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Vtech Holdings Ltd

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BUSINESS
March 27, 2001 | Bloomberg News
VTech Holdings Ltd., the biggest maker of cordless phones, said it will fire 16% of its workers and take a $133-million charge to help stem losses at a phone unit it bought from Lucent Technologies Inc. last year. The Hong Kong-based company expects to save $30 million a year in operating costs by cutting 3,000 jobs at plants in Mexico it acquired with Lucent's fixed-line phone-making business last March. It will cut 1,500 other jobs in China, North America and Europe.
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BUSINESS
March 27, 2001 | Bloomberg News
VTech Holdings Ltd., the biggest maker of cordless phones, said it will fire 16% of its workers and take a $133-million charge to help stem losses at a phone unit it bought from Lucent Technologies Inc. last year. The Hong Kong-based company expects to save $30 million a year in operating costs by cutting 3,000 jobs at plants in Mexico it acquired with Lucent's fixed-line phone-making business last March. It will cut 1,500 other jobs in China, North America and Europe.
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BUSINESS
August 25, 2006 | From Reuters
Once upon a time, this frog was a prince. About three years ago, educational toy maker LeapFrog Enterprises Inc. was enjoying its status as an industry darling. Its stock was trading at about $47 a share, and its signature LeapPad electronic learning toys were gobbling up competitors' formerly secure shelf space. Today, the stock is down about 85% from its 2003 high. Like the prince from the fairy tale, LeapFrog is suffering an identity crisis.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cordless phones were supposed to let us lose the curly umbilical that kept us tied to whatever room the telephone was in. But it wasn't long until the freedom to move from kitchen to dining room--maybe as far as the garage or front porch, or to the end of the driveway if we had a really fancy model--didn't seem like much freedom at all. We wanted room to roam, but all we got was a longer leash.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dubbed Silicon Valley South for its flowering of high-technology companies in the 1990s, Guadalajara is drooping these days, having lost 18,000 jobs, several marquee companies and hundreds of millions in investment over the last two years. The region is struggling mightily to reinvent itself, with private industry and the state government of Jalisco teaming up to try to attract "value-added" systems design and software companies to replace the scores of vanished assembly operations.
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