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Voyager 1 Spacecraft

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NEWS
June 7, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The intrepid Voyager 1 spacecraft has sent back its final series of photos from space, capturing the planets of the solar system just as they were intended to be--insignificant points of light in a cold, dark universe. "This is where we live," astronomer Carl Sagan said as he pointed at one small speck of light. "On a blue dot."
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SCIENCE
June 15, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Thirty-five years after NASA's Voyager 1 was launched, the spacecraft is on the edge of the solar system and verging on entering interstellar space, the agency said Friday. The craft is now 11.1 billion miles from Earth, a distance that means radio signals from the craft require 16 hours and 38 minutes to reach the antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network. "It is very exciting. We are approaching the solar system's frontier," said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist at Caltech. Three instruments onboard are providing key data about the craft's passage into interstellar space.
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NEWS
February 28, 1993 | PETER H. KING
Little about the low-slung, red brick building at 460 Sierra Madre Villa Ave. suggests its purpose. The structure fronts a block of 1950s-vintage, ranch-style homes, with RVs parked in driveways and magnolias planted along the sidewalk. Down the street, there's a Christian preschool; up the street, a branch library. The front door opens to a maze of cubicles--the ubiquitous "work stations" of the modern American office. It is hardly a beehive.
NEWS
February 18, 1998 | Associated Press
A spacecraft bearing sounds of a wild dog, a mother's kiss and a tractor passed a point 6.5 billion miles from Earth on Tuesday to become the most distant object made by humans. Voyager 1--so far away after more than 20 years in space that its signals take more than 9 1/2 hours to reach Earth--surpassed the distance of the older Pioneer 10 spacecraft at 2:10 p.m. Voyager 1 and Pioneer 10 are headed away from the sun in nearly opposite directions.
NEWS
February 18, 1998 | Associated Press
A spacecraft bearing sounds of a wild dog, a mother's kiss and a tractor passed a point 6.5 billion miles from Earth on Tuesday to become the most distant object made by humans. Voyager 1--so far away after more than 20 years in space that its signals take more than 9 1/2 hours to reach Earth--surpassed the distance of the older Pioneer 10 spacecraft at 2:10 p.m. Voyager 1 and Pioneer 10 are headed away from the sun in nearly opposite directions.
SCIENCE
June 15, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Thirty-five years after NASA's Voyager 1 was launched, the spacecraft is on the edge of the solar system and verging on entering interstellar space, the agency said Friday. The craft is now 11.1 billion miles from Earth, a distance that means radio signals from the craft require 16 hours and 38 minutes to reach the antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network. "It is very exciting. We are approaching the solar system's frontier," said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist at Caltech. Three instruments onboard are providing key data about the craft's passage into interstellar space.
SCIENCE
December 3, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Voyager 1, the spacecraft famous for beaming back striking photos of Jupiter, Saturn and their moons more than 30 years ago, has made still another surprising discovery: the existence of an unexpected zone at the very edge of the solar system. It had been thought that the NASA probe was already passing through the outermost section of the solar system on its way toward the heliopause - the boundary where the solar wind ends and interstellar space begins. For that reason, the existence of yet another district at our cosmic neighborhood's edge was completely unexpected, said Stamatios Krimigis, a solar physicist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., and leader of the team that operates Voyager's low-energy charged particle instrument.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1986 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Clouds of methane on Saturn's moon Titan really aren't clouds at all, but a steady rain of natural gas droplets, NASA and French researchers say. Based on a new analysis of the Voyager 1 spacecraft's November, 1979, flight past Titan, "We find that the methane clouds are composed of such large particles that they would be considered rain, not clouds, on Earth," they said at last week's American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.
SCIENCE
March 20, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Ladies and gentlemen, the Voyager 1 spacecraft has left the solar system - or has it? Scientists are continuing to debate whether the lonesome craft has finally escaped the solar system after 35 years of travel or has simply entered a previously unknown region of solar influence. On Wednesday, a study published in Geophysical Research Letters , a journal of the American Geophysical Union, suggests that the Voyager spacecraft exited the heliosphere - that region of space dominated by solar winds and long considered to be the edge of the solar system - on Aug. 25, 2012.
SCIENCE
August 15, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Voyager 1, where are you? At a distance of more than 11 billion miles from Earth, there is little question that Voyager has traveled farther in space than any other man-made object. However, the issue of whether or not the spacecraft has left the solar system continues to inspire heated debate among scientists. NASA insists the probe still remains within the heliosphere, that region of space that falls within the influence of our sun's magnetic field. In fact, NASA says the probe is now traveling to the very edge of the heliosphere and has encountered a mysterious boundary area called the depletion region.
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | PETER H. KING
Little about the low-slung, red brick building at 460 Sierra Madre Villa Ave. suggests its purpose. The structure fronts a block of 1950s-vintage, ranch-style homes, with RVs parked in driveways and magnolias planted along the sidewalk. Down the street, there's a Christian preschool; up the street, a branch library. The front door opens to a maze of cubicles--the ubiquitous "work stations" of the modern American office. It is hardly a beehive.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The intrepid Voyager 1 spacecraft has sent back its final series of photos from space, capturing the planets of the solar system just as they were intended to be--insignificant points of light in a cold, dark universe. "This is where we live," astronomer Carl Sagan said as he pointed at one small speck of light. "On a blue dot."
OPINION
February 18, 2014 | By Edward C. Stone
The Voyager 1 spacecraft is the first human-made object to venture into interstellar space. Even if defined only by distance, the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory twin Voyagers are America's greatest space adventure. They've been flying successfully for more than 36 years and are billions of miles from home. What isn't widely known is that they almost never made it out there. The first proposed mission in the late 1960s was for four spacecraft to take advantage of a rare alignment of the four outer planets of the solar system; Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune would all be on the same side of the sun. However, in December 1971, NASA decided it couldn't afford the $1-billion price tag for a 12-year "grand tour" mission with four spacecraft.
OPINION
December 25, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Today is the day Christians around the world celebrate one of the central miracles of the New Testament: the birth of God's son on Earth. Since then, the "miracle" bar has been lowered and the label has been secularized, attached by the media to all manner of unexpected and wondrous feats - from rescue workers finding a baby alive in the rubble five days after the devastating Haitian earthquake in 2010 to the U.S. Olympic hockey team's stunning upset...
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