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Vremya Newspaper

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NEWS
March 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British publishing tycoon Robert Maxwell launched an Israeli Russian-language weekly newspaper, Vremya, produced by Soviet Jewish emigres. Maxwell said he hopes eventually to circulate the newspaper in Moscow. The Vremya staff, which has been publishing a daily Russian-language page in the Hebrew newspaper Maariv, is made up of Russian Jews who emigrated to Israel. Natan Sharansky, the celebrated former dissident, is chairman of the editorial board.
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NEWS
March 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British publishing tycoon Robert Maxwell launched an Israeli Russian-language weekly newspaper, Vremya, produced by Soviet Jewish emigres. Maxwell said he hopes eventually to circulate the newspaper in Moscow. The Vremya staff, which has been publishing a daily Russian-language page in the Hebrew newspaper Maariv, is made up of Russian Jews who emigrated to Israel. Natan Sharansky, the celebrated former dissident, is chairman of the editorial board.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A leading Kazakh writer has nominated actor Sasha Baron Cohen for a national award for popularizing Kazakhstan. Novelist Sapabek Asip-uly called on the Kazakh Club of Art Patrons to give Baron Cohen its annual award, according to a letter published by the Vremya newspaper in Almaty, Kazakhstan, this week.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One campaigner was hospitalized after an unknown assailant threw acid in his face. Mayor Anatoly A. Sobchak claims that his opponents are bankrolled by organized crime. Yuri Boldyrev and other challengers accuse the incumbent of media manipulation, intimidating opponents and selling out St. Petersburg to rescue struggling Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sergei Tretyakov, a Russian diplomat, knows that the Cold War is over. But when his five-year term at the Russian mission to the United Nations ended, Tretyakov didn't want to go home. In October, he wrapped up his assignment, the mission withdrew him from the U.N. rolls, and he prepared to fly back to Moscow. And then he disappeared. After he failed to show up in Russia, the Russian Foreign Ministry had to ask the U.S. State Department if it had seen the missing diplomat.
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