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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | LAURENCE VITTES
Imagine listening to a compact disc and simultaneously having access to a computerized, user-friendly, verbal and visual encyclopedia about the music. For example, you're listening to Beethoven's String Quartet No. 14 and the computer program--in a chapter about musical pitches--informs you: "Musicians eventually became frustrated. Picture the situation: Wonderful tunes were invented, became Top 40 chants, but suddenly were forgotten because someone's memory lapsed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1992 | SCOTT HETTRICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Secret agent James Bond, defender of the free world, has lost a recent skirmish involving free speech, according to a notice inside the Voyager Co.'s new laser-disc releases of the first three 007 adventures, "Dr. No," "From Russia With Love" and "Goldfinger." The note claims that an attempt has been made to "censor" filmmakers and historians who discussed production techniques and Bond personalities on a secondary audio track made for the original laser-disc releases last year.
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NEWS
July 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jeana Yeager, who made history in the non-stop round-the-world flight of the Voyager in 1986, escaped injury Sunday when an experimental plane she was co-piloting lost power and crashed on landing. Elko County Sheriff's Deputy James Neff said the 38-year-old Yeager of Nipomo, Calif., and the plane's pilot, Shirland K. Dickey, 48, of Chandler, Ariz., walked away from the craft.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | LAURENCE VITTES
Imagine listening to a compact disc and simultaneously having access to a computerized, user-friendly, verbal and visual encyclopedia about the music. For example, you're listening to Beethoven's String Quartet No. 14 and the computer program--in a chapter about musical pitches--informs you: "Musicians eventually became frustrated. Picture the situation: Wonderful tunes were invented, became Top 40 chants, but suddenly were forgotten because someone's memory lapsed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1992 | SCOTT HETTRICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Secret agent James Bond, defender of the free world, has lost a recent skirmish involving free speech, according to a notice inside the Voyager Co.'s new laser-disc releases of the first three 007 adventures, "Dr. No," "From Russia With Love" and "Goldfinger." The note claims that an attempt has been made to "censor" filmmakers and historians who discussed production techniques and Bond personalities on a secondary audio track made for the original laser-disc releases last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | BARBARA SALTZMAN
If ever a film cried out for showing in letter-box format, it's "West Side Story." If you last saw the 1961 Academy Award-winning film on tape, or worse, cut up for viewing on broadcast TV, you have a treat in store. This is one musical that demands to be seen without pans and scans, and the letter-box versions (banded on top and bottom to approximate the big-screen experience) in Criterion's CAV and CLV formats provide that.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Apple Accused of Censorship by Software Maker: New York-based Voyager Co. claims Apple Computer Inc. is dropping one of its CD-ROM programs from computers sold to schools because Voyager would not eliminate the program's discussion of homosexuality, birth control and abortion. "They can say that it's business, but they are bowing to a special interest. To me that's censorship," Voyager spokesman Braden Michaels said. Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple bristled at the accusation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1988 | BARBARA SALTZMAN
"Scaramouche" (Criterion Collection, full-feature CAV format, 105 minutes, 1952, color, $79.95, distributed by Voyager Co.; (213) 474-0032). Even though this swashbuckler is not in the same league as other Criterion film classics, it's given the full, lavish laser disc treatment. Included are interviews with actor Stewart Granger, who plays the title role, and director George Sidney.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1992
Image Entertainment Inc., a Chatsworth distributor of movies and other programming on laser disc, said it has signed a multi-year agreement to distribute certain of Voyager Co.'s laser-disc programs. Under the pact, Image obtains exclusive distribution rights for Voyager's Criterion Collection line of laser-disc programs, which include the movies "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" and "Lawrence of Arabia."
BUSINESS
July 12, 1994 | AMY HARMON
New media: Two Time Warner subsidiaries, Home Box Office and Warner Music Group, have invested about $5 million to form a multimedia company called Inscape, to be headed by developer Michael Nash and based in West Los Angeles. The venture reflects the growing realization among big media companies looking to get into the interactive business that good talent is hard to find.
NEWS
July 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jeana Yeager, who made history in the non-stop round-the-world flight of the Voyager in 1986, escaped injury Sunday when an experimental plane she was co-piloting lost power and crashed on landing. Elko County Sheriff's Deputy James Neff said the 38-year-old Yeager of Nipomo, Calif., and the plane's pilot, Shirland K. Dickey, 48, of Chandler, Ariz., walked away from the craft.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | BARBARA SALTZMAN
If ever a film cried out for showing in letter-box format, it's "West Side Story." If you last saw the 1961 Academy Award-winning film on tape, or worse, cut up for viewing on broadcast TV, you have a treat in store. This is one musical that demands to be seen without pans and scans, and the letter-box versions (banded on top and bottom to approximate the big-screen experience) in Criterion's CAV and CLV formats provide that.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1988 | BARBARA SALTZMAN
"King Kong" (Criterion, The Voyager Co., 2139 Manning Ave., Los Angeles, 90025, 1-800-446-2001, $74.95). This is the most complete, pristine copy of the '33 sci-fi classic yet. The bulk of the print comes from a 35-millimeter negative from the Library of Congress. Scenes censored in 1938 were restored from 16-millimeter prints.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1995
I am grateful for the story on my Classic Arts Showcase ("A Satellite to Save the Arts," by Barbara Isenberg, July 16). Credit is also due to the record companies who supply our programming: BMG Classics, Criterion Collection/The Voyager Co., Sony Classical, Deutsche Grammophon, EMI/Angel, Kultur, Lumivision, PolyGram, Teldec/Elektra International Classics, Video Artists International and independent producers. In addition, the unions related to the creation of the programming--AFTRA, AFM, IATSE, WGA and SAG--granted Classic Arts Showcase a waiver to add two minutes to the three minutes of promotion rights passed on to us from the recording companies.
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