Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVoyager 2 Spacecraft
IN THE NEWS

Voyager 2 Spacecraft

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1987
Scientists are fine-tuning computer programs and tricky observational techniques for the Voyager 2 spacecraft's history-making 1989 encounter with the far-off planet Neptune. Launched Aug. 20, 1977, Voyager 2 is one of the most successful spacecraft ever built, passing by and studying Jupiter in 1979, Saturn in 1981 and distant Uranus in January, 1986. "We flew by Uranus in such a way that it would deflect us to Neptune," said Voyager project manager Norman Haynes. "We arrive at Neptune on Aug.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | PETER H. KING
Little about the low-slung, red brick building at 460 Sierra Madre Villa Ave. suggests its purpose. The structure fronts a block of 1950s-vintage, ranch-style homes, with RVs parked in driveways and magnolias planted along the sidewalk. Down the street, there's a Christian preschool; up the street, a branch library. The front door opens to a maze of cubicles--the ubiquitous "work stations" of the modern American office. It is hardly a beehive.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Scientists studying images from the Voyager flyby of Neptune have been able to answer one of the most important questions left over from the August encounter: the ice volcanoes on the moon of Triton are still active. "We caught one in the act," said Ellis Miner, deputy Voyager project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Triton thus becomes only the third object in the solar system known to have active volcanoes, along with the Earth and Jupiter's moon Io.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Scientists studying images sent back by the the Voyager spacecraft last August have discovered the fastest winds in the solar system whipping around Neptune at about 1,500 miles an hour. The scientists found the unexpected winds after they plotted fleecy white clouds shown in a series of Voyager photographs. The clouds are being pushed at nearly supersonic speed on Neptune by winds that are similar to the jet stream on Earth, Caltech physicist Edward Stone said.
NEWS
August 4, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
The Voyager 2 spacecraft has discovered three more moons orbiting Neptune although the small craft is still 21 million miles and three weeks away from its close encounter with the distant planet, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced Thursday. That brings to six the total number of moons known to be circling Neptune, including one discovered by Voyager last month. All of the newly discovered moons are small and in orbits close to the giant, gaseous planet.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
There will be something for everybody in the nighttime sky during the next few weeks, including a meteor shower this weekend and a total eclipse of the moon next week. August will also bring the astronomical highlight of the year when the aging Voyager 2 spacecraft zips over the cloud tops of Neptune on the evening of Aug. 24.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists studying photographs relayed by the Voyager 2 spacecraft have discovered huge icy boulders in a mysterious ring around Neptune, possibly providing a clue as to why the planet's outermost ring is so bizarre. The icy "moonlets" measure up to about 10 miles in diameter, far larger than the dust-like particles believed to make up the rest of the ring. More importantly, they were found in an area that is much brighter and wider than the rest of the ring.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
The Grand Tour is almost over. The venerable Voyager 2 spacecraft is sailing through the back yard of the solar system at more than 42,000 m.p.h., closing in on the last encounter of the most incredible journey of all. The automated craft is plunging through an area nearly 3 billion miles away where no visitor from Earth has ever been before, aiming toward a spectacular flight over the cloud tops of Neptune at 9 p.m. on Aug. 24.
NEWS
August 21, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists have discovered a "Rogue's Gallery" of storm centers in the atmosphere of Neptune, including hurricane-like storms that are so intense they defy explanation. Packing winds of up to 400 m.p.h., the fierce storms appear as dark spots on photos that are being sent back to Earth from the Voyager spacecraft, which is zipping toward a close encounter with the distant planet Thursday night.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
An obscure little moon that is almost invisible to the most powerful telescopes on Earth appeared in danger of stealing Neptune's thunder as the Voyager spacecraft raced toward tonight's historic encounter with the distant planet. Images of Neptune's oddball moon, Triton, indicate part of the satellite's surface may be light blue in color, while much of the rest of it is pink.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Scientists studying images from the Voyager flyby of Neptune have been able to answer one of the most important questions left over from the August encounter: the ice volcanoes on the moon of Triton are still active. "We caught one in the act," said Ellis Miner, deputy Voyager project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Triton thus becomes only the third object in the solar system known to have active volcanoes, along with the Earth and Jupiter's moon Io.
NEWS
August 30, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists bade an emotional farewell to the Voyager on Tuesday as the intrepid spacecraft completed its grand tour of the outer planets and headed out in search of new worlds. "It's been a very special decade in human history," imaging team leader Bradford Smith of the University of Arizona said as scientists closed out their work at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. No other spacecraft has ever visited four planets.
NEWS
August 30, 1989 | LEE DYE
Neptune, which is blue in color because of methane in its atmosphere, has a dynamic atmosphere with winds up to 700 m.p.h. and a storm center as large as the entire Earth. That was completely unexpected. The planet has a magnetic field, but it is tipped 50 degrees from Neptune's rotational axis. No one is sure why. Neptune's magnetic field indicates that the planet's day is 16.3 hours long, about two hours shorter than scientists had thought.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Voyager 2 probably will be asked to take one last photo before it disappears into the darkness of space to wander among distant stars--a "snapshot" of the sun and its family. Sources in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said Monday they expect officials to approve a plan to order the Voyager to glance over its shoulder sometime next spring for one last look at home.
NEWS
August 28, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Admitting it is a "crazy idea," scientists analyzing photographs from the Voyager spacecraft said Sunday that they believe they have discovered active ice volcanoes on Neptune's moon, Triton. The bizarre volcanoes appear to have blasted frozen nitrogen crystals into the air, possibly as much as 15 miles above the frigid, tortured surface of Triton. The darkened crystals were then apparently carried downwind before falling back to the surface and forming a black scar.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists studying photographs relayed by the Voyager 2 spacecraft have discovered huge icy boulders in a mysterious ring around Neptune, possibly providing a clue as to why the planet's outermost ring is so bizarre. The icy "moonlets" measure up to about 10 miles in diameter, far larger than the dust-like particles believed to make up the rest of the ring. More importantly, they were found in an area that is much brighter and wider than the rest of the ring.
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Neptune embraced Voyager Thursday night, using its gravity to boost the tiny spacecraft's speed up to 60,000 m.p.h. in the grand climax of a spectacular expedition through the outer solar system. After traveling 4.4 billion miles over the past 12 years, Voyager arrived "within 20 miles of the point we were aiming at," said Norm Haynes, Voyager project manager. "That's not bad shooting," he said, especially considering the fact that Neptune is 2.7 billion miles away.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Exhausted but ecstatic scientists devoured their latest treasures from space Friday as the Voyager spacecraft provided a spectacular climax to a 12-year journey that will not be matched for decades, and possibly centuries. Researchers pored over photos that unmasked Neptune's mysterious moon, Triton--a cold world of ice-spewing volcanoes, moonquakes and a tortured past--the first of an expected three days' worth of historic data and images of the moon and its mother planet.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | LINDA MONROE and ASHLEY DUNN, Times Staff Writers
It's hard to say whether it was adrenaline or caffeine that got the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Voyager 2 imaging team through the wee hours of Friday morning. Gulps of coffee seemed to come as often as gasps of wonder and triumph as Voyager sent back 23 pictures of the Neptunian moon Triton. This was the night they had been waiting for.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|