I'd traveled with Betchart once before, on a trip to Antarctica 20 years earlier, and I trusted the company, the intellectually oriented clientele its trips attract and the experts it chooses for daily lectures.
NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Travel through time to Alaska's Gold Rush era on a coastal steamer where  crew members, dressed in period costumes, describe events of 1898. A diverse cast of characters, from cannery workers to shipping magnates, talks about the 19th century free-for-all on the steamship cruise between Juneau and Ketchikan. Seattle-based Un-Cruise Adventures hosts Alaska's Golden History cruises, which blend the state's dramatic landscape of glaciers and mountains with living history skits and presentations.
OPINION
October 13, 2013 | By Joyce Appleby
The day in 1492 when Columbus ran into a cluster of islands blocking his way to India is celebrated throughout Latin America and in Spain. It is now fixed in the United States as the second Monday in October, and Americans too have long commemorated the event, both embracing and vilifying the explorer. Irish and Italian immigrants proudly pointed to Columbus' Roman Catholic religion to fight the prejudice they experienced in their adopted country, and in 1882, they founded the Knights of Columbus, now the world's largest Catholic service organization.
OPINION
September 14, 2013
Re "NASA confirms Voyager milestone," Sept. 13 Iread of Voyager 1 leaving our solar system with more excitement, pride and soaring emotion than I had expected. I'm a retired teacher, and I remember the excitement that Voyager 1 stirred when it was launched in 1977. It was proof of American ingenuity, a measure of our national resolve to be first in everything we tried to accomplish. My students' imaginations were fired up by America's achievements in space. In fact, two of them went on to earn seats on space shuttle missions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|