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Voyeurism

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NATIONAL
May 16, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- The case against Steven Powell is over: A jury has convicted him of 14 counts of voyeurism stemming from photos of two young neighbor girls found in his bedroom. But police appear no closer to zeroing in on the bigger question of what happened to his daughter-in-law, Susan Cox Powell, who was captured in various stages of undress in the furtively collected photos. The six-man, six-woman jury deliberated less than a day before convicting the 62-year-old Puyallup, Wash., resident Wednesday of all 14 charges against him, a case that could bring a maximum of five years in prison on each count.
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NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt
Cardiff Giant, the hospitality group behind The Hudson and The Churchill, has been very busy of late. The Daily Dish just got word that the group is set to take over the former Voyeur Nightclub  space at 7969 Santa Monica Ave. and will renovate and re-open it as a new nightclub concept in January of 2013. This comes after rumors circulated on the web that NYC's The Box was going to take the space. In addition Cardiff Giant has announced plans to open an as-of-yet un-named restaurant in downtown L.A. in the old Heinz loading dock at 712 S. Santa Fe after the New Year.
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NATIONAL
September 22, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Calling video voyeurism the new frontier of stalking, the House approved legislation to make it a crime to secretly photograph or videotape people. Under the legislation passed by voice vote, video voyeurism on federal land would be punishable by a fine of not more than $100,000, imprisonment for up to one year, or both. Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. (R-Wis.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- Steven Powell, the father-in-law of missing Utah mother Susan Powell, was sentenced Friday to 30 months in prison for secretly photographing two young neighbor children in various stages of undress through the window of their home. The sentencing in Tacoma, Wash., concluded a bizarre family epic of murder, lust and mystery that spanned three generations and two states. But Pierce County District Court Judge Ronald E. Culpepper made it clear he was sentencing Powell on the voyeurism charges before the court -- not for what he may have known about his daughter-in-law's disappearance.
NEWS
April 7, 1999 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assemblyman Dick Ackerman (R-Fullerton) is putting forward a simple proposition: Shouldn't it be illegal for men to peer up a woman's skirt or down her blouse--with a hidden video camera? Ackerman is asking his colleagues to outlaw what police say is an increasing and potentially lucrative activity: surreptitious "upskirting" and "down-blousing" of women.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis on Thursday signed into law a bill making it a crime for voyeurs to use hidden video cameras to look up the skirts of unsuspecting women. The law, sponsored by Assemblyman Dick Ackerman (R-Fullerton), prohibits secretly videotaping or photographing another person under or through their clothing with the intent of personal gratification.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | ROSE APODACA JONES
It can be so frustrating. You throw a fabulous party with a thoughtful theme, and does anybody bother to dress for it? No matter. At least patrons at the premiere of Alien Dance Spa at Irvine's Metropolis nightclub Saturday got in the mood once they were there. The invitation promised a sensual and erotic sensory experience (the E and S words were repeated several times), and the club delivered both with 800 candles, house music, roaming musicians and dancers bedecked in wild regalia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Underground cinema imp Harmony Korine's latest freaky dispatch from America's rancid subculture is "Trash Humpers," a gnarly bleat about a tightly knit gang of elderly street denizens, whose recorded antics — vandalism, peeping, dragging baby dolls around on bikes and, yes, violating garbage bins — are presented as a "found" videotaped artifact of secret misfithood. (The cast is Korine and company in extra-wrinkly old-age makeup.) Stripped of the forced sentimentality that jarred as much as the outré imagery did in his previous films (which include "Gummo" and "Julien Donkey-Boy")
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2010 | By Susan Kandel
Gleaming white tiles; pounding jets of water; a naked woman; a shadowy figure on the other side of the plastic curtain; is there anyone out there who doesn't know what happens next? If not the most famous scene in the history of the cinema, the shower sequence in "Psycho," Alfred Hitchcock's black-and-white masterwork of 1960, is certainly the most imitated and parodied. Though Norman Bates dispatches with the hapless Marion Crane in less than a minute, shooting the scene took seven days, 78 camera setups, the eleventh-hour addition of Bernard Herrmann's shrieking score for strings, several yards of flesh-colored moleskin, an actress, a stand-in and a body double -- the last of which is the putative subject of Robert Graysmith's ultimately baffling "The Girl in Alfred Hitchcock's Shower."
MAGAZINE
November 18, 2007 | Christopher Hawthorne, Christopher Hawthorne is the architecture critic for The Times. Contact him at christopher.hawthorne@latimes.com.
Some pieces of architecture are born symbolic, some achieve symbolism, and others--well, others wind up on the side of a highway in the middle of Los Angeles. That was the modified Shakespearean phrase that came to mind as I watched the unfolding drama surrounding the so-called Freeway House.
NATIONAL
May 16, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- The case against Steven Powell is over: A jury has convicted him of 14 counts of voyeurism stemming from photos of two young neighbor girls found in his bedroom. But police appear no closer to zeroing in on the bigger question of what happened to his daughter-in-law, Susan Cox Powell, who was captured in various stages of undress in the furtively collected photos. The six-man, six-woman jury deliberated less than a day before convicting the 62-year-old Puyallup, Wash., resident Wednesday of all 14 charges against him, a case that could bring a maximum of five years in prison on each count.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- The prosecution drew a tighter knot around Steven Powell on Tuesday when a judge in Tacoma, Wash., upheld the search warrant that turned up about 2,000 explicit photos of women and young girls - some of them depicting his missing daughter-in-law, Susan Cox Powell, with whom he was said to be obsessed. Pierce County Superior Court Judge Ronald Culpepper's decision clears the way for Powell to go on trial next month on voyeurism and child pornography charges, and for the photos to be used as evidence.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Underground cinema imp Harmony Korine's latest freaky dispatch from America's rancid subculture is "Trash Humpers," a gnarly bleat about a tightly knit gang of elderly street denizens, whose recorded antics — vandalism, peeping, dragging baby dolls around on bikes and, yes, violating garbage bins — are presented as a "found" videotaped artifact of secret misfithood. (The cast is Korine and company in extra-wrinkly old-age makeup.) Stripped of the forced sentimentality that jarred as much as the outré imagery did in his previous films (which include "Gummo" and "Julien Donkey-Boy")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2010 | Steve Lopez
Well, it just seemed to me that somebody had to go check out the Voyeur club in West Hollywood. Why? To assess the damage that may have been done to the Young Eagles wing of the GOP. So I asked West Hollywood City Councilman Jeffrey Prang to accompany me to his town's latest sensation, where the themes are said to include lesbian bondage and sadomasochism. Naturally, the club has been even hotter since the news that a group of up-and-coming GOP donors had dropped by Voyeur Jan. 31 after a meeting.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas
The Republican National Committee is investigating the expenditure of nearly $2,000 in party funds at a racy West Hollywood nightclub, a party spokesman said Monday. RNC spokesman Doug Heye acknowledged that the party had reimbursed Erik Brown, president of a Southern California firm that has provided direct mail services to political campaigns, for a Jan. 31 outing at Voyeur West Hollywood. The club, inspired by the film "Eyes Wide Shut," is intended to be "risque and provocative" and "a combination of intimidation and sexuality," one of its partners, David Koral, told The Times in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2010 | By Susan Kandel
Gleaming white tiles; pounding jets of water; a naked woman; a shadowy figure on the other side of the plastic curtain; is there anyone out there who doesn't know what happens next? If not the most famous scene in the history of the cinema, the shower sequence in "Psycho," Alfred Hitchcock's black-and-white masterwork of 1960, is certainly the most imitated and parodied. Though Norman Bates dispatches with the hapless Marion Crane in less than a minute, shooting the scene took seven days, 78 camera setups, the eleventh-hour addition of Bernard Herrmann's shrieking score for strings, several yards of flesh-colored moleskin, an actress, a stand-in and a body double -- the last of which is the putative subject of Robert Graysmith's ultimately baffling "The Girl in Alfred Hitchcock's Shower."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2000 | DIANE WERTS, NEWSDAY
"We like to watch," declares the cover of Time magazine about America's sudden obsession with voyeuristic series such as "Survivor," "The 1900 House" and "The Real World." But that isn't the true lure in these shows or other "reality" events such as the Miss America pageant or "Who Wants to Marry a Multi-Millionaire?" It isn't voyeurism, feminine pulchritude or wedding envy that holds us rapt. Not even close. We like to judge. That's what we like, big time. Nobody watches these shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
On "Ricki Lake" the other day, a lesbian brought down the house when disclosing to her coarse, wide-bodied girlfriend that she was pregnant. The girlfriend's jaw dropped. "I know it ain't mine," she said, causing a second eruption in the studio. Ricki Lake laughed. The rowdy audience laughed. The pregnant woman laughed, the fetus in her belly becoming a punch line without anyone asking what would become of it. If this was on the level, was she planning to have the child?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2009 | Scott T. Sterling
Night-life entrepreneurs routinely fixate on the details of their new clubs -- the lighting, the furniture, the vibe. But for the team behind new West Hollywood nightspot Voyeur, the details became something of an obsession. Take, for example, the uniforms worn by the club's cocktail waitresses. "We thought it would be cool to have them all dressed like Natalie Portman from the movie 'Closer,' " said David Koral, a partner behind Voyeur. Dressed, meaning mostly undressed. Not that bare skin would be anything new at the Voyeur space, 7969 Santa Monica Blvd.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2009 | Geraldine Baum
Two couples, both from out of town, linger on the same park bench, gazing up at gauzy curtains in the windows of a 19-story hotel. They don't know each other, but there they are, on a sunny Labor Day afternoon, hoping to steal a glimpse of, well, for lack of a more delicate way to put it, naked people. Voyeurism became New York's hot attraction this summer after guests were photographed in the buff prancing about, even having sex, in front of floor-to-ceiling windows at the Standard Hotel in the hip Meatpacking District.
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